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    Trouble or typical male teenage angst? 5 ways to know for sure


     Clayton Lessor


    It's tempting to ignore various warning signs, preferring to think your boy is just going through a phase, but is that the case? Is your son in trouble, or is it just typical teenage angst?

    For over 20 years Clayton Lessor has helped countless troubled teens make the transition from boyhood to adult life. He is the founder of The Quest Project, a program designed to help boys transition from boyhood to manhood, and author of the news book, Saving Our Sons: A Parent's Guide to Preparing Boys for Success.

    “Boys have a really hard time growing up these days,” he said. “Young men facing crisis without help can fall far behind their female counterparts in school and in life. They are failing to learn the lessons they need to survive and thrive in the adult world.”

    Lessor’s book contains time tested battle hardened strategies and tactics for helping parents aid in the transition from boyhood to manhood.

    Here are five key warning signs that indicate a teenage boy is in trouble and what to do about it.


    Warning Sign #1: Father gone

    Solution:
    Get him a mentor. Whether his dad is physically or emotionally unavailable, your son needs a male mentor. Make sure it's someone you both trust -- an uncle, a family friend, a neighbor, a teacher, or a coach.


    Warning Sign #2: Depressed or scared

    Solution:
    Get him in counseling. Many boys simply don't know how to deal with the pain that comes with adolescence and often turn to drugs and alcohol for relief. He may think he's just partying or rebelling against your rules, but substance abuse numbs pain, and numbing pain does not make it go away. Get him help.


    Warning Sign #3: Loner or in bad company

    Solution:
    Enroll him in a support group. The more your son is regularly exposed to healthy and mature men the better access he will have to quality support. Get involved in various organizations, church groups, meet ups, neighborhood gatherings, etc. Find ways for him to interact with more people and find the support he needs.


    Warning Sign #4: Doesn't feel worthy or appreciated. States that you don't understand how hard or what he is going through

    Solution:
    He needs a ritual or celebration to make his transformation. This can be as simple as a conversation. "I know this is the beginning of a change for you, and that you're no longer a little boy, and I want you to know that I can identify it and I can see it." Even if he rolls his eyes at you (which he very well might), what matters is that he knows you validate what he's going through.


    Warning Sign #5: Lack of direction

    Solution:
    He needs a sense of achievement, importance and change. Feed him what he loves, wind him up, set him free, and watch him soar. If he falls down, pick him up, wash off the scrapes, and start over. Focus on what he does right, not what he's doing wrong. When you catch him meeting and exceeding your expectations, let him know you notice. That builds a healthy foundation for continued achievement.


    For more information visit www.claytonlessor.com

    Saving Our Sons: A Parent’s Guide to Preparing Boys for Success

    Clayton Lessor

    List $16.95
    Paperback: 196 pages
    ISBN-10: 0996360700 ISBN-13: 978-0996360708
    Quest Project Press (September 1, 2016)
    Saving Our Sons: A Parent’s Guide to Preparing Boys for Success is a recipient of the prestigious Mom’s Choice Award.

    About Clayton Lessor
     Clayton Lessor


    Clayton J. Lessor, MA, LPC is a PhD candidate who specializes in the treatment of adolescents, families, couples and individuals through workshops, groups and individual counseling. For over 20 years he has helped countless troubled teens make the transition from boyhood to adult life through The Quest Project--A Boys to Men Experience program, which he created, developed, and facilitates. He received a Bachelors-University of Missouri St. Louis (UMSL), a Masters from Lindenwood University, and will receive his Doctorate in Education (candidate 2016) from Capella University.

    He lives in St. Louis with his wife, Deb, and their two dogs.

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    Royalty Boys LLC


    Our mission is to help boys 10-17 years of age through a critical time in their life. To help each of them find their spiritual identity, and to help them better themselves and find their purpose in life, which will strengthen their position in this State and Nation. R.B.I is a Brotherhood where effective practices in the field of child and youth development can be documented, demonstrated and disseminated.

    Royalty Boys LLC, Will support boys in development and impoverished communities by teaching and equipping them with moral, ethics and values we will be able to re-socialize the community and stregthen the bonds of families. Within the Next five (5) years, Royalty Boys LLC, will become a 21st Century company by building partnerships and using community networking to expand our resources. Roylaty Boys LLC, will create and enviornment where youth will be motivated to become successful in thier personal lives and communities.

    GOALS:
    •Build character, self-esteem, confidence and self respect.
    •Teach each individual how to become independent and resourceful
    •Show each Brother how to explore beyond their comfort zone and challenge themselves.
    •Discover their individual, creative voices
    •Strive for their highest potential
    •Embrace the ideas of Brotherhood
    •Meet every goal set for each individua

    http://www.royaltyboys.com/


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    Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color Responds to Ferguson Decision

    - Calls on Police and Schools to be Better Trained in Dealing with their Communities -


    “There are many lessons to be learned from the tragic events in Ferguson,” said Ron Walker, Executive Director of the Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color, (COSEBOC). “The death of Michael Brown, police response, and the community reaction show the critical importance of cultural competency, or how we relate to each other. As educators, we know positive outcomes for young men of color happen when adults understand the young people in their community and pro-actively support their academic, social and emotional development. We are calling on schools to create learning environments that support culturally competent educators and young men. And we are calling on police to be trained to understand and serve their communities in appropriate ways – in moments of crisis and every day.”

    About COSEBOC
    The Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color (COSEBOC) is a national network of school leaders focused on educating boys and young men of color. The non-profit organization is a leading resource and a repository of tested, innovative, ‘real world’ practices and research that help boys and young men of color succeed. COSEBOC ‘s mission is to connect, inspire, support and strengthen school leaders dedicated to the social, emotional and academic development of boys and young men of color. Headquartered in Boston, MA, COSEBOC’s national network of school leaders represents 600 schools educating 300,000 students across the United States.

    COSEBOC provides Standards for schools to adopt based on research and the innovative policies and practices of successful schools. The publication, “Standards and Promising Practices for Educating Boys and Young Men of Color”, provides a framework for assessment, curriculum, training, leadership, community engagement and more for schools across the country.


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    NBA Math Hoops & Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color to Hold Tweetchat

    - Tweetchat Begins at 4pm EDT Using #COSEBOC to Join the Conversation -


    Today from 4pm-6pm EDT COSEBOC (Coalition for Schools Educating Boys of Color) http://www.coseboc.org will hold aTweetchat discussing "CREATING MATH CHAMPIONS". The Tweetchat will be hosted by Nick Monzi and Khalil Fuller of NBA Math Hoops.

    Hosts:
    Nick Monzi: @NickMonzi - Director of Programs at NBA Math Hoops, Visual Staff at Madison Scouts and Visual Designer at Monzi Drill Design

    Khalil Fuller: CEO at Learn Fresh, Echoing Green Black Male Achievement Fellow & Forbes 30 Under 30 Honoree for Social Entrepreneurship

    @NBAMathHoops - Creating Math Champions


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    Why 200 Black Men Raised Concerns About Obama's Initiative Targeting Men and Boys of Color

    - Dani McClain -


    More than 200 black men have signed on to a letter expressing concerns about My Brother's Keeper, the initiative launched by President Obama and the philanthropic community earlier this year to address what the White House calls "opportunity gaps" facing young men and boys of color. The signers--among them actor and activist Danny Glover, scholar Robin D.G. Kelley and author Kiese Laymon--take issue with the $200 million effort's exclusive focus on boys and men.

    The entire letter is worth a read, but its argument is summed up in its final paragraph:

    If the denunciation of male privilege, sexism and rape culture is not at the center of our quest for racial justice, then we have endorsed a position of benign neglect towards the challenges that girls and women face that undermine their well-being and the well-being of the community as a whole. As Black men we believe if the nation chooses to "save" only Black males from a house on fire, we will have walked away from a set of problems that we will be compelled to return to when we finally realize the raging fire has consumed the Black women and girls we left behind.

    I raised similar concerns after the president's February announcement, so I'll be closely watching this effort to encourage the initiative to adopt a stance that's more inclusive to women and girls. This more holistic approach is crucial, according to the letter's signers, in part because "our historic struggle for racial justice has always included men as well as women who have risked everything not just for themselves or for their own gender but for the prospects of the entire community."

    Vassar College professor Luke Harris is a co-founder of the African American Policy Forum, a think tank that's helping coordinate the effort and hosting the letter on its website. Harris is one of ten men who are recruiting and organizing signers. He told me this week that the overwhelming response to the letter has been gratitude.

    "There are a lot of people who feel that this is a threshold moment for us to have a conversation," he said, and emphasized the similarities between the My Brother's Keeper initiative and the Million Man March in 1995. Then, event organizers invited men to reclaim their families and communities. Women were asked to stay home.

    "From our perspective, it's a glaring example of the same phenomenon," Harris said. "It's a long-term rebranding of the racial justice discourse into a struggle by and for black male leadership, empowerment and responsibility." What this amounts to, according to Harris, is "the subsequent marginalization of the role of African-American women as actors in the racial justice movement and a decentering of their needs, which are every bit as important as the needs of their brothers."

    The same message is amplified in an op-ed by Harris published this week. In it, he takes on the widespread perception that girls and women of color are somehow in an advantaged position vis-à-vis boys and men, writing:

    We know, but do we care that Black girls are much more likely to be suspended than all other girls and most boys as well? We know, but do we care, that Black women have lower average incomes and possess significantly less wealth than both Black men and White women? We know, but do we care, that Black women are disproportionately burdened with childcare in situations of acute poverty?

    Harris also takes on the narrow definitions of family, the heteronormativity and the leap in logic at the heart of the initiative, writing, "The underlying message here is rooted in the idea that if we help the boys and men, then the situation of girls and women will inevitably get better. With better husbands and sons everything will just 'click.'"

    It's that apparent trickle-down approach to racial uplift that's given me pause as I've watched the philanthropic community and now the White House adopt this emphasis on boys and men. After I asked how and whether girls and women fit into the My Brother's Keeper initiative, some commenters countered that girls and women don't need a place at this particular table because their needs were being addressed by the White House Council on Women and Girls, which was launched in 2009. But a statement the National Organization of Women released last week in support of the men's letter shows why comparing the two efforts is apples and oranges:

    Women and girls of color are in a deep crisis that is too often overlooked. We do not fault the White House Council on Women and Girls for not producing an initiative of the breadth and scope of "My Brother's Keeper," as they were neither tasked nor--as importantly--funded to do so. [Emphasis mine.] The Council's charge applies to "all" women and girls. But if the specific concerns of girls and young women of color are not investigated and addressed, it becomes all too easy to reinforce the unfortunate myth that girls of color have succeeded and are not in need of attention.

    There's a reason it's easy to forget that there even is a White House initiative for girls: Money makes the world go 'round, and that older initiative lacks the at least $200 million over five years that the philanthropic community has put in place for boys and men. That NOW even weighed in to offer this perspective and its support for the letter highlights the unexpected bedfellows aspect of the current debate, legal scholar and African American Political Forum co-founder Kimberlé Crenshaw told me.

    "This is really an unprecedented moment in feminist and anti-racist politics. I can't remember a time in history when a group of black men, particularly as diverse as this--academics, laborers, entertainers--have actually made a statement calling on the community and society at large to directly focus on the plight facing African-American women. Another first is a feminist group basically applauding a black male group," she said. "Each is acknowledging the extent to which race politics and gender politics hadn't done a good job elevating some of the issues facing women of color." Crenshaw called the closing of ranks by the letter's signers and NOW a "mirror opposite" of the group represented at the president's My Brother's Keeper press conference in February. There, conservative Fox News commentator Bill O'Reilly and former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg--whose commitment to a stop-and-frisk policy that targets young men of color is well-documented--offered their support. It's the initiative's focus on personal responsibility over institutional racism and the structures that disadvantage youth of color that allows people like O'Reilly and Bloomberg to feel comfortable getting on board.

    "That's a political realignment," Crenshaw said of the camps on either side of the debate.

    Harris, of the African American Policy Forum, said a webinar to further discuss the sign-on letter and next steps will be held Thursday, June 12. Details can be found on the think tank's website as they become available.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    Dani McClain is a fellow at the Nation Institute. Her writing and reporting on gender, sexuality and reproductive health has been published in outlets including The Nation, The New York Times "Room for Debate," Al Jazeera America, Colorlines and EBONY.com. She lives in Oakland, California.

    McClain reported on education and youth issues while on staff at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. She has also worked as a strategist, online campaigner and communications staffer with organizations including ColorOfChange.org and Drug Policy Alliance.




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    BLACK BOYS VIEWED AS OLDER, LESS INNOCENT THAN WHITES, RESEARCH FINDS

    - Police likelier to use force against black children when officers 'dehumanize' blacks, study says -


    WASHINGTON - Black boys as young as 10 may not be viewed in the same light of childhood innocence as their white peers, but are instead more likely to be mistaken as older, be perceived as guilty and face police violence if accused of a crime, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

    "Children in most societies are considered to be in a distinct group with characteristics such as innocence and the need for protection. Our research found that black boys can be seen as responsible for their actions at an age when white boys still benefit from the assumption that children are essentially innocent," said author Phillip Atiba Goff, PhD, of the University of California, Los Angeles. The study was published online in APA's Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

    Researchers tested 176 police officers, mostly white males, average age 37, in large urban areas, to determine their levels of two distinct types of bias -- prejudice and unconscious dehumanization of black people by comparing them to apes. To test for prejudice, researchers had officers complete a widely used psychological questionnaire with statements such as "It is likely that blacks will bring violence to neighborhoods when the move in." To determine officers' dehumanization of blacks, the researchers gave them a psychological task in which they paired blacks and whites with large cats, such as lions, or with apes. Researchers reviewed police officers' personnel records to determine use of force while on duty and found that those who dehumanized blacks were more likely to have used force against a black child in custody than officers who did not dehumanize blacks. The study described use of force as takedown or wrist lock; kicking or punching; striking with a blunt object; using a police dog, restraints or hobbling; or using tear gas, electric shock or killing. Only dehumanization and not police officers' prejudice against blacks -- conscious or not -- was linked to violent encounters with black children in custody, according to the study.

    The authors noted that police officers' unconscious dehumanization of blacks could have been the result of negative interactions with black children, rather than the cause of using force with black children. "We found evidence that overestimating age and culpability based on racial differences was linked to dehumanizing stereotypes, but future research should try to clarify the relationship between dehumanization and racial disparities in police use of force," Goff said.

    The study also involved 264 mostly white, female undergraduate students from large public U.S. universities. In one experiment, students rated the innocence of people ranging from infants to 25-year-olds who were black, white or an unidentified race. The students judged children up to 9 years old as equally innocent regardless of race, but considered black children significantly less innocent than other children in every age group beginning at age 10, the researchers found.

    The students were also shown photographs alongside descriptions of various crimes and asked to assess the age and innocence of white, black or Latino boys ages 10 to 17. The students overestimated the age of blacks by an average of 4.5 years and found them more culpable than whites or Latinos, particularly when the boys were matched with serious crimes, the study found. Researchers used questionnaires to assess the participants' prejudice and dehumanization of blacks. They found that participants who implicitly associated blacks with apes thought the black children were older and less innocent.

    In another experiment, students first viewed either a photo of an ape or a large cat and then rated black and white youngsters in terms of perceived innocence and need for protection as children. Those who looked at the ape photo gave black children lower ratings and estimated that black children were significantly older than their actual ages, particularly if the child had been accused of a felony rather than a misdemeanor.

    "The evidence shows that perceptions of the essential nature of children can be affected by race, and for black children, this can mean they lose the protection afforded by assumed childhood innocence well before they become adults," said co-author Matthew Jackson, PhD, also of UCLA. "With the average age overestimation for black boys exceeding four-and-a-half years, in some cases, black children may be viewed as adults when they are just 13 years old."

    Article: "The Essence of Innocence: Consequences of Dehumanizing Black Children," Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, published online Feb. 24, 2014; Phillip Atiba Goff, PhD, and Matthew Christian Jackson, PhD; University of California, Los Angeles; Brooke Allison, PhD, and Lewis Di Leone, PhD, National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Boston; Carmen Marie Culotta, PhD, Pennsylvania State University; and Natalie Ann DiTomasso, JD, University of Pennsylvania.

    Full text of the article is available from the APA Public Affairs Office and at http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/psp-a0035663.pdf.

    Contact: Dr. Goff at (310) 206-8614 (preferred) or goff@psych.ucla.edu. If Dr. Goff is unavailable, contact Dr. Jackson at (814) 574-9781 or mcjackson@ucla.edu.

    The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA's membership includes more than 134,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives.

    www.apa.org


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    Discovery Communications Applauds President Obama's "My Brother's Keeper" Initiative


    Discovery Communications applauds President Obama for his leadership in creating the “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative, a public and private partnership that addresses the crisis our nation is facing to improve circumstances for young men and boys of color. Discovery is committed to helping seek and provide solutions, so that every child, no matter their color or economic circumstance, can fully realize the American dream.

    In communities of color, unequal access to early childhood education and a lack of exposure to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs, often lead to educational disparities in student achievement. As envisioned by the President, Discovery will work with others from the business, philanthropic, government and non-profit sectors as they develop an aggressive agenda that will seek to close these and other disparities.

    "Discovery is fully committed to supporting a vision of equality and fairness, in which every American can have the opportunity to create a better life for themselves and their families," said David Zaslav, President and CEO of Discovery Communications. "We look forward to working with the President on the ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ initiative to help increase success in education, entrepreneurship and employment for young men and boys of color."

    Discovery Familia, the premiere Spanish-language network dedicated to bringing the best educational and entertaining, family-oriented programming to children and families, substantiates and supports the need to create an affinity and love for learning while children are in their formative years. Through its rich and curriculum-based programming, the network is meant to serve as a resource for Hispanic preschoolers by sparking curiosity and encouraging independent thinking while preserving the Spanish language.

    Through its “Discover Your Skills” job skills campaign and “Connect the Dots” campaign to encourage students to explore and pursue STEM careers, Discovery has already taken numerous steps to ensure equal access to educational services for boys and men of color.

    In addition, Discovery Education has developed and made available Discovery Education STEM Camp and corresponding professional development training to teachers, education partners and non-profits. Discovery Education STEM Camp is a dynamic series of standards-aligned curricula for use as part of summer camps and after-school programs that provide resources including hands-on and virtual labs, engineering challenges, digital investigations, videos and career connections designed to inspire and engage students in learning about STEM subjects.

    Discovery Education has a proven track record of providing digital content that improves academic achievement for low-income students of color. Over 72 percent of US schools that currently use Discovery Education services are Title I schools where African-American and Latino students represent at least 43 percent of the student population. Through deep partnerships in school districts such as Houston, Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Baltimore County and Chicago, Discovery Education is able to provide dynamic digital content and professional development to enhance teacher instruction and student learning experiences as districts go through their digital transformations. These efforts are generating results. In Charlotte-Mecklenburg, for instance, fifth graders in Title I schools increased their science test scores by 21 percentage points after using Discovery Education’s digital learning tools. These are the outcomes needed across the country to close the educational achievement gap for young men and boys of color.

    For more information on Discovery Communications’ initiatives, go to www.discoverycommunications.com and on Discovery Education, go to www.discoveryeducation.com.


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    Celebrate Black Male Achievement Week with an American Promise Premiere Party!


    Are you ready to lift up the achievements of the black boys in your community this year? Celebrate Black Male Achievement Week on Feb. 3rd-9th by hosting a Premiere Party to engage friends, family and community members in discussions and activities around the issues raised in American Promise.

    Fill out the Black Male Achievement Week Form to have your event or activity included under the Black Male Achievement Week banner. You'll also automatically be entered for a chance to win a Premiere Party Pack with the American Promise DVD, book, t–shirt, and more! Enter Now.

    Here are some ways to participate:

    Host a viewing party--large or small--to watch and discuss American Promise during the premiere broadcast on PBS on Monday, February 3rd (check local listings).

    Host a Promise Club (a parents and caregivers meeting) or book club meeting with PROMISES KEPT: Raising Black Boys to Succeed in School and in Life-Lessons Learned from the 12-Year American Promise Project.

    Host a school faculty event. Watch the film and then use the professional development curricula.

    Host a black male achievement panel with leaders in your community.

    Already working on an event around black male achievement or educational equity? Add your event under the Black Male Achievement week banner so we can help promote it.

    Join the Black Male Achievement Week Conversation Online!

    Black Male Achievement Week


    Today: Become an American Promise Ambassador, change your Facebook and/or Twitter profiles: Click here to join.

    Monday, February 3 at 2:00 PM: Google Hangout with the College Board on the African-American Male AP Participation Gap. Check out & share our new infographic here!

    Monday, February 3 at 9:00 PM: Black Male Achievement Week, #BMAWeek twitter chat with the American Promise filmmakers, team and partners. Follow #BMAWeek to join!

    Tuesday, February 4 at 6:00 PM: Online screening of American Promise on OVEE with filmmakers, Big Brothers, Big Sisters of America and America's Promise Alliance.

    Wednesday, February 5 at 8:00 PM: Online Promises Kept book club discussion with Mocha Moms on GoodReads. Leave a question here.


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    - COSEBOC’s Award Schools recognized for proven success in closing the achievement gap among boys of color -

    (BLACK PR WIRE) – Chicago – At its annual meeting in Chicago on Friday, the Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color will announce five new recipients of the COSEBOC School Award, which recognizes and rewards schools that have a proven track record of effective pre K-12 education of male students of color.

    COSEBOC is a national network of schools and highly-respected educators, researchers, policy-makers and advocates focused on sharing and promoting promising approaches and initiatives that improve education at schools with significant populations of young men of color.

    This years’ award schools are Best Academy in Minneapolis; Devonshire Elementary School in Charlotte, NC; Thurgood Marshall Academy in Washington DC; and Merrillville High School and Salk Elementary, both in Merrillville, Indiana (Full summaries of each school can be found at http://www.coseboc.org/sites/coseboc.org/files/assets/COSEBOC-5AwardSchools.pdf).

    “Identifying schools that have developed effective, creative and sustainable approaches and sharing those successes with other educators is the cornerstone of the work we do at COSEBOC,” said Ron Walker, Executive Director, COSEBOC. “The COSEBOC School Awards are proof and evidence of the fact that there are educational environments that work extremely well for boys and young men of color.”

    The awards will be bestowed to school leaders at COSEBOC’s 7th Annual Gathering of Leaders on Friday evening, where teachers and students from each school will share their winning formulas for success with Gathering attendees. David Johns, who was recently appointed by President Obama as the executive director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans, is scheduled to attend the awards dinner and address Gathering participants.

    Along with the recognition, each school will receive a $10,000 grant. The COSEBOC School Awards are supported by the Campaign for Black Male Achievement, Open Society Foundations.

    Through extensive research, COSEBOC has determined that the most effective schools combine a culture of high-quality instruction, whole school community engagement and high expectations, with a focus on social and emotional development, helping students develop their personal identities through a connection to their cultural and historical legacies, and instilling in students the responsibility to serve their communities.

    The schools were selected based on a rigorous, three-stage selection process, the COSEBOC School Award’s blue ribbon panel determined that these five schools were successful in engaging and educating male students of color based on traditional measures of success, including test scores, graduation rates and college attendance.

    “These five schools are unrepentant in their belief that students can succeed and soar to great achievement levels. Each is led by a principal who is determined to build great schools. Most importantly, they know that great schools are not an accident," said Walker.

    About COSEBOC
    The mission of the Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color (COSEBOC) is to connect, inspire, support and strengthen school leaders dedicated to the social, emotional and academic development of boys and young men of color.

    COSEBOC is a networked learning community of educators, researchers, policymakers and caring adults that support school leaders with high quality professional development so they can realize this vision of making success an attainable goal for every male student of color. For more information about COSEBOC including membership, professional development opportunities or to view Standards and Promising Practices for Schools Educating Boys of Color, visit www.coseboc.org.

    NOTE: Officials from COSEBOC or any of the COSEBOC School Award recipients are available for further comment. Please contact Dave Bayless for interviews.

    Contact Information
    Dave Bayless
    baylessdave@gmail.com
    312.533.0059

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    Our boys are at risk

    (BLACK PR WIRE) – Our boys are at risk. Consider there are approximately 184,578 children between the ages of 10 and 17 in Broward County. Black children account for roughly 32%, yet they represent 51% of delinquency referrals versus 25% for white children. Fifty-five percent are judicially disposed, 57% are detained and 61% are committed to a secure facility, compared to their white counterparts at 25%, 15% and 12%, respectively.

    In 2000, voters established the Children’s Services Council (CSC) of Broward County to focus on children through “leadership, advocacy, and funding for services for and on behalf of children.” Has the CSC achieved this goal? The CSC states its formula to distribute funding throughout Broward County is based on tax revenue for different communities. The higher the revenue generated, the greater return to the community. Meaning communities with the greatest need, who also generate less tax revenue, are penalized and therefore receive less public support.

     Elder Mathes Guice
    Elder Mathes Guice

    In the Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males (2010), black male graduation rates in Broward County were the third worst in the nation. Yet, the CSC passed on an opportunity to fund a program involving Broward County Public Schools that provided free transportation and teachers to tutor middle school boys in neighborhoods with high crime and unemployment.

    Questions to the CSC will continue. But, this does not absolve our community of the responsibility to address the needs of our children. We can donate time, resources, and services to assist families in parenting, childcare and securing employment. Finally, we must exert pressure on local stakeholders, including the CSC, to ensure tax dollars are directed to communities and children most in need.

    It is time for everyone to join us in the fight for our boys. If you want to participate, please call (954) 239-4297.

    Elder Mathes Guice is director of the Men’s Ministry at Koinonia Worship Center & Village in Pembroke Park, a municipality his church helped organize in South Florida. He also serves as director of Practitioners Technical Institute, a faith-based community development organization focused on youth and economic empowerment.

    **Media note: Elder Guice is available for phone and on-air interviews to discuss his proven methods for winning the ‘fight for black boys.’ Please contact Matthew Beatty at (305) 948-8063 ext. 209 or mbeatty@sonshine.com to set up one.

    Contact Information
    Mathes Guice
    (954) 239-4297


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.





good quality websites










 
- BLACK/AFRICAN AMERICAN BOYS -
     





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  1. The Urgency of Now...
    The Urgency of Now - The Schott 50 State Report on Black & Latino Males in Education.

  2. Educating African American Boys...
    Our schools deserve an “F”

  3. African American Male Achievement ...
    ENGAGE! ENCOURAGE! EMPOWER! Children don't care what you know, until they know that you care!

  4. PBS NewsHour ...
    Oakland Schools Work to Transform Experience for African-American Boys

  5. Reaching Black Boys ...
    A Catalyst Special Report.

  6. Supporting African American Boys in School...
    Low educational achievement contributes to and perpetuates socioeconomic, health, and other inequalities for African Americans.


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