blast from the past

blast from the past
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks




  Navigation:   Features:


  Year by Year Search
update information




divider of content




divider of content


divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
divider for amazing blacks
annual hamite award

OUR HAMITE AWARD WINNER FOR 1870:
Hiram R. Revels
    Hiram R. Revels was born a free man in the year 1827 with North Carolina being his place of birth. When he was about ten years old, he traveled to Lincolnton, North Carolina to apprentice under his older brother, Elias B. Revels in a barber shop. After Elias Revels died in 1841 the widow gave the store to Hiram.

    He had to be a well matured minded boy because he was only 14 at this age. He was also attending and studying at a seminary and in time became an ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME). He tells the story of how he was imprisoned once for preaching to the Negros in Missouri.

    Revels was relatively new in the community at Natchez, Mississippi, where he settled with his wife and five daughters as pastor in charge of the A.M.E.

    Up to that point Revels had never voted, made a political speech or attended a political meeting, but just for the fact he was black, folks assumed him to be a Republican. Revels was also a brilliant man among his people, being born free without any obstacles to education and this is what helped to qualify him for political office.

    During Reconstruction, Revels was elected alderman in Natchez in 1868. And later was elected to represent Adams County in the Mississippi State Senate. In January 1870, Revels presented the opening prayer in the state legislature and won over many with his dynamic and classy style. It was very obvious to those in attendance the remarkable qualities this man possessed.

    In 1870 Revels was elected by a vote of 81-15 in the Mississippi State Senate to finish the term of one of the state's two seats in the US Senate, which had been left vacant since the Civil War. Previously, it had been held by Albert G. Brown, who withdrew from the US Senate in 1861 when Mississippi seceded.

    When Revels arrived in Washington, DC, Southern Democrats didn't want him seated in the Senate. Even after losing the Civil War, they held onto those racist qualities. For the two days of debate, the Senate galleries were packed with spectators at this historic event.

    On February 25, 1870, Revels, on a strict party-line vote of 48-8, with only Republicans voting in favor and only Democrats voting against, became the first African American to be seated in the United States Senate. Spectators in the galleries stood to their feet to see him sworn in.

    To showcase once again the Negro's forgiving nature, the Radical Republicans called for continued punishment of ex-Confederates, but as Senator, Revel's was willing to make peace by providing amnesty and a restoration of full citizenship, hoping this would promote reconciliation.

    But hateful racist people like the white Southerners wouldn't have understood the gesture because they were just plain evil, focused on one thing, exercising hate with their white supremacy theory. Twisted in their thinking and reasoning, the white Southerners actually would have respected Revels more if he had chosen to punish them.

    Revels' term lasted one year. He quietly, and persistently worked for equality of his race of people. Revels had resigned a couple of months before his term expired to preside as president over Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College, which was a historically black college located in Claiborne County, Mississippi.

    Revels remained active as a Methodist Episcopal minister in Holly Springs, Mississippi and became an elder in the Upper Mississippi District. Hiram Revels died on January 16, 1901, while attending a church conference in Aberdeen, Mississippi. We would like to take this moment to honor a man who lived in unsettling times, but under a hostile environment he still chose to show mercy and love toward his enemy.

    Through this website, time and time again we are privileged to learn and witness proud African-Americans who have to lead their lives to the true meaning of America. We award this special person, Hiram Rhodes Revels with the 1870 Hamite Award because of his life of service in helping others, and even though many of it's privileged citizens had given up on a genuine and principled America, Hiram still believed in Her.

annual hamite award
Hiram Rhodes Revels
photo#110


annual hamite award
Drawing from Harper's Weekly (New York) April 9, 1870, showing Jefferson Davis and Hiram Revels. Davis had been a senator from Mississippi until 1861.
photo#111



Our Faded History: Hiram Revels




divider for amazing blacks


How were blacks feeling in 1870?
happy mood of blacks
We are enjoying our freedom more and more with each passing day. We are still concerned about the attitudes of the whites in the South. It seems like they have a built in hatred for our race. It was beautiful to see this year of 1870 a True American elected to the United States Senate.

Hiram R. Revels really made our hearts feel proud. There are many good white people hoping for our success, but there were also many hateful anti-Americans wishing against it. We just hope in the long run, right will prevail over wrong. Can you believe it? The Negro now officially has the right to vote and trust me, we are going to try to use it for the betterment of our race.

Thomas Mundy Peterson was the first black man to take advantage of this excellent opportunity by casting the first vote. People are excited about learning and becoming good American citizens. We finally get a chance to see what's in those books the white people have been keeping from us all these years. The Department of Justice was created this year, and we hope they will live up to their name, we don't want much, just a level playing field is all.



divider for amazing blacks


african american first

 For the year 1870:
  • Thomas Mundy Peterson was the first African American to vote in an election under the 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution, granting voting rights regardless of race.

  • Richard Theodore Greener was the first African American to graduate from Harvard College.

  • Senator Hiram Rhodes Revels (R-Miss.) was the first African American elected to either chamber of the U.S. Congress in the month of January.

  • Joseph Rainey (R-S.C.) was the first African American elected to U.S. House of Representatives in the month of December.



divider for amazing blacks


blacks playing marbles

Octavius Catto
Octavius Valentine Catto
photo #121-yr-1863

      Sports in 1870
    Trivia:
  • Blacks were not accepted into the league baseball games, so they started their teams, becoming professional by the the 1870s. The first known baseball game between two black teams was held on November 15, 1859, in New York City. The Henson Base Ball Club of Jamaica, Queens, defeated the Unknowns of Weeksville, Brooklyn, 54 to 43.

    By the end of the 1860s, the black baseball mecca was Philadelphia, which had an African-American population of 22,000. Two former cricket players, James H. Francis and Francis Wood, formed the Pythian Base Ball Club. They played in Camden, New Jersey, at the landing of the Federal Street Ferry, because it is hard to get permits for black baseball games in the city. Octavius Catto, the promoter of the Pythians, decided to apply for membership in the National Association of Base Ball Players, frequently a matter of sending delegates to the annual convention; beyond that, a formality.

    At the end of the 1867 season "the National Association of Baseball Players voted to exclude any club with a black player." In some ways Blackball thrived under segregation, with the few black teams of the day playing not only each other but white teams as well. "Black teams earned the bulk of their income playing white independent 'semipro' clubs."


  • The mistreatment and segregation of Blacks didn't only happen in the South, but also the Northern cities like Philadelphia.



  • Octavius Valentine Catto was a black educator, intellectual, and civil rights activist in Philadelphia. As a man, he also became known as a top cricket and black baseball pioneer in 19th-century Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.



divider for amazing blacks


Freedmen's school
The Misses Cooke's school room, Freedman's Bureau, Richmond, VA.
photo #109-yr-1866

Freedmen's school
Freedmen's school?, South Carolina. African-American children, mainly girls, with adult women, possibly teachers.
photo #100-yr-1865

Reconstruction in 1870

    Freedmen's Bureau:
    The Freedmen's Bureau began in 1865. Its purpose was to assist former black slaves from a life of slavery to the free labor system. The Bureau provided assistance in medical needs, housing, food, school and also legal aid. The Bureau helped people find lost family and taught them to read and write so they could better themselves. Oliver Otis Howard who was a Union general, was appointed the commissioner of the bureau in May 1865.

    You have to remember during slavery days it was illegal in many states to teach blacks to read and write, so the Freedmen's Bureau had their hands full in assisting these illiterate former slaves into the American mainstream. They're many corrupt and insincere Bureau agents who along with white Southerners fought against Bureau successes every step of the way, but they are also honest Bureau officials who wanted to help and assist blacks in bettering themselves.

    Congress realized the Bureau was needed for a longer period of time and sought to extend it with opposition from white Southerners and a powerful new ally, President, Andrew Johnson who vetoed the bill because he felt the Bureau showed preference to one race over another and wouldn't help in making blacks independent.

    Andrew Johnson didn't care for blacks. He gave former Confederates back their land lost in the war and fired Bureau agents he felt were too partial to the black cause. It was like Johnson was saying to the South, "OK we fought a war and it's over, but we are not going to let a Negro tear us apart, it's time to heal. Screw the Negro! We whites have to stick together! He also was against every bill that came to his desk that would help blacks. His veto was later overridden by Congress, and the Bureau was extended a while longer, but not for long because it was dismantled by Congress in 1872.

    After the Bureau shut down, and with some political setbacks for Republicans who were sympathetic to the black cause, Negroes were left to fend for themselves. But in an extraordinary display of unity and devotion to a common thread, the North and South put aside their differences to protect their shared interest, which was the union of the United States which meant for them wealth and prosperity in their pursuit of happiness, clothed in white skin under the banner of distorted American principles with the exclusion of the Negro from both North and South. WHEW! That's a Negro mouthful, but true. This display of unity and exclusion would hopefully serve future blacks well to learn from.

    Why had American principles become distorted?

    Even before slavery formally began, American principle stated "all men are created equal" and had a right to the pursuit of personal happiness. Slavery goes against American principles and the two can't co-exist. Abraham Lincoln himself was quoted as saying, "If slavery isn't wrong, then nothing is wrong" and to his credit and vision for a United and Strong America, the Reconstruction Amendments were introduced.

    But laws have microscopic power over the motivations of a person's heart. White unprincipled Southerners didn't even attempt to join the new American spirit of things, aligning themselves as proud anti-American just as they had done by trying to secede in the Civil War. They fought tooth and nail against equality for the Negro.

    During slavery, the dependence on free black labor had transformed these money-hungry, greedy white Southerners into a hateful white SLAVE POWER who had to be stopped at all cost. This Slave Power wanted to expand slavery to new territories, but the North took a stand, and this is what started the Civil War, not because Lincoln had a burning desire to free the slaves.

    President Lincoln understood the motives of the Slave Power were against American principles and fought the war because of it.

    OH MIGHTY, MIGHTY SLAVE POWER you have indeed caused alot of pain and misery! Crazy terrorist maniac, didn't your mama teach you better?

greedy white southerners
Has A True and Principled America Simply Become An Idea
That's Too Lofty For Human Beings To Follow?


The Repulsive Slave Power That Was Intertwined With Slavery,
Along With it's Peoples and Racist Beliefs Were Wounded in The Civil War,
But Not Completely Destroyed, And Were Allowed To Thrive.
Would This Come Back To Haunt America With Bad Race Relations,
Between It's Black and White American Citizens?


only time will tell my friends


Oliver Otis Howard
Oliver Otis Howard, commissioner of The Freedmen's Bureau
photo#111-yr-1866
Trivia: Howard University was named for General Oliver Otis Howard, who was both the founder of the University and, at the time, Commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. Howard later served as President of the university from 1869–74.

Harriet Tubman
Abolitionists Harriet Tubman
photo #112- yr-1866

annual hamite award
Susie Taylor
photo #104- yr-1864

Carpetbagger
Carpetbagger
photo #100-yr-1865

annual hamite award
Hiram Rhodes Revels
photo#110-yr-1870

    Now with the re-building of America at hand and much money to be made, who would profit? Previously the North had noble motives in helping these millions of former slaves transition into the mainstream but after political losses and resistance from white Southerners they eventually aligned themselves with these unprincipled anti-Americans because of skin color and shared money interest and ignored the continued assistance needed in helping their black skin brothers.

    With the dismantlement of the Freedmen's Bureau, America officially had over four million black nomads attempting to find their way in a hostile and prejudice land. Well at least the North could say they tried if this would soothe the conscience. This time in history was the foundation for future race relations, and a good solid foundation was not laid. The North gave up the fight too quickly and passed a terrible situation to future generations.

    By now we're sure the Negro has to wonder to himself if America is being undermined and distorted at this point in history? Is something shady going on? Abraham Lincoln understood how this could happen and lost his life attempting to protect real justice, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for all Americans.


    How Were Former Slaves Feeling At This Time In History?

    Please consider a quote from a person who was there. Susie Taylor, our 1864 Hamite Award winner.

    "For two hundred years we had toiled for them; the war of 1861 came and was ended, and we thought our race was forever freed from bondage, and that the two races could live in unity with each other, but when we read almost every day of what is being done to my race by some whites in the South, I sometimes ask, "Was the war in vain? Has it brought freedom, in the full sense of the word, or has it not made our condition more hopeless?"


    Carpetbaggers:
    Carpetbaggers were mostly well-educated, middle-class white Northerners who were called Carpetbaggers because of the fancy luggage most carried. Carpetbaggers would travel to areas of the south to assist in the rebuilding during and after the civil war. (1865-1877)

    They assisted the abolitionists in teaching former black slaves to read and write among other things. White Southerners didn't like carpetbaggers because they felt they were money hungry and greedy opportunist, which in many cases were true.

    Many carpet baggers would buy former plantations at low prices and hire black workers to turn a profit, and was also involved in the politics of rebuilding the south.


    Hiram Rhodes Revels was elected as the first African American to serve in the United States Senate. Revels denounced the carpetbaggers for manipulating the black vote for personal benefit, and for keeping alive wartime hatreds...

    "Since reconstruction, the masses of my people have been, as it were, enslaved in mind by unprincipled adventurers, who, caring nothing for the country, were willing to stoop to anything no matter how infamous, to secure power to themselves, and perpetuate it."


    Abolitionists:
    Abolitionists were no nonsense type of people who recognized injustice and wanted swift action taken to remedy the wrong. They had been around during the American Revolution but became stronger in voice and influence during 1830 - 1870, becoming involved with the Northern churches and politics.

    Abolitionists were whites and blacks who hated slavery and wanted it immediately outlawed. Other anti-slavery movements sought a gradual change from slavery to freedom, or to restrict slavery in parts of the United States and prevent it from spreading further.

    Free African-Americans (before the Emancipation Proclamation) also played a role in the movement, but enslaved blacks such as Harriet Tubman had a more dangerous mission for fear of getting caught and punished and very possibly killed.





divider for amazing blacks


african immigrants out-perform other ethnic groups

Education of Slaves
Education of Slaves photo #105-yr-1865

Education in 1870

  • 1870 - In the Reconstruction era, with carpetbaggers, mission societies, along with The Freedmen’s Bureau opened 1,000 schools across the South for black children. Schooling was a high priority for the Freedmen, and the enrollments were high and enthusiastic.

  • 1870 - The Quaker's had much influence, they convinced The legislature in Pennsylvania to pass laws to assist in the education of the poor and advocated successfully for African-American kids to attend the same school with whites.

  • 1870 - The 1870 census bureau reports that 81% of African-Americans in the US were illiterate and that was compared to 8.5% of white Americans. Also 9.1% of African-American children attend school and that was compared to 50% of white Americans children.

  • 1870 to 1880 - Rates of African American school attendance increased significantly.

  • Richard T. Greener becomes the first African American undergraduate to graduate from Harvard University.

  • The Preparatory High School for Colored Youth opens in Washington, D.C. It is the first public high school for African Americans in the nation.



divider for amazing blacks


The Fifteenth Amendment. Celebrated May 19th, 1870
The Fifteenth Amendment. Celebrated May 19th, 1870
photo #106

 Ulysses Grant
Ulysses Grant
photo #107-yr-1869

Democratic donkey
Nast cartoon of Democratic donkey, from "Harper's Weekly", January 19th 1870
photo #112-yr-1870

Thomas Peterson
Thomas Mundy Peterson
photo #106-yr-1904

African American men registering to vote
African American men registering to vote in 1870.
photo #101

Alonzo Jacob Ransier
Alonzo Jacob Ransier
photo #102-yr-1882

     Political Scene in 1870
  • 1870 - Ulysses S. Grant was the 18th President of the United States (1869–77). As Commanding General, Grant worked closely with President Abraham Lincoln to lead the Union Army to victory over the Confederacy in the American Civil War. He implemented Congressional Reconstruction, often at odds with Lincoln's successor, Andrew Johnson. Analysis: Ulysses S. Grant was a President that understood and enforced the U.S. Constitution. He lobbied for the 15th Amendment, giving blacks the right to vote. He was also a firm believer in Reconstruction Aid and Civil Rights to the Negro, opposite of his predecessor, Andrew Johnson.


  • The (above image) a celebration of the Fifteenth Amendment (right to vote) and showing the grand May 19, 1870 parade in Baltimore.

    The float is followed by a troop of Zouave drummers, two rows of men in top hats (some wearing sashes), as well as ranks of troops and other floats. The parade scene is surrounded by several vignettes. In the upper corners appear bust portraits of President Ulysses S. Grant (left corner) and Vice President Schuyler S. Colfax.

    In the top center are three black leaders: Martin Robinson Delany, author and the first black major in the U.S. Army; abolitionist and U.S. marshal for the District of Columbia Frederick Douglass; and Mississippi senator Hiram Rhoades Revels.

    At the sides are (left, top to bottom) a young black man reading the Emancipation Proclamation, three black men with Masonic sashes and banners ("We Unite in the Bonds of Fellowship with the Whole Human Race"), an open Bible ("Our Charter of Rights"), and a bust portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In the lower left corner is a classroom scene in a black school, labeled "Education Will Prove the Equality of the Races." In the lower right corner, a black pastor preaches to his congregation, with the motto "The Holy Ordinances of Religion Are Free" below.

    To the right of the central scene are (top to bottom): two free blacks who "till our own fields;" a black officer commanding his troops ("We Will Protect Our Country as It Defends Our Rights"); a bust portrait of John Brown; and a black man reading to his family ("Freedom Unites the Family Circle"). The bottom row shows three more scenes (left to right): a black wedding ceremony ("Liberty Protects the Marriage Altar"); a black man voting ("The Ballot Box Is Open To Us"); and Senator Revels in the House of Representatives ("Our Representative Sits in the National Legislature"). Kelly, the publisher, also issued a much smaller version of the print (no. 1870-5).


  • Thomas Mundy Peterson of Perth Amboy, New Jersey was the first African-American to vote in an election under the just-enacted provisions of the 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution. His vote was cast on March 31, 1870.

  • Senator Hiram Rhodes Revels (R-Miss.) was the first African American elected to either chamber of the U.S. Congress in the month of January.

  • The Enforcement Act of 1870 enacted May 31, 1870, was an act that restricted the first wave of the groups that made up the Klan. In this Act, the government banned the use of terror, force or bribery to prevent people from voting because of their race. Hundreds of KKK members were arrested and tried as common criminals and terrorists.


  • The cartoons of Thomas Nast 1870 in Harper's Weekly. Cartoonists followed Nast and used the donkey to represent the Democrats, and the elephant to represent the Republicans.


  • Alonzo Jacob Ransier was elected the 54th Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina. He was elected to the Forty-third United States Congress from South Carolina's 2nd Congressional District.




divider for amazing blacks


African Americans in Office 1870–1876
State State Legislator U.S. Senators U.S. Congressmen
Alabama 69 0 4
Arkansas 8 0 0
Florida 30 0 1
Georgia 41 0 1
Louisiana 87 0 1*
Mississippi 112 2 1
North Carolina 30 0 1
South Carolina 190 0 6
Tennessee 1 0 6
Texas 19 0 0
Virginia 46 0 0
Total 633 2 15


divider for amazing blacks


former slaves liked to laugh


divider for amazing blacks


Simkins v Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital
Many African American doctors practiced at black segregated hospitals. The Georgia Infirmary, in the year 1832, was the first segregated black hospital in the United States.

Healthcare in 1870

    It's hard to believe that as recent as the mid-1960s discrimination/segregation was tolerated in most major hospitals in the United States, especially in the South.

    Hospitals were separate for sure but far from being equal. The black section of the hospital was usually in the worst location of the building such as cold and unheated attics and damp basements.

    Black women who entered the midwifery profession were crucial, especially during the time we were denied equal access to quality hospital care. These wonderful women loved their job and often did so out of a spiritual calling. They were often referred to as “granny midwives.”

    A black doctor could only treat black patients. African American professionals were barred from the medical staffs of hospitals and the patients from beds and services, and students didn't fare much better because they were denied access to nurse and residency training programs.

    This all slowly began to change after 1963 with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund landmark case, Simkins v Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital (1963), that challenged the federal government’s use of public funds to expand and maintain segregated hospital care. Simkins became the Brown v Board of Education decision for hospitals.


divider for amazing blacks


The Race Factor


racism

Our goddess of liberty
Our goddess of liberty
photo #105

     Race in 1870
  • Our goddess of liberty. Picture to the left shows profile portraits of probably an Irish woman, (Irish people were heavily discriminated against during this period, many white people felt they were on the same level as blacks) an African woman, a Native American woman, and an Asian woman surrounding a traditional image of Miss Liberty. The title continues: What is she to be? To what complexion are we to come at last!




divider for amazing blacks


black Movies in America
Movies in America

     Movies in 1870
  • February 5, 1870 - The first motion picture is shown to a theater audience, Philadelphia




divider for amazing blacks


famous african american birthdays

George Dixon
George Dixon
photo #113-yr-1870

Robert Sengstacke Abbott
Robert Sengstacke Abbott
photo #114-yr-1870

     Famous Birthdays in 1870
  • July 29, 1870 - George Dixon was a Black Canadian professional boxer and the first black world boxing champion in any weight class, while also being the first ever Canadian-born boxing champion. Ring Magazine founder Nat Fleischer ranked Dixon as the #1 Featherweight of all-time. Trivia: George Dixon is the inventor of Shadowboxing.

  • November 24, 1870 - Robert Sengstacke Abbott  was an African-American lawyer, newspaper publisher and an early African-American Bahá'í. Abbott is the founder of The Chicago Defender newspaper and The Bud Billiken Parade and Picnic.

  • December 5, 1870 - Alexandre Dumas  was a French writer. His response to a man who insulted him about his African ancestry has become famous. Dumas said: My father was a mulatto, my grandfather was a Negro, and my great-grandfather a monkey. You see, Sir, my family starts where yours ends.



divider for amazing blacks


famous african american deaths

Thomas R. Hawkins
Thomas R. Hawkins
photo #115-yr-1870

     Famous Deaths in 1870
  • February 28, 1870 - Thomas R. Hawkins  was a Union Army soldier during the American Civil War and a recipient of America's highest military decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions at the Battle of Chaffin's Farm.



divider for amazing blacks


famous african american weddings

     Famous Weddings in 1870
  • 1870 - Politician Jeremiah Haralson weds Ellen Norwood.



divider for amazing blacks


soul music orgin



divider for amazing blacks


 Jubilee Singers
Members of the Jubilee Singers
nine men and women sitting or standing before the camera
photo #104

Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield
Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield
photo #102-yr-1876

Callender's Colored Minstrels
Plantation scenarios were common in black minstrelsy, as shown here in this poster for Callender's Colored Minstrels.
photo #109-yr-1875

Thomas Wentworth Higginson
During the Civil War, Thomas Wentworth Higginson served as colonel of the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, the first federally authorized black regiment, from 1862–1864. Following the war, Higginson devoted much of the rest of his life to fighting for the rights of freed slaves, women and other disfranchised peoples.
photo #118-yr-1863

John Brown Song
John Brown Song
photo #119-yr-1863

     Music in 1870

  Musical Happenings in 1870:
  • A choir forms at the African American Fisk University - the Fisk Jubilee Singers, who will soon begin touring, bringing spirituals to wider audiences.


  • The 1870s was a decade where the only way to obtain music was on sheet music sold in stores. People would sit at the piano and sing.


  • Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield dubbed "The Black Swan", was an African-American singer considered the best-known black concert artist of her time. She was noted by James M. Trotter for her "remarkably sweet tones and wide vocal compass". She toured and conducted a Philadelphia music studio. Among her voice pupils was Thomas Bowers, who became known as "The Colored Mario" and "The American Mario" for the similarity of his voice to Italian opera tenor Giovanni Mario.



  • One or two African-American troupes dominated the scene for much of the late 1860s and 1870s. The first of these was Brooker and Clayton's Georgia Minstrels, who played the Northeast around 1865. Sam Hague's Slave Troupe of Georgia Minstrels formed shortly thereafter and toured England to great success beginning in 1866. In the 1870s, white entrepreneurs bought most of the successful black companies. Charles Callender obtained Sam Hague's troupe in 1872 and renamed it Callender's Georgia Minstrels. They became the most popular black troupe in America, and the words Callender and Georgia came to be synonymous with the institution of black minstrelsy.


  • Thomas Wentworth Higginson:
  • Thomas Wentworth Higginson leads the First South Carolina Colored Volunteers, the first group of authorized African American soldiers. Higginson is a notable author who helps popularize many aspects of African American music. He contributed to the preservation of Negro spirituals by copying dialect verses and music he heard sung around the regiment's campfires.


  • John Brown's Song:
  • is a United States marching song about the abolitionist John Brown. The song was popular in the Union during the American Civil War.


  • "Juba Juba", a popular song about the Juba:

    Juba dis and Juba dat,
    and Juba killed da yellow cat,
    You sift the meal and ya gimme the husk,
    you bake the bread and ya gimme the crust,
    you eat the meat and ya gimme the skin,
    and that's the way,
    my mama's troubles begin


    A song about the hambone from Step it Down (v.s.):

    Hambone Hambone pat him on the shoulder
    If you get a pretty girl, I'll show you how to hold her.
    Hambone, Hambone, where have you been?
    All 'round the world and back again.
    Hambone, Hambone, what did you do?
    I got a train and I fairly flew.
    Hambone, Hambone where did you go?
    I hopped up to Miss Lucy's door.
    I asked Miss Lucy would she marry me.
    (falsetto)"Well I don't care if Papa don't care!"
    First come in was Mister Snake,
    He crawled all over that wedding cake.
    Next walked in was Mister Tick,
    He ate so much it made him sick.
    Next walked in was Mister Coon,
    We asked him to sing us a wedding tune,
    Now Ham-....
    Now Ham....



  Popular Soul Dances:
  • The Juba or Hambone dance was originally from West Africa. It became an African-American plantation dance that was performed by slaves during their gatherings when no rhythm instruments were allowed due to fear of secret codes hidden in the drumming.

  • Virginia Essence

  • Buck & Wing

  • Tap Dancing

  • Soft Shoe



divider for amazing blacks


pretty lady cooking
Hi there, I'm Annie.
Thanks for viewing my collection of wonderful soul-food dishes that my amazing ancestors cooked, and more than likely yours did too.

We didn't have much of anything back in the day and had to live off the scraps we were given. But like a famous rapper once said in his songs, we knew how to "make a dollar out of 15 cents" Enjoy.



sweet potatoes
Sweet Potatoes / Yams


Barbecue Ribs
Barbecue Ribs


Ham Hocks
Ham Hocks


Rice and Beans
Rice and Beans


Fish and Chips
Fish and Chips


Bean Soup
Bean Soup


Biscuits and Gravy
Biscuits and Gravy


Waffles
Waffles


Fried Chicken
Fried Chicken


Cornbread
Cornbread


Collard Greens
Collard Greens


Fried Liver
Fried Liver


Peach Preserves
Peach Preserves


Pinto Beans
Pinto Beans


Pound Cake
Pound Cake


Pork Chops
Pork Chops


Watermelon
Watermelon


black man hungry


(images - https://pixabay.com/)
Southern Cooking - Soul Food

    Have you ever wondered what African-Americans ate back in the day? Well, maybe we can help you with that. We've found the oldest known black cookbook to date.

    This cookbook was written by an actual former slave woman that had once lived on a plantation, but gained her freedom with the Emancipation Proclamation moving from Mobile, Alabama to San Francisco, California where she published an entirely excellent collection of 160 authentic and tasty recipes of the Old South entitled;

    "What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking"

    This book is indeed a rare gemstone with tons of actual recipes that black folks enjoyed back in the day, but Mrs. Fisher cooking wasn't limited to blacks only, many whites also loved her delicious recipes and persuaded her to make a cookbook.

    Here is just a sample of some of the southern foods mentioned in her book, and by the way, it wasn't called soul-food until the 1960's.

    Breakfast
  • Maryland Beat Biscuit
  • Waffles
  • Cream Cake
  • Flannel Cakes
  • Sallie Lund
  • Egg Corn Bread
  • Plantation Corn Bread
  • Light Bread


  • Broiled Meats
  • Beefsteak
  • Lamb or Mutton Chops
  • Pork Steak or Chops
  • Venison


  • Croquettes
  • Lamb
  • Chicken
  • Crab
  • Liver
  • Oyster
  • Fish


  • Cakes Etc.
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Almond
  • Feather
  • Sponge
  • Fruit
  • Jelly
  • Carolas
  • Ginger Cookies
  • Sweet Wafers


  • Pickels, Sauces Etc.
  • Sweet Cucumber Pickles
  • Sweet Cucumber Mangoes
  • Chow Chow
  • Creole Chow Chow
  • Cherry Chutney
  • Game Sauce
  • Compound Tomato
  • Napoleon
  • Sweet Pickle Peaches
  • Sweet Pickle Prunes
  • Sweet Watermelon Kind Pickle
  • Sauce for Boiled Fish or Mutton
  • Milanese Sauce
  • Sauce for Suet Pudding


  • Pies, Etc.
  • Pastry for making Pies of all kinds
  • Preparing the Fruit for Pies
  • Rhubarb
  • Apple
  • Peach
  • Lemon Pies
  • Cocoanut
  • Cream Apple
  • Sweet Potato
  • Gooseberry and Cherry
  • Light Bread
  • Mince
  • Blackberry Roll
  • Oyster


  • Puddings
  • Snow
  • Plum
  • Corn
  • Corn Fritters
  • Batter
  • Rice
  • Yorkshire
  • Cheese
  • Suet


  • Preserves, Spices, ETC.
  • Brandy Peaches
  • Quince Preserves
  • Syrups for Preserves
  • Preserved Peaches
  • Preserved Pears
  • Currant Jelly
  • Cranberry Jelly
  • Strawberry Jam
  • Raspberry and Currant Jam Combined
  • Marmalade Peach
  • Crab Apple Jelly
  • Blackberry Brandy
  • Blackberry Syrup for Dysentery in Children
  • Preserved Apricots
  • Apple Sauce for Roast Pork
  • Charlotte Eusse
  • Spiced Currants
  • Preserved Cherries


  • Roast Meats
  • Venison
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Pig
  • Veal
  • Turkey
  • Chicken
  • Birds
  • Quail
  • Domestic Duck
  • Wild Duck


  • Salads
  • Chicken
  • Veal
  • Lamb
  • Shrimp
  • Crab
  • Meat


  • Sherbets
  • Orange
  • Lemon
  • Pineapple


  • Soups, Chowders, Etc.
  • Beef
  • Ox-TaH
  • Calf 's Head
  • Mock Turtle
  • Green Turtle
  • Oyster Gumbo
  • Ochra Gumbo
  • Old Fashioned Turnip
  • Chicken
  • Corn and Tomato
  • Creole
  • Fish Chowder
  • Chicken Gumbo


  • Miscellaneous
  • Fricassed Chicken
  • Fried Chicken
  • Chicken fried Steak
  • Meat Stews or Entrees
  • Ice Cream
  • Boiled Turkey
  • Beef a la Mode
  • Neckbones
  • Spiced Round
  • Hog Maws
  • Stuffed Ham
  • Lima Beans
  • Jumberlie a Creole Dish
  • Baked Fish
  • Ribs, Beef or Pork
  • Boiled Corn
  • Peach Cobbler
  • Egg Plant Stuffed
  • Chitterlings or "Chitlins"
  • Corned Beef Hash
  • Ladies' Custard
  • Tonic Bitters
  • Terrapin Stew
  • Leaven Biscuit
  • Pap for infant Diet
  • Sorghum Syrup
  • Cracklins
  • Meringue for Pudding
  • Circuit Hash


  • What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking
    Paperback – March, 1995
    by Abby Fisher (Author), Karen Hess (Editor)

    http://www.amazon.com/Fisher-Knows-About-Southern-Cooking/dp/1557094039

 

Southern Jewel Million Dollar Pound Cake
(this recipe is not from Mrs. Fisher cookbook, but has been in Annie's family for generations, it's everyones favorite!)

    Butter: 1 pound
    Sugar: 3 cups
    Eggs: 6
    Milk: 3/4 cup
    Cake Flour: 4 cups (Soft as Silk Cake Flour)
    Baking Powder: 1 teaspoon
    Vanilla Flavor: 1 teaspoon
    Lemon Flavor: 1 teaspoon

    Directions:
    For best results, leave butter and eggs out overnight
    Cream butter well, add sugar and mix until butter and sugar look like whip cream.
    Beat each egg individually and then add with sugar and butter, mix well for at least a couple minutes.
    Add milk and cake flour a little at a time, then add flavorings.
    Spray Pam spray on entire round cake pan, and then add cake batter.
    Bake about 1 hour and 15 minutes at 325.
    Let cake cool for about 30 minutes, and then remove cake from cake pan.



divider for amazing blacks


Young African American woman, full-length portrait, standing
Fashions for young African American women
photo #103-yr-1870

Young African American woman, full-length portrait, standing
Fashions for young African American women
photo #103a-yr-1870

Unidentified African American man
Stylish clothes for African American men
photo #107-yr-1870

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly The person who drew this Illustration was kind to black people. Usually during that time period they would portray the Negro with wild hair and humongous noses with exaggerated lips. They made us look normal. Thank you Harper's.
photo #101-yr-1869

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly
photo #101-yr-1869

 African American men and  womens fashion in 1800s
Couples attending the Negro Labor Convention
Illustration from Harper's Weekly
photo #101-yr-1869

      Fashions in 1870

  Popular Fashions:

  • For women by 1870, fullness in the skirt had moved to the rear, where elaborately draped overskirts were held in place by tapes and supported by a bustle. This fashion required an underskirt, which was heavily trimmed with pleats, flounces, rouching, and frills.


  • Innovations in men's fashion of the 1870s included the acceptance of patterned or figured fabrics for shirts and the general replacement of neckties tied in bow knots with the four-in-hand and later the Ascot tie.

  • Infants continued to be dressed in flowing gowns, a style that continued into the early twentieth century. Gender dress changes often did not occur until a child was five or six. As the girls got older, they wore longer skirts. A four-year-old would wear her skirt at knee length; ten to twelve at mid-calf; and by sixteen, the girls dress would be ankle length. Boys often dressed similar to adult males, as they too wore blazers and Norfolk jackets.



divider for amazing blacks


african americans and religion


How did religion begin for the American Negro?

Well, it was an exciting journey for sure, but as usual, we have to go back into history for the likely answer. Before arriving in America as slaves, generally speaking, our ancestors practiced a religion which included fetishism.

What is fetishism you may ask?


 Traditional  Benin Voodoo Dance
Traditional Benin Voodoo Dance

Fetishism is a man-made object (such as the doll aound the lady's neck in the picture) that is thought to have power over others. Africans were extremely superstitious in their native land.

But once exposed to religious teachers in America, quickly left their superstitious past behind them, and would frown upon new arrivals of Africans who practiced fetishism in religion.

In Europe, the Roman Catholic Church had lost their grip on people with their questionable religious practices. There were many who thought the Church was wrong and formed a protest or a Protestant Reformation that resulted in the creation of tons of different religions with their doctrines and teachings claiming to be Christian.


Religion definition:
A religion is an organized collection of beliefs, cultural systems,
and world views that relate humanity to an order of existence.



Episcopal, Jesuits, Methodists, Protestant, Anglican, Lutheranism, Calvinism, Presbyterianism, Wesleyanism were all against Roman Catholic teachings.

But there would be a new religion on the horizon for humanity that went by the name of science. The introduction of science was in many ways entirely different than Christianity because it taught man to believe and rely on himself and his creations, rather than on a Supreme Being he couldn't see.

Faith is something foreign and unbelievable to a scientist. Also, this new form of religion would give these believers complete moral authority to do as they wished without a guilty conscience or retribution from a Surpreme Being.

This is what made slavery right or moral in the eyes of so many whites because new science taught that whites were superior and blacks inferior. The theory of evolution is another example in clear teaching that the world exists because of a big bang instead of being created, and also man evolved from apes rather than being created.

Do you believe in Evolution? If so, evolution is your religion because mainstream religion and evolution just don't jive, it's either one or the other.

During slavery, most of the first black congregations and churches were founded by free blacks, but slaves learned about Christianity by attending services led by a white preacher or supervised by a white person. Slaveholders often held prayer meetings at their plantations. Methodist and Baptist were the preferred choices of slaves because of its message.

But after slavery blacks were still restricted in the white churches so what they did next is not a surprise. They began to form their churches free from white rulership and exclusion, but kept the doctrine and teachings, but of course with a more lively twist (singing and dancing). It's clear they still had African culture in their hearts. This would mark the beginning of a new American creation, the black church.


The following is a very brief history of religion in Black America:


Pentacostal -
 Pentacostal Movement
    William Seymour
William J. Seymour - photo#111-yr-2015

Charles Fox Parham an independent holiness evangelist who believed strongly in divine healing, was an important figure in the emergence of Pentecostalism as a distinct Christian movement. But it wasn't until one of his black students named William J. Seymour learned these teaching and took it back to California with him that the Pentecostal movement took off like wildfire.

Seymour's preaching sparked the famous three-year-long Azusa Street Revival in 1906. Worship at the racially integrated Azusa Mission featured an absence of any order of service. (whites would later dislike this) People preached and testified as moved by the Spirit, spoke and sung in tongues, and fell in the Spirit. Blacks whites and other races would attend these services. But there was a matter of Jim Crow to be kept in mind that made it illegal for blacks and whites to mix.

So whites broke away from Seymour and began their Pentecostal churches. It's a fact that the beginning of the widespread Pentecostal movement in the United States is considered to have started with one-eyed black preacher William J. Seymour's Azusa Street Revival.




The Church Of God in Christ (COGIC) -
 The Church Of God in Christ baptism
Church Of God in Christ Baptism
photo#112-yr-2015

The Church Of God in Christ was formed in 1897 by a group of disfellowshiped Baptists, most notably Charles Price Jones (1865–1949) and Charles Harrison Mason (1866–1961) and is a Pentecostal Christian denomination with a predominantly African-American membership. It ranks as the largest Pentecostal denomination and the fifth largest Christian denomination in the U.S. Evangelical Baptist, and Methodist preachers traveled throughout the South in the Great Awakening of the late 18th century and appealed directly to slaves, and a few thousand slaves converted. Early COGIC leaders were very much attracted by the Pentecostal message and would break from the Baptist for this reason.



A.M.E. Church -
The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the A.M.E. Church, is a predominantly African-American Methodist denomination based in the US. It is the oldest independent Protestant denomination founded by blacks in the world. It was founded by the Rt. Rev. Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816 from several black Methodist congregations in the mid-Atlantic area that wanted independence from white Methodists.



Baptists -
Baptists are individuals who comprise a group of denominations and churches that subscribe to a doctrine that baptism should be performed only for professing believers (believer's baptism, as opposed to infant baptism) and that it must be done by complete immersion (as opposed to affusion or sprinkling). Other tenets of Baptist churches include soul competency (liberty), salvation through faith alone, Scripture alone as the rule of faith and practice, and the autonomy of the local congregation. Baptists recognize two ministerial offices, pastors, and deacons. Baptist churches are widely considered to be Protestant churches, though some Baptists disavow this identity.



Islam -
An adherent of Islam is called a Muslim. Jews felt like they were chosen people who were promised a land filled with milk and honey, a holy land. This promise was made to Abraham and his seed. Abraham's wife Sarah had trouble conceiving children so to keep the promise alive and in the family she chose Hagar who was an Egyptian handmaid to have sexual relations with Abraham to bear a son, which is what they did. This son's name was Ishmael.

But something happened later that would throw things into a tizzy. At a very old age Sarah was now able to have kids and bore a son named Isaac.

Now here's the problem. Does the promise belong to Sarah's son or Hagar's son? Sarah felt it belonged to her bloodline, so she sent Hagar and Ishmael into the wilderness for them to die. But guess what? They didn't die. Muhammad who was the final prophet sent by God as identified in the Quran was born within Ishmael's seed line.

So even to this day these two groups don't care for each other.




Science -
This religion by far has proven to be the most destructive for humankind. Its users have created a world of me, me, me, by magnifying themselves, sincerely believing they are all of that and a bag of chips. Also the belief that spirited competition is healthy and useful. Win at all cost! The survival of the fittest theory. Many genocides were accomplished in the name of science. It teaches us that man originates from apes, (many blacks lost their life because of this false teaching) the earth was created from nothing and in essence humans are their gods. The bad far outweighs the good with the practice of science. Just look around.


divider for amazing blacks


African American women selling flowers in 1870
African American women selling flowers outside a building in Washington, D.C.
photo #102

Thomas Peterson
Thomas Mundy Peterson
photo #106-yr-1904

African American junk dealer
The former Freedman's Savings Bank on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.
photo #105-yr-1874

     
Our Community in 1870


Newsworthy Events in the Black Community:


  • Thomas Mundy Peterson of Perth Amboy, New Jersey was the first African-American to vote in an election under the just-enacted provisions of the 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution. His vote was cast on March 31, 1870.

  • United States population in 1870 was 39,818,449, with blacks being 4,880,009 of that total (12.7 percent)

  • The Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution is ratified on March 30, 1870.

  • June 22, 1870 - The United States Congress creates the Department of Justice.

  • June 26, 1870 - Christmas is declared a federal holiday in the United States of America.

  • The Freedman's Savings Bank, was a private corporation chartered by the U.S. government to encourage and guide the economic development of the newly emancipated African-American communities in the post-Civil War period. The bank's central office was located in Washington D.C., but had many branches throughout America, especially in the South. Although functioning only between 1865 and 1874, the company achieved notable successes as a leading financial institution of African-Americans. Its failure in 1874 was devastating to the newly emancipated black community. Trivia: With over 480,000 names on file, it make for the largest single repository of lineage-linked African-American records. The searchable database is available to amateur as well as professional genealogists.



divider for amazing blacks


RESOURCES:


Text_of_Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_Unported_License


#100 -   Public Domain image - Unidentified African American woman, 1 photograph : sixth-plate ambrotype, hand-colored ; 9.3 x 8.0 cm (case) Original Format: Photos, Prints, Drawings Date: 1860

#101 -   Public Domain image - African American men registering to vote. Contributor: Sheppard, William Ludwell Original Format: Photos, Prints, Drawings Date: 1870

#102 -   Public Domain image - Flower-sellers in the market at Washington, D.C. 1 print : wood engraving. | Illustration showing on the top, African American women selling flowers outside a building in Washington, D.C.; Contributor: Sheppard, William Ludwell Original Format: Photos, Prints, Drawings Date: 1870

#103 -   Public Domain image - See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#103a -   Public Domain image - See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#104 -   Public Domain image - Jubilee Singers, Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn. 1 photographic print on carte de visite mount : albumen ; 6 x 10 cm. | Photograph shows members of the Jubilee Singers, nine men and women sitting or standing before the camera. Contributor: American Missionary Association Original Format: Photos, Prints, Drawings Date: 1870

#105 -   Public Domain image - Our goddess of liberty 1 print : wood engraving. | Print shows profile portraits of an Irish(?) woman, an African woman, a Native American woman, and an Asian woman surrounding a traditional image of Miss Liberty. Title continues: What is she to be? To what complexion are we to come at last! Original Format: Photos, Prints, Drawings Date: 1870 the camera. Contributor: American Missionary Association Original Format: Photos, Prints, Drawings Date: 1870

#106 -   Public Domain image - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:15th-amendment-celebration-1870.jpg

#107 -   Public Domain image - Gustave Caillebotte [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#109 -   Public Domain image - Portrait of African American girl, seated, 1 photographic print : tintype, hand-tinted. Original Format: Photos, Prints, Drawings Date: 1870

#110 -   Public Domain image - Levin Corbin Handy [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#111 -   Public Domain image - See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#112 -   Public Domain image - Thomas Nast [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#113 -   Public Domain image - By unattributed [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#114 -   Public Domain image - This image is in the public domain in the United States. In most cases, this means that it was first published prior to January 1, 1923 (see the template documentation for more cases). Other jurisdictions may have other rules, and this image might not be in the public domain outside the United States. See Wikipedia:Public domain and Wikipedia:Copyrights for more details. PD-US Public domain in the United States //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Robert_s_abbott.jpg

#115 -   Public Domain image - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_R_Hawkins.jpg
By Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963, collector. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


About Copyright
If you have any more information about an item you've seen on our website or if you are the copyright owner and believe our website has not properly attributed your work to you or has used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please email admin@amazingblacks.com with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

Terms of Use    Privacy Policy
divider for amazing blacks