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    New Study Reveals What The American Dream Looks Like Today





    What exactly is the American Dream today? A recent study with the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) and IKEA shows that people are no longer focusing on material possessions, but rather looking for quality of life and the freedom to simply do as they please.

    It’s also interesting to note that in light of the social and income inequality issues facing the country that 63% of Americans believe being treated equally regardless of one’s background and the freedom to live as they choose will define the American dream for future generations.

  • 74% of people believe the American Dream itself is as diverse as the people in America

  • 76% of Americans believe it’s a journey, not an end goal

  • 57% said the American Dream is more about quality of life rather than material possessions

  • Respondents said the American Dream today is most about having the freedom to live life on their own terms

  • 80% of Americans still believe they have the same or a better chance of fulfilling the dream than other Americans.


  • http://www.digitalnewsagency.com/stories/10307-americans-transition-from-the-white-picket-fence-and-say-the-new-american-dream-is-having-the-freedom-to-live-life-on-your-own-terms


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    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness, timeliness, or completeness.






    Change


    Hello Sir/Ma'am,

    My name is Cameron DeAngelo Stevens, I am a 28 year old Black Male. I am a proud United States Naval Veteran and a current graphic and web design student at the Art Institute of Tampa.

    I am writing this letter, because I am very hurt, angered, and confused about the current state of humanity in the United States of America. Over the past few days, I have watched on the news as not only Black men have been murdered ON CAMERA, but many others of non African decent have been murdered by "officers of the law". Officers that were hired to protect, no not hired, but, officers who swore an oath to protect the very people who's lives they have taken.

    The intent of this letter is not to recount the countless saddening events of the past week, or even the past year, but to reach out a hand ask for help from those around me that may share in my grief. I do not have children of my own, but I cannot imagine what it must feel like to lose someone so dear to your heart. Though I do not have children, I do have a sister (14) who today, I had to call and speak to as if she were an adult. I should not have to tell my sister that she has to make adult decisions when her biggest worry should be passing a math test, I should not have to tell my sister that she has to stay calm while an officer of the law may be freaking out because of her skin color (something she did not have the privilege to choose), I SHOULD NOT have to tell my sister that SHE, a 14 year old little girl, because of a choice she herself could not make, MAY NOT MAKE IT HOME TONIGHT if she comes in contact with someone who is SUPPOSED to protect her life at all cost chooses instead to take the very life that they have sworn to protect, simply because of her color.

    My request is simply this: I would like to start a not for profit organization geared towards a simple thing, CHANGE.....

    It takes only one voice to change and apparently, my own voice has more power than I originally thought. Over the past few days, I have been consistently using Social Media to post information that I hoped would open others eyes to injustice not only in the black community, but in other race communities as well. This is not appreciated by many and on a consistent basis, my post are being deleted or taken down by these social media outlets. My posts are not talk of violence, because I believe that vengeance and violence WILL ONLY BRING MORE VIOLENCE. I am calling for unity among all, not just blacks, but again, there are some who would like to silence a call to cease the senseless violence. I would like to use my voice while I have the attention of an audience who wants for the exact same thing I would like to strive for. Before the violence becomes any worse, I would like to gather others to build an initiative for change.

    As I said before, I am a college student and do not have the financial capability to accomplish my goal, I would ask that if possible, you would help by donating toward changing the today and the future of how American people simply see and act toward other people. Not all black people are bad and not all cops are corrupt.

    If this request sounds naïve then I would like to apologize, but I must do something......

    Very Respectfully,
    Cameron D. Stevens
    c.stevens@supasola.com


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    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness, timeliness, or completeness.






    American Dream Still Alive, But...



    CREDIT: WGBH/Meredith Nierman


    A majority of U.S. residents believe the American middle class is just a vestige of the past, according to an Exclusive Point Taken-Marist Poll, commissioned by WGBH Boston for its new late-night, multi-platform PBS debate series Point Taken. But, despite a pessimistic view about the viability of the American middle class, most adults nationally think the American Dream is attainable for themselves, 69%. Although fewer, many think it is in reach for other Americans, 58%, as well.

    This is the first national survey being conducted by The Marist Poll in advance of every week’s Point Taken episode. The series, hosted by Carlos Watson, Emmy Award winning journalist and OZY Media co-founder and CEO, premieres April 5, 2016 11pm ET (check local listings) and streams live on pbs.org/pointtaken.

    When thinking back to their childhood, nearly three in four Americans, 72%, say they are better off than their parents. Still, a notable 20% report they are not doing as well as their elders.

    Americans are slightly less optimistic about their children’s future. While 58% think their children will be better off than they are now, about one-third, 33%, say their children will be in a worse position. The picture becomes bleaker when the focus shifts to the future of America’s youth, in general. Nearly half of residents, 48%, believe most children in the United States will grow up to be worse off than their parents while 43% say children, overall, will be better off.

    Racial differences exist. Non-white Americans are more likely to think the American Dream is alive and that, when thinking about their childhood, they are better off than their parents. People of color are also more likely than white Americans to report that, both, their children and most of the nation’s children, in general, will be better off in the future. Here, the differences are marked. 72% of non-white residents, compared with 49% of whites, say their children will be in a better situation than they are currently. Looking at America’s youth, 54% of nonwhites say children, in general, will be better off, compared with 35% of white residents who have this opinion.

    “This national poll highlights the squeeze of the middle class,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “But, you can’t focus on Americans’ views about the status of the American Dream without talking about racial differences.”

    “These results create a framework for Point Taken’s digital dialogue and televised debate – and we hope audiences will explore more online and join the conversation,” says Denise Dilanni, series creator and Senior Executive-in-Charge.

    As alluded to earlier, a majority of Americans, 53%, believe the middle class is dead. There are now only those who are struggling and those who are not. 44% disagree and believe a strong middle class remains in the United States. Racial differences are seen here, as well. When it comes to the state of the nation’s middle class, a majority of non-whites, 52%, think the middle class is still strong while only 40% of whites agree.

    But, do Americans perceive their economic situation to be a struggle? While more than six in ten residents nationally report they or their families do not struggle to get a good job or raise in pay, 61%, or to meet their monthly bills and expenses, 64%, more than one in three says they have trouble earning a living wage, 38%, or making ends meet, 34%. 51% say they rarely, if ever, have concern about meeting their monthly expenses while 49% worry, at least, part of the time.

    Who worries more about family finances? Residents who earn less than $50,000, Democrats, women, or those without a college education are more likely to express concern than their counterparts.

    Education matters here. College graduates, 74%, are more likely than non-college graduates, 59%, to report that they do not struggle to meet their monthly expenses. College graduates, 71%, are also more likely than those who have not graduated from college, 56%, to say they do not struggle to find a good paying job. Not surprisingly, then, college graduates, 62%, express little to no worry about meeting their monthly expenses while, in contrast, a majority of those without a college degree, 54%, are concerned about making ends meet at least some of the time.

    Looking at the jobs picture in the United States, 57% of Americans say it is difficult to find a job that supports a family. 39% have the opposite view and report the problem is not the lack of jobs but the lack of work ethic. When it comes to the availability of jobs for America’s young people, 50% of residents think entry level jobs exist, but young people don’t want to work their way up. 45% believe good entry level jobs are just not available for America’s youth.

    For more on Point Taken:
    pbs.org/pointtaken
    #pointtakenPBS

    For more on The Marist Poll:
    Maristpoll.marist.edu
    #MaristPoll

    About The Marist Poll
    Founded in 1978, The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion (MIPO) is a survey research center at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. The Marist Poll has conducted independent research on public priorities, elections, and a wide variety of social issues. Through the regular public release of surveys, MIPO has built a legacy of independence, reliability, and accuracy. Its results are featured in print and electronic media throughout the world.

    About WGBH Boston
    WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Arthur, Curious George and more than a dozen other primetime, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a major supplier of programming for public radio, and oversees Public Radio International (PRI). As a leader in educational multimedia for the classroom, WGBH supplies content to PBS LearningMedia, a national broadband service for teachers and students. WGBH also is a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to those with hearing or visual impairments. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors. More info at www.wgbh.org.


    ooOoo


    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness, timeliness, or completeness.




AMERICAN
   

  1. American Tradition of Multiculturalism...
    People talk a lot about “multiculturalism,” whether to praise it or condemn it. But standing alone, the concept is too vague to be supported or opposed.

  2. America's Tipping Point...
    While the U.S. Census estimates America's whites will become a minority in 2043 - making the country majority-minority - a group says that future is already here.

  3. A Multicultural Society - Boundless...
    In the United States, continuous mass immigration has been a feature of economy and society since the first half of the 19th century.

  4. The 17 Most American Things You Can Buy At Walmart...
    The rich celebs boycotting the store are “too enlightened to let their poor neighbors pay low prices.” But the real question remains: What are these “poor neighbors” buying at Walmart, anyway? Is it good for them? Is it good for America?

  5. 4th Of July Special...
    4th Of July Special: Here are the 76 Most American Things Ever

  6. Great Things About America - Fortune...
    It’s time for a breather, America. Fire up the grill, ice down the drinks, and pop open that patio umbrella. Health care, the oil spill, Afghanistan, China, Elena Kagan and financial reform will all be waiting.

  7. American Stuff...
    Welcome to American Stuff. We sell unique American gift bags, boxes & tins for all occasions including Birthdays, Valentines, Easter, Graduation, Mothers day, Fathers day, Halloween, thank you & Christmas. We also offer wedding favours & corporate gifts at a budget to suit you.

  8. Great American Things - Esquire...
    Knives, shirts, oysters, and thirty-nine more uniquely American products (and other things). Go to our store at madecollection.com/esquire to buy (most of) them right now.

  9. 'Doing some American stuff...
    Citizens provide armed security at recruiting station.

  10. The Celebration of American STUFF...
    Thanksgiving is an American tradition that is especially meaningful for the Christian because it gives us an opportunity to change our focus from our prosperity to God.

  11. 21 Very American Things You'll Be Surprised You Didn't Know...
    If you’re an American, you definitely need to learn these things. Even if you’re not, they’re pretty cool.













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