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    Father of Black Aviation to be Immortalized on Stamp


    - C. Alfred ‘Chief’ Anderson: the Tuskegee Airmen’s Airman -

    BRYN MAWR, PA — Referred to as the Father of Black Aviation, Chief Flight Instructor of the prestigious Tuskegee Airmen C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson, will immortalized on a stamp tomorrow, March 13. The 1 p.m. dedication ceremony, free and open to the public, will take place at Bryn Mawr College’s McPherson Auditorium, 101 North Merion Ave.

    C. Alfred ‘Chief’ Anderson: the Tuskegee Airmen’s Airman
    C. Alfred "Chief" Anderson
    (© 2014 U.S. Postal Service)




    Anderson also has been referred to as the Charles Lindbergh of Black Aviation for his record-breaking flights that inspired other African-Americans to become pilots.

    As the 15th stamp in the Postal Service’s Distinguished American Series, the 70-cent First-Class stamp, available in sets of 20, is good for First-Class Mail weighing up to 2 ounces. Customers may purchase the stamps at usps.com/stamps, at 800-STAMP24 (800-782-6724), at Post Offices nationwide or at ebay.com/stamps.

    “The Postal Service is proud to honor Charles Alfred “Chief” Anderson, a Black aviation pioneer who inspired, motivated and educated thousands of young people in aviation careers, including the famed Tuskegee Airmen of World War II,” said U.S. Postal Service Judicial Officer William Campbell who will dedicate the stamp. Campbell’s father, a decorated Tuskegee Airman, served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

    “Their accomplishments ranked them as one of the elite fighter groups during the war and their heroism will forever be an important part of our country’s history and heritage.

    “It all began with the instruction they received from Chief Anderson, an extraordinary teacher who motivated and inspired them to reach their full potential as military aviators. The Airmen’s professionalism and extraordinary effectiveness in combat was, in large part, the catalyst for President Harry Truman’s issuance in 1948 of Executive Order 9981, which desegregated America’s armed forces.”

    Joining Campbell in dedicating the stamp will be Tuskegee Flight Instructor “Coach” Roscoe Draper who was mentored by Anderson and together taught the Airmen. Other Tuskegee Airmen attending included Val Archer of Stockbridge, GA; Roscoe Brown of Riverdale, NY; Leo Gray of Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Anderson Jefferson of Detroit; Hiram Little of Atlanta; and Theodore Lumpkin, Jr., of Los Angeles. Anderson’s son Charles Alfred Anderson, Jr., of Greensboro, NC; and granddaughter Christina Anderson Augusta, GA, also participated.

    “What makes the stamp so meaningful is that it brings my father’s legacy to life,” said Anderson’s youngest son Charles Alfred Anderson, Jr. “It is truly an honor to have him portrayed as the face of the Tuskegee Airmen.”

    Illustrator Sterling Hundley of Richmond, VA, used a combination of acrylic paint, watercolor, and oil to create the stamp art. His portrait of Anderson is based on a photograph from a 1942 yearbook of the Tuskegee Institute’s flight training school in Tuskegee, AL. Hundley added headgear used by pilots in World War II. Art director Phil Jordan of Falls Church, VA, designed the stamp.

    The Father of Black Aviation
    C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson (1907-1996), traced his fascination with airplanes to his early childhood when he lived with his grandmother in the Shenandoah Valley near Staunton, VA. She was troubled by his habit of running off in search of planes.

    After returning to his parents’ home in Bryn Mawr, PA, Anderson pursued his dream of becoming a pilot. Since no flight schools would accept him as a student because of his race, he needed a plane of his own to learn how to fly. Incredibly, he was able to raise $2,500 from supportive members of his community and bought a used plane. As Anderson later recalled, he learned to fly by reading books, getting some help from a few friendly white pilots, and, in his own words, “fooling around with” the plane. By 1929, he taught himself well enough, against all odds, to obtain a private pilot’s license.

    To help him qualify for an air transport, or commercial license, Anderson eventually found an instructor, Ernest Buehl — a recent immigrant from Germany and owner of a flying school near Philadelphia — who was able to refine his techniques and even persuade a federal examiner to let Anderson take the commercial pilot’s test. When Anderson secured the license in 1932, he was the only African-American in the nation qualified to serve as a flight instructor or to fly commercially.

    The Charles Lindbergh of Black Aviation
    Anderson was soon breaking flight records and inspiring other blacks to become pilots. In 1933, he and Albert E. Forsythe, an African-American physician and Tuskegee Institute alumnus, teamed up to become the first black pilots to complete a round-trip transcontinental flight. With that flight and their goodwill tour to the Caribbean in 1934, they sought to prove to the world the abilities and skills of black aviators. It was this flight that led to Anderson’s being dubbed “The Charles Lindbergh of Black Aviation.”

    As part of the publicity campaign for their goodwill flight, Anderson and Forsythe flew to Tuskegee, AL, for a ceremony at Tuskegee Institute (now Tuskegee University), where their plane was christened The Booker T. Washington, after the famous black leader who was the first head of the renowned educational institution. Tuskegee provided support for the tour, initiating the school’s public role as a promoter of black aviation.

    The Tuskegee Airmen
    World War II gave Anderson the opening he needed to make a career in aviation. In 1939, as war erupted in Europe, Congress created the Civilian Pilot Training Program at the urging of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The program provided funding to train tens of thousands of young people who could be transitioned to military service in the event of war. A provision in the legislation permitted civilian flight training for blacks, a significant step toward the long-range goal of opening up the elite, all-white Army Air Corps to qualified black applicants.

    Tuskegee Institute won a government contract to establish a Civilian Pilot Training Program and named Anderson chief flight instructor soon after hiring him in 1940. To those who learned their piloting skills in the program, he was affectionately known as “Chief.”

    Tuskegee’s subsequent role in training the nation’s first African-American military pilots began in January of 1941, the year leading up to the country’s entry into World War II. The War Department announced plans to create a “Negro pursuit squadron” that would be trained at Tuskegee. In March, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, a champion of equal opportunity, came to the rented airfield Tuskegee was using for flight instruction and was introduced to Anderson. He later recalled her saying that everybody told her blacks couldn’t fly. “I’m going up with you,” she told him, “to find out for sure.” After Anderson gave her an aerial tour of the campus and surrounding area, she announced, “Well, you can fly all right.” A widely publicized photograph of the smiling pair in the cockpit of a Piper Cub sent a powerful message about the First Lady’s support of black aviators.

    Soon after her flight, Roosevelt participated in the decision of the Rosenwald Fund — of which she served as a trustee — to finance the construction of Tuskegee Institute’s own airfield, Moton Field, for a primary flying school. Under a contract with the War Department, the flying school would conduct the first phase of pilot training for black aviation cadets. Construction also began in the summer of 1941 on the Tuskegee Army Air Field, the military airfield where graduates of the primary flying school moved on to complete basic and advanced military flight training.

    The War Department’s plans for a black pursuit squadron took shape when ground crews of the 99th Pursuit Squadron (later renamed the 99th Fighter Squadron) began their training in March 1941. The first class of black pilots graduated in March 1942, and soon thereafter the nation’s first all-black military aviation unit became fully manned. In 1943, the 99th of the U.S. Army Air Forces began combat operations in North Africa. Members— along with members of several other all-black flying units whose pilots began their training under Anderson at Moton Field — are now commonly known as the Tuskegee Airmen.

    During the war, the Tuskegee Airmen escorted heavy bombers on hundreds of missions in the European theater. They flew thousands of sorties, destroyed more than a hundred German aircraft, and received scores of Distinguished Flying Crosses. Their professionalism and effectiveness in combat was a significant reason that in 1949 the newly independent U.S. Air Force became the nation’s first armed service to desegregate.

    For the rest of his life after the war, Anderson pursued his passion for flying and for teaching others to fly. In 1967, he helped organize Negro Airmen International to encourage interest in aviation among African-American youth. In 1996, the “father of black aviation,” as Anderson is often called, died at his home in Tuskegee at age 89.

    His granddaughter Christina established the C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson Legacy foundation, chiefanderson.com. The foundation’s mission is to share and expose Anderson’s legacy through speaking events, a traveling museum and through scholarships presented to deserving youth pursuing education and/or careers in aviation.

    Ordering First-Day-of-Issue Postmarks
    Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at local Post Offices, at usps.com/stamps or by calling 800-STAMP-24. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes to themselves or others and place them in larger envelopes addressed to:

    C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson Stamp
    16 N. Bryn Mawr Ave.
    Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-9998

    After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark up to a quantity of 50. For more than 50, there is a 5-cent charge per postmark. All orders must be postmarked by May 13, 2014.

    Ordering First-Day Covers
    The Postal Service also offers first-day covers for new stamp issues and Postal Service stationery items postmarked with the official first-day-of-issue cancellation. Each item has an individual catalog number and is offered in the quarterly USA Philatelic catalog online at usps.com/shop or by calling 800-782-6724. Customers may request a free catalog by calling 800-782-6724 or writing to:

    U.S. Postal Service
    Catalog Request
    PO Box 219014
    Kansas City, MO 64121-9014

    Philatelic Products
    There are seven philatelic products available for this stamp issue:
    117106, Press Sheet w/Die Cuts, $112.00 (print quantity of 1,000).
    117108, Press Sheet w/o Die Cuts, $112.00 (print quantity of 1,000).

    The Tuskegee Airmen’s Airman

    117110, Keepsake (Pane of 20, 1 DCP), $15.95.

    The Tuskegee Airmen’s Airman

    117116, First-Day Cover, $1.14.

    The Tuskegee Airmen’s Airman

    117121, Digital Color Postmark, $1.85.
    117131, Stamp Deck Card, $0.95.
    117132, Stamp Deck Card w/ Digital Color Postmark, $2.20.

    Customers may view the C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson stamp, as well as many of this year’s other stamps, on Facebook at facebook.com/USPSStamps, on Twitter @USPSstamps or on the website uspsstamps.com, the Postal Service’s online site for information on upcoming stamp subjects, first-day-of-issue events and other philatelic news.

    # # #


    For reporters interested in speaking with a regional Postal Service public relations professional, please go to about.usps.com/news/media-contacts/usps-local-media-contacts.pdf.

    Follow us on twitter.com/USPS and like us at facebook.com/USPS. For more information about the Postal Service, go to usps.com and usps.com/postalfacts.


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    “BREATH OF FREEDOM”


    - Premiering Smithsonian Channel on Monday, February 17, 2014 at 8:00 pm ET/PT -

    BRIEF DESCRIPTION: They fought to liberate Germany from Nazi rule, as racism reached unfathomable levels. Their fight would continue back home on American soil. This is the story of the one-million-plus African Americans who fought in World War II. Discover their encounters with hatred, from the enemy and from within their own ranks. This new documentary looks at the Civil Rights Movement through the eyes of African-American WWII vets, whose experiences offer a unique perspective on racism, abroad and at home. Explore this paradoxical chapter in American history through interviews with war heroes, including COLIN POWELL, Tuskegee ace pilot ROSCOE BROWN, and CHARLES EVERS, brother of Civil Rights activist and WWII veteran Medgar Evers.


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    What’s Happening to the American Military?
    By: Frank Vernuccio
    Editor-in-Chief of the NY Analysis of Policy & Government


    Americans have always debated how much to spend on defense. The current Administration’s apparent disdain of the military itself, however, is an unprecedented development.

    It’s well known that the White House is determined to continue slashing the already sharply reduced military budget. One immediate effect has been the removal of vitally needed funds for training. General Ray Odierno, the Army’s chief of staff, has admitted that there has been no substantial training in the six months prior to September 30. Because of this, according to Odierno, only two Army brigades are currently combat-ready, less than a third of the minimum number necessary to protect the nation.

    The crisis also extends to our sea power.

    The Navy has stated that America’s vital forward defense, our aircraft carrier force, has now been reduced to nine vessels. 11 is the widely accepted minimum number needed for safety. As this column has previously reported, these latest decreases come on top of massive reductions already in place. The U.S. navy has shrunk from 600 ships to 284, the Air Force from 37 combat air wings to 20, and the U.S. army from 18 divisions to 10.

    Most frighteningly, the U.S. nuclear deterrent has aged and shrunk to the point of being potentially unreliable, while our adversaries—the Russians and the Chinese—have spent enormous sums modernizing and expanding their atomic and ICBM arsenals.

    The once promising U.S. missile defense program, initiated by President Reagan, has yet to be fully developed. President Obama has been virulent in his opposition to this life-, indeed, nation-saving technology that could deter a missile attack on American civilians. During his first presidential campaign, he famously advocated reducing more funds from the program than were actually allocated to it.

    As more nations, and potentially terrorists organizations, acquire nuclear technology, including North Korea and Iran, both of whom have sworn to use such weapons against the U.S., this is a policy error of the highest magnitude. During his second presidential campaign, Mr. Obama was caught on an open microphone promising Russia’s Medvedev that he would be “more flexible” in a key weapons issue after his re-election, surely one of the first times a U.S. President felt more comfortable being honest with a Russian leader about military matters than with his own constituents.

    There is sufficient evidence that top military commanders who have expressed their dissatisfaction with White House defense policies have been punished for their honesty. There are repeated reports about top generals and admirals being replaced, detrimentally reassigned, or compelled to resign for all sorts of unconvincing reasons, none actually related to the performance of their duties.

    A WND report notes that top generals and admirals describe the Obama Administrations’ removal of nine generals and admirals this year alone as a “purge.” It’s a process that begin almost immediately after President Obama took office in 2009. Within months of moving into the Oval Office, he sacked General David McKiernan, the general in charge of the Afghanistan war. Then he fired his replacement, General McChrystal. He fired his chief of intelligence, General David Petraeus. General John Allen, another key Afghanistan figure, resigned unexpectedly.

    General Carter Ham was fired shortly after the White House refused to allow a rescue mission to save the U.S. ambassador in the Benghazi incident. Similarly, Admiral David Gaurette, in charge of the John C. Stennis Aircraft Carrier group in the middle east, was relieved in the wake of the disaster for similar reasons. Speculation runs high that both men protested Obama’s lack of action. Marine General James Cartwright has also been harassed into resigning.

    Chiefs involved with the U.S. nuclear deterrent that have been dismissed include Vice Admiral Tim Giardina and Major General Michael Carey. Some retired leaders also state they are harassed in their new civilian jobs following criticism of White House actions.

    Other odd policies also smack of an anti-military attitude on the part of the Oval Office. These include decisions such as harassing Christian chaplains, a short-lived attempt to label evangelicals as “extremists” and seminars portraying legitimate political groups that disagree with the President as “terrorists.” Specific steps have been taken to detrimentally affect morale. Examples include eliminating the Navy’s traditional “don’t tread on me” insignia, and the Marines dress cap.

    As noted by a number of observers, there is significant irony in the labeling of Tea Party followers—who advocate adherence to the U.S. Constitution and who have been known mostly for their political activism advocating adherence to American law and tradition-- as “terrorists” by the same presidential administration that referred to the incident in which Nidal Hassan, the Muslim Fort Hood army psychiatrist who shot 13 soldiers, as “workplace violence.”

    These are dangerous actions, made all the more so because they have been done without any input from the legislative branch or discussion with the public.


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    (BPRW) U.S. ARMY PARTNERSHIP WITH THURGOOD MARSHALL COLLEGE FUND PROMOTES OPPORTUNITIES FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS


    (BLACK PR WIRE) – Alexandria, Va. (Apr. 29, 2013) — The U.S. Army and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) have completed a cooperative arrangement designed to ensure students have greater access to the education, resources and training necessary to become leaders in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) related Army career fields.

    Through this innovative outreach program, developed jointly between the U.S. Army Cadet Command and TMCF, TMCF representatives worked with more than 452 high schools, community based organizations and other local groups to provide information about the U.S. Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corp (ROTC) program. The outreach program, piloted in New York City, Los Angeles and Richmond-Petersburg, Va., was conducted between September 2012 and March 2013.

    Over the six month campaign, TMCF representatives provided information to more than 628 school administrators, counselors, parents and students. The information highlighted the two-, three- or four-year Army ROTC scholarship available to high-achieving students. Army ROTC scholarships are awarded based on student merit and grades and include up to full tuition scholarships, option for room and board in place of tuition, additional allowances for books and fees for Cadets, as well as a monthly living allowance.

    Those interested in learning more about Army ROTC were directed to a TMCF-Army program website and were then contacted by Army ROTC representatives. The program goal is to identify and attract students with a 3.7 high school cumulative GPA; minimum scores of 1260 SAT and 27 ACT; and a varsity letter winner or equivalent athletic achievement.

    “Identifying top quality scholar-athlete-leaders (SALs) is critical to the strength of our Army, and our nation,” said Maj. Gen. Jeff Smith, commander of U.S. Army Cadet Command and Fort Knox. “Together with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, we’re working to address the shortage of African American students pursuing careers in STEM, and giving students an opportunity to become our nation’s next generation of exceptional leaders, whether as active duty Army officers or through the U.S. Army Reserve or Army National Guard as citizen-soldiers.”

    With careers in STEM related fields projected to grow by 29 percent between 2010 and 2020, the Army and TMCF share a commitment to preparing minority students for academic and career success.

    "TMCF is committed to creating the next generation of leaders within the STEM fields. This program with the U.S. Army has given us the opportunity to expand our mission to high schools as we prepare to launch our new High School to Higher Education (H2H) Program. Preparing students at the K-12 level is critical and partnerships and innovative programs like this will create a new pipeline of talented students to our member-schools,” said Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., President and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

    College graduates in the STEM fields can chart technology careers in the U.S. Army. As one of the nation’s largest providers of college scholarships, the U.S. Army has provided more than $10 million to students at HBCUs. Further, the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has formed close working arrangements with Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) to provide research programs and internships that address the projected shortfall of scientists and engineers among diverse communities.

    TMCF supports and represents nearly 300,000 students attending its 47 member-schools that include public Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), medical and law schools.

    To learn about and apply for Army ROTC scholarships, please visit www.goarmy.com/rotc. To learn more about Thurgood Marshall College Fund programs and scholarship opportunities, please visit www.thurgoodmarshallcollegefund.org.

    About AMRG: The Army Marketing and Research Group (AMRG) is the U.S. Army's national marketing, marketing research and analysis and accessions analysis organization. The AMRG develops innovative and effective ways to: connect with the American public and make the Army more accessible and understood; increase awareness of both the benefits and value of Army service; and motivate the most qualified candidates to choose the Army as their service of first choice.

    Contact Information
    Sonya Lewis
    708.439.0326 (mobile)
    Sonya.Lewis@carolhwilliams.com

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    African American Diversity Cultural Center Hawaii


    Candlelight Vigil in Memory of Military Men who lost their lives at West Loch Pearl Harbor on May 21, 1944 at State Capitol Grounds Ewa Side Sunday, May 19, 2013 time: 5:45 pm


    We invite Boy & Girl Scouts, Choirs (churches & schools) sororities, fraternities and other community organizations to honor the memory of hundreds of young men who lost their lives when a maritime accident occurred during preparation for the invasion of the Mariana Islands during WWII. These men are buried in graves "Marked Unknown West Loch Pearl Harbor May 21, 1944" in the National Memorial Cemetery.

    On Tuesday, May 21, 2013 AADCCH in collaboration with Hawaii Joint Military Forces Celebrates the Life & Memory of West Loch Internees at 3:00pm with full military honors.








    African American Stevedore workers at Pearl Harbor Naval Base



    Artie Wilson & Adm. Frank Ponds


    Our mailing address is:
    1311 Kapiolani Boulevard, Suite 203/207
    Honolulu, Hawaii 96814
    Telephone: 808-597-1341
    www.aadcch.org

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    HAPPY VETERANS DAY 2012!:


    http://moveonup.ning.com/profiles/blogs/veterans-are-americas-common-thread?xg_source=activity

    HAPPY VETERANS DAY
    Veterans are a common strand that runs through the fabric of America!

    Their deeds inspired me as a boy.

    Their deeds inspire me today as a man.

    We owe them everything yet they demand no special attention nor treatment.

    Veterans are a common thread that runs through the fabric of America,

    They are the thread that keeps the fabric of America from unraveling, whether they are recruits; active duty ; guard; reserve or retired.

    Cap Black, The Hood Conservative
    (504) 214-3082

    Help Cap Black Promote Patriotism! http://www.indiegogo.com/capblackhelp?show_todos=true&a=1298821

    " Be your OWN Superhero!"

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    New Yosemite And Sequoia National Parks Tour Keeps History Of America’s “Buffalo Soldiers” Alive


    - Filmmaker Ken Burns And Leading Tour Operator Tauck Tell The Story Of Pioneering African-American Soldiers -

    NORWALK, CT (May 7, 2012) Award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns is working with Tauck, one of the world’s top tour operators, to tell the story of America’s Buffalo Soldiers as part of a new Tauck itinerary that explores San Francisco and the National Parks of Northern California, including Yosemite, Sequoia and Kings Canyon. The history of the Buffalo Soldiers in the parks is one of several cultural narratives that Tauck will highlight in its new, all-inclusive, 8-day guided journey, “Yosemite And Sequoia: John Muir’s California.” Other themes weaving through the Tauck itinerary include the story of visionary naturalist John Muir and the creation of America’s National Parks system.

    The Buffalo Soldiers were African-American U.S. Army troops who served in the American West and elsewhere during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Native American in origin, the term “Buffalo Soldier” has been attributed variously to the soldiers’ fierce fighting ability, and to the resemblance of the soldiers’ hair to a tuft of fur found atop the heads of buffalos.

    Tour Operator Tauck
    What is more firmly established is that Buffalo Soldiers from the 9th Cavalry and 24th Infantry were garrisoned in San Francisco’s Presidio in 1899, shortly after Yosemite and Sequoia were established as national parks. Seeking to protect the parks’ resources in the era before park rangers, the Army deployed the Buffalo Soldiers to the parks to prevent illegal grazing and poaching, discourage timber thieves and serve a host of other functions. Performing admirably despite having little official authority, the Buffalo Soldiers endured long hours in the saddle, separation from home and family, and the overt racism common to the era.

    According to filmmaker Burns, the Buffalo Soldiers had “the very complicated and difficult task of trying to take care of this place, being African-Americans in a country that had just freed the slaves, but was not yet sure what the African-American role would be in our society.” Burns, who created the award-winning documentary series “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea,” sees the story of the Buffalo Soldiers as a way of weaving African-American history into the National Parks experience.

    “We’ve had in the United States a very complicated history with race, obviously. But what we’ve tended to leave out is the story of African-Americans, not as a separate part of our national narrative, but interwoven with it,” said Burns. “The significance of the Buffalo Soldiers is a way for African-Americans to say, ‘We are part of this history,’ ‘We have been part of this history.’ They are – in fact – a huge part of the history. And with regards to the National Parks, they are crucial.”

    Tauck’s “Yosemite And Sequoia: John Muir’s California” itinerary begins with two nights in San Francisco, where guided sightseeing will include a visit to the historic Presidio where the Buffalo Soldiers were garrisoned. At the Presidio, Tauck guests will learn of the Buffalo Soldiers’ roots in the post-Civil War era, their service with Teddy Roosevelt’s “Rough Riders” in Cuba, and their role in the Philippine-American War. In Sequoia National Park. Tauck guests will hear the story of Buffalo Soldiers commander Charles Young, the third African-American to graduate from West Point and the first to oversee one of America’s National Parks. Guests will also get Burns’s own personal perspectives on the Buffalo Soldiers during a special 20-minute film produced exclusively for Tauck, featuring interview footage with Burns and special excerpts from his National Parks documentary.

    A SPECIAL PRESENTATION BY PARK RANGER SHELTON JOHNSON
    A true highlight for many guests on the Tauck journey will take place in Yosemite National Park, when they have the opportunity to “meet” a Buffalo Soldier as portrayed by Shelton Johnson. An African-American Park Ranger and Buffalo Soldiers expert, Johnson is an author and educator who has been awarded the National Park Service’s highest honor for ranger interpretation. Johnson was prominently featured in the Burns National Parks documentary, and his “in-character,” interpretive presentation is a special Tauck-exclusive experience.

    Tauck’s Yosemite tour (from $4,290 per person, double-occupancy, plus airfare) begins with a two-night stay at The Weston St. Francis in San Francisco, complete with guided sightseeing. The itinerary next includes a pair of two-night stays at “inside-the-park” lodges in Sequoia and Yosemite National Parks (with daily sightseeing and other activities), before concluding with a final night at the Fairmont San Francisco.

    Those interested in more information should contact their local travel professional, call Tauck at 1 800 468 2825, or visit www.tauck.com.

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BLACKS/AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE MILITARY
   

  1. African American Civil War Memorial Freedom Foundation and Museum ...
    The first and only national memorial and museum for United States colored troops in the civil war.

  2. African Americans in the Military...
    African Americans in the Military, Blacks in the Armed Forces, - The Classic Collection.

  3. African American Sailors in the Civil War Union Navy ...
    A database detailing the lives and service of more than 18,000 men and women of African descent who served in the U.S. Navy throughout the Civil War era.

  4. AfriGeneas Military Research Forum...
    Ninteenth century Black military heroes.

  5. Blacks in the Military...
    Significant African-American regiments serving in the military before the integration of the armed forces.

  6. Blacks in the Military...
    Website about Blacks in the Military.

  7. Civil War Soldiers and Sailor System...
    Civil War Soldiers and Sailor System website.

  8. Glory and the 54th Massachusetts Infantry...
    Filmposters.com specializes in authentic, original movie posters and Hollywood memorabilia.

  9. Henry Ossian Flipper...
    The Colored Cadet at West Point. Autobiography of Lieut. Henry Ossian Flipper, U. S. A., First Graduate of Color from the U. S. Military Academy.

  10. Number of Blacks Joining Military Down...
    The number of blacks joining the military has plunged by more than one-third since the Afghanistan and Iraq wars began.

  11. StrategyPage.com...
    Whites Replacing Blacks in U.S. Army military news military intelligence military affairs.

  12. Success Story: Blacks in the Military...
    Blacks occupy more management positions in the military than in any other sector of American society.

  13. The Army of Black Liberation...
    “Red Tails,” George Lukas’s action movie celebrates the path-breaking Tuskegee Airmen, the African-American fighter pilots who earned distinction in the European Theater of World War II.

  14. The Color Of Combat...
    The Minority-Disproportion Myth.

  15. The Tuskegee Airmen...
    Honoring the accomplishments and perpetuating the history of African-Americans who participated in air crew, ground crew and operations support training in the Army Air Corps during WWII.

  16. U.S. Colored Troops...
    U.S. Colored Troops information.

  17. World War II African American Medal of Honor Recipients...
    No African American soldier was awarded the Medal of Honor during World War II. On 13 January 1997, President Clinton awarded seven men, six posthumously, the Medal of Honor for their exploits during World War II.

  18. 34th Regiment Infantry United States Colored Troops ...
    The Second South Carolina Volunteers (Colored), later the 34th Regiment Infantry United States Colored Troops.











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