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annual hamite award

OUR HAMITE AWARD WINNER FOR 1984:
Bricktop
    Ada Beatrice Queen Victoria Louise Virginia Smith, better known as Bricktop, was an American dancer, singer, vaudevillian, and self-described saloon-keeper who owned the nightclub Chez Bricktop in Paris from 1924 to 1961, as well as clubs in Mexico City and Rome. She has been called "...one of the most legendary and enduring figures of twentieth-century American cultural history."

    Smith was born in Alderson, West Virginia, the youngest of four children by an Irish father and a black mother. When her father died, her family relocated to Chicago. It was there that saloon life caught her fancy, and where she acquired her nickname, "Bricktop," for the flaming red hair and freckles inherited from her father.

    She began performing when she was very young, and by 16, she was touring with TOBA (Theatre Owners' Booking Association) and on the Pantages vaudeville circuit. Aged 20, her performance tours brought her to New York City. While at Barron's Exclusive Club, a nightspot in Harlem, she put in a good word for a band called Elmer Snowden's Washingtonians, and the club booked them. One of its members was Duke Ellington.

    Her first meeting with Cole Porter is related in her obituary in the Huntington (West Virginia) Herald-Dispatch:

    Porter once walked into the cabaret and ordered a bottle of wine. "Little girl, can you do the Charleston?" he asked. Yes, she said. And when she demonstrated the new dance, he exclaimed, "What legs! What legs!"

    John Steinbeck was once thrown out of her club for "ungentlemanly behavior." He regained her affection by sending a taxi full of roses.

    By 1924, she was in Paris. Cole Porter hosted many parties, "lovely parties" as Bricktop called them, where he hired her as an entertainer, often to teach his guests the latest dance craze such as the Charleston and the Black Bottom. In Paris, Bricktop began operating the clubs where she performed, including The Music Box and Le Grand Duc. She called her next club "Chez Bricktop," and in 1929 she relocated it to 66 rue Pigalle. Her headliner was a young Mabel Mercer, who was to become a legend in cabaret.

    Known for her signature cigars, the "doyenne of cafe society" drew many well-known figures to her club, including Cole Porter, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald mentions the club in his 1931 short story Babylon Revisited. Her protégés included Duke Ellington, Mabel Mercer, and Josephine Baker. She worked with Langston Hughes when he was still a busboy. The Cole Porter song, "Miss Otis Regrets," was written especially for her to perform. Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli wrote a song called "Brick Top."

    She married singer Peter DuConge in 1929. Though they separated after a few years, they never divorced, Bricktop later saying that "as a Catholic, I do not recognize divorce." According to Jean-Claude Baker, one of Josephine Baker's children, as recorded in his book about his mother's life, titled Josephine: The Hungry Heart, Baker and Bricktop were involved in a lesbian affair for a time, early in their careers.

    Bricktop broadcast a radio program in Paris from 1938–39, for the French government. During WWII, she closed "Chez Bricktop" and moved to Mexico City where she opened a new nightclub in 1944. In 1949, she returned to Europe and started a club in Rome. Bricktop closed her club and retired in 1961 at the age of 67, saying "I'm tired, honey. Tired of staying up all night." Afterwards, she moved back to the United States.

    Bricktop continued to perform as a cabaret entertainer well into her eighties, including some engagements at the age of 84 in London, where she proved herself to be as professional and feisty as she had ever been and included Cole Porter's "Love for Sale" in her repertoire.

    She wrote her autobiography, Bricktop by Bricktop, with the help of James Haskins, the prolific author who wrote biographies of Thurgood Marshall and Rosa Parks. It was published in 1983 by Welcome Rain Publishers (ISBN 0-689-11349-8).

    This website bestows upon this great American entertainer the 1984 Hamite Award for showing other blacks they could live outside the box and soar like the eagles and her remarkable ability in making people of all races happy.

    Bricktop died in her sleep in her apartment in Manhattan in 1984, aged 89. She remained active into her old age and according to James Haskins, had talked to friends on the phone hours before her death.

Bricktop
Bricktop
photo #101-yr-1894





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How were blacks feeling in 1984?
happy mood of blacks


crack cocaine use

welcome to the 80s



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Tommie Smith  and John Carlos black power salute
Tommie Smith and John Carlos
Three Proud People mural in Newtown photo #109

DID YOU KNOW?
    Ever wonder how the term "African American" came into existence? After the civil rights movement, blacks felt the need for a more accurate term to describe the race than colored or Negro, which was associated with much pain and suffering. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, blacks no longer approved of the term Negro. In its experimental stages, the term Afro-American was used for a while but didn't last. Later the Black Power movement made us feel proud using black as the term in describing our race.

    The song, "Say It Loud – I'm Black, and I'm Proud" by James Brown became an unofficial anthem of the Black Power movement. But it wasn't until the 1980s the term African American was advanced on the model of, for example, German-American or Irish-American to give descendants of American slaves and other American blacks who lived through the slavery era a heritage and a cultural base. The term was popularized in black communities around the country via word of mouth and ultimately received mainstream use after Jesse Jackson publicly used the term in front of a national audience. Subsequently, major media outlets adopted its use.

Proud to be African American


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blacks and boxing

Carl Lewis
Carl Lewis
photo #104-yr-1983

Eric Dickerson
Eric Dickerson
photo #103-yr-1984

Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
photo #102-yr-1999

Larry Holmes
Larry Holmes
photo #122-yr-1978

      Sports in 1984
  • August 1984 - Carl Lewis wins big with four Gold Medals at the Olympics in Los Angeles, California.

  • March 9, 1984 - Boxer Tim Witherspoondefeats a tough Greg Page in 12 rounds for the heavyweight boxing title.

  • April 5, 1984 - Basketball's Kareem Abdul-Jabbar breaks "Wilt the stilt" Chamberlain's all-time career scoring record.

  • June 16, 1984 - Track and Field's Edwin Moses was victorious in his 100th consecutive 400-meter hurdles race.

  • June 24, 1984 - Baseball great Joe Morgan sets career homerun mark for playing at second base.

  • July 26, 1984 - Baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn announces Vida Blue is suspended because of cocaine conviction.

  • September 12, 1984 - Baseball's New York Mets Dwight Gooden sets a rookie strike out record at an amazing 251 batters he faced.

  • August 31, 1984 - Boxer Pinklon Thomas defeatss Tim Witherspoon in 12 rounds for the heavyweight boxing title.

  • September 18, 1984 - Baseball's Tim Raines is the first playerto achieve 4 consecutive 70-stolen-base seasons.

  • October 7, 1984 - Football's Walter Payton passes Jim Brown as NFL's career rushing leader.

  • November 9, 1984 - Boxer Larry Holmes knocks out James Bonecrusher Smith in 12 rounds for the heavyweight boxing title.

  • November 20, 1984 - Mets pitcher Dwight Gooden wins National League Rookie of Year.

  • December 9, 1984 - Football's Los Angeles Ram Eric Dickerson rushes 215 yards for season record 2,003 yards.

  • 1984 - Basketball's Michael Jordan is the NBA Rookie of the Year.



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WAR ON BLACKS, OR ALSO KNOWN AS WAR ON DRUGS

Mass Incarceration


law and order
Convicts Leased to Harvest Timber, around 1915, Florida
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Convicts_Leased_to_Harvest_Timber.png
(public domain image)


    The more things change, the more they stay the same


Shortly after slavery, blacks were thrown into prison for petty and minor offenses which resulted in long sentences. It was big business for the penitentiary because they would hire these convicts out for various jobs and keep blacks off the streets at the same time. They killed two birds with one stone.


It was a form of bondage that did not last a lifetime and did not automatically extend from one generation to the next. But it was nonetheless slavery – a system in which armies of free men, guilty of no crimes and entitled by law to freedom, were compelled to labor without compensation, were repeatedly bought and sold, and were forced to do the bidding of white masters through the regular application of extraordinary physical coercion.


This form of slavery was abolished by President Franklin D. Roosevelt December 12, 1941.


Is the criminal justise system much different today?


President Richard Nixon started the modern day Law and Order campaign of the War on Drugs. President Ronald Reagan would continue with the program in his administration and later President Bill Clinton during his term created tough mandatory sentencing that unfairly affected blacks.

Crack cocaine was associated with poor blacks because it was a cheap drug and in contrast with powder cocaine which was considered a white man's drug because it was more expensive. Neither drug was more deadly than the other but crack was demonized because it was associated with black people.

While a person found with five grams of crack cocaine faced a five-year mandatory minimum prison sentence, a person holding powder cocaine could receive the same sentence only if he or she held five hundred grams. Similarly, those carrying ten grams of crack cocaine faced a ten-year mandatory sentence, while possession of one thousand grams of powder cocaine was required for the same sentence to be imposed.

Don't get it wrong, these were very well ORGANIZED methods from anti-Americans in control of our country to hold blacks down and is very well documented. It seems these anti-Americans are always reinventing themselves in ways of oppressing black citizens. Perhaps they should show some love for a change instead of acting on their imagined fear.


Check these statistics out

One of every three black American males born today can expect to go to prison in his lifetime. While black defendants account for roughly 80% of those arrested for crack-related offenses, public health data has found that two-thirds of crack cocaine users are white or Hispanic. The leading cause of incarceration of an African American male is a non-violent drug offense. Most black men in prisons are not monsters but just got caught up in the system for a non-violent mistake they may have made.

These stats are for the years 1970 - 2010



1 in every 106 White males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order



1 in every 36 Hispanic males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order



1 in every 15 Black males age 18 or older is incarcerated
law and order


    We have to help our own black boys because nobody else cares. Wouldn't it be nice if today's blacks possessed the same gumption our African American ancestors had by taking control of our own destiny as a race of people? It seems ever since the end of slavery we are constantly pointing out to the white man how unfair and unjust he has treated us. Don't you think he knows that? What do we expect them to do, start crying and say I'm sorry and start treating us like fellow Americans by sharing freely? Don't hold your breath.


    At this point in history, it's clear we must begin to work on ourselves more than anything else. We've probably gone just about as far as we can go with the protesting/marching strategy which was an excellent choice over the decades, but now it's time for action on our part. MLK would have likely said the same thing.


    A very unpopular message for many blacks who live with the self-pity attitude but the only avenue available for American success. Can you imagine how much it would lift our race if every single black boy possessed a college degree? It's a dream that could become a reality if we really believed it.


    Education plays the major role in American success for blacks and any group of blacks in a position of authority such as sports figures, entertainers, singers, etc that teaches the opposite by their examples we should run away from them as fast as possible. Sadly, these groups are the ones that many blacks look up to for guidance instead of our black educators.


    When one of us climbs the very difficult and racist ladder of success in the American power structure by using our God-given brain power we will not forget about those we left behind, but instead will help other blacks do the same by extending a hand until we find ourselves in a position of directing instead of always asking and begging.


    Our ancestors knew we could do it and we have to believe it too. We are from some of the strongest and finest stock that is known to mankind and should set the example for all dark skinned people over the entire earth simply because we are in a position to do so and live in the greatest country in the world. Our story is one of the greatest ever told. We are AmazingBlacks.



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watermelon slaves food
DID YOU KNOW?
    Ever wonder how the soul-food revolution began? It became a popular term in the 1960's. Slave ships with their cargo of slaves traveled from West Africa to North America with foods that were native to African soil. It was the ship's captain best interest to keep slaves alive and healthy by feeding them these foods for their long transatlantic voyage. Some of these foods native to Africa are black-eyed peas, rice, yams, peanuts and don't forget the infamous watermelon. Once here in America, slaves were allowed to grow these foods and along with the scraps the master would give them during 'ration times' (sometimes meat) is what laid the foundation for soul-food.


watermelon slaves food


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HOW LONG WILL GOOD WHITE-AMERICANS
SIT ON THE FENCE?




whites sitting on fence


Since the beginning of American history, there's always been a fight between good and bad. The problem is that both good and bad forces claim to adore democracy. Someone is lying. You be the judge.


First, we need to define democracy and we'll let two of America's greatest Presidents do this for us by their actions and famous quotes.


Abraham Lincoln made the following quotes:

"As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this to the extent of the difference, is no democracy."

"I have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and the black races.... But I hold that ... there is no reason in the world why the negro is not entitled to all the natural rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence, the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."


Now it's very clear from the many biased comments Abraham Lincoln made against black people he wasn't the type that would have blacks over for dinner, in fact, most whites shared his views many years ago. But that's okay, at least he was honest. This site believes he would have changed his racist views if living in our time because one of his most admirable qualities was flexibility.


In contrast to Abraham Lincoln, the first President of the United States, George Washington didn't share Lincoln's view of democracy.


Black slaves were actively sought and recruited to fight for America in the Revolutionary War and promised citizenship after the victory. It's well recorded that slaves fought with courage and valor that ensured American success. George Washington himself made the comment:

Washington wrote a letter to Colonel Henry Lee III stating that success in the war would come to whatever side could arm the blacks the fastest.


whites sitting on fence

But after victory in the war, America didn't keep it promises, and most blacks were forced back into slavery. Of course, George Washington had to know about this but did nothing. Washington was a brilliant soldier but failed as an upholder of truth and justice and set the tone for future race relations in our country by trivializing and compromising real Democracy.


Washington had many slaves himself and didn't want to free them and damage his financial stake. He put money interests ahead of real Democracy. But all of America's founders didn't feel this way. A contemporary of Washington and future President John Adams hated slavery and was proud to boast he handled his business with paid workers. Did George Washington look at himself in the mirror and feel guilty about compromising (true) American Democracy? History says he didn't.


Washington created the blueprint for this distorted view of true Democracy


Blacks in the colonies had been treated poorly since their arrival from Africa, but this action by Washington made it official. This blueprint became the norm in much of America's dealings with black people. Whites felt if their supreme leader thought so lowly of black people, they would also.


We must all be honest with ourselves in admitting this view of Democracy was not American because it denied certain humans liberty, justice and the pursuit of happiness. Therefore we must call for what it was, which is Anti-American.


So we had two different Presidents with various versions of Democracy, and this is the way it remains today. What made Lincoln a force for good and better President was he put Democracy first and his personal prejudices second, but Washington put his financial interest ahead of true Democracy. This is what set these two men apart. Both were great men with different views about what it meant to be an American on the side of liberty and justice for all.


After Lincoln's death, democracy would take a downward spiral. One of the most biased President in American history led the attack. His name was Andrew Johnson, and he fought against the Civil Rights of blacks tooth and nail. Every favorable bill for former slaves that appeared on his desk was immediately denied. Later, there were new laws created to restrict black American citizens that worked very well. This was called the Jim Crow era. It was an all-out attack on Democracy by Anti-Americans and aided by good white Americans who remained on the fence. Read for yourself.


There's not enough room on this web page to describe the hate and exclusion by government and white Americans against blacks during this period. Jim Crow laws touched every part of life, all across America. Blacks and whites were kept apart as much as possible. Good jobs went to whites; blacks were given the worst with less pay. Many industries wouldn’t hire blacks. Many unions passed special rules to exclude them. All juries and judges were white; blacks were illegally denied voting rights. No blacks allowed in public pools. Many restaurants would not serve blacks, and those that did had a dirty colored section. Blacks and whites went to county fairs on different days. Blacks couldn't use public libraries. Simple common courtesy was rarely shown the blacks. Whites beat, tortured, raped and killed blacks with no fear of punishment. Blacks were denied credit for businesses, housing, cars by the banks. Blacks were kept out of white neighborhoods with housing covenants. Oklahoma had black and white phone booths. Texas had cities where blacks were entirely restricted from living. Blacks could not leave their homes after 10:00 pm in Mobile Alabama. Blacks could not marry whites. Georgia had separate white and black parks. Prisons, hospitals, and orphanages were segregated as were schools and colleges. Blacks and whites had to use separate sets of books in school, in Florida, they couldn't be stored together. When a person was sworn in at a trial, the whites used one Bible, and the blacks had a separate Bible. For those who did complete college, a crucial question had to be answered. Who was going to be their clients? Whites didn't engage blacks in business, and the battered Negro couldn't afford their services. These laws became so entrenched in American life; even unwritten laws affected black citizenship; blacks understood to stay out of white stores and establishments. Segregation was so complete that whites did not see blacks except when being served by them. After the Civil Rights movement of the 60s, blacks have made enormous gains. This is how the United States of America became a polarized country. Each and every President knew what was going on and allowed this illegal activity for 87 years. Were they guilty of not upholding the United States Constitution in the Negroes behalf? Is this the reason why many other nations laugh at America with its constant claims of being on the side of good and high morality?



Did religion made things worse?


Even though the U.S. was not founded as a Christian nation and existed solely as a secular state completely free of religious influence in lawmaking, religion would soon be thrown into the loop. This made American people feel righteous and just in their own eyes. White's beleived they were "good" and made in God's image and blacks were not. In time slogans such as "In God We Trust" were printed on money to describe a people who had snuffed out Democracy, They felt God was on their side and loved only them.


Countless movies, radio shows, newspapers, magazines and other media would consistently portray these Anti-Americans as on the side of good, morally upstanding and righteous to the world with God on their side. Good white Americans had to know this was a farce because of the way it's black citizens were being treated and did nothing.


There were a relative few brave, good white Americans who spoke up during this period and got involved with some even losing their lives, but the majority did nothing. They remained on the fence because they were also partakers of the privileged American way of living and failed to realize how this was undermining true Democracy with the threat of one day being faced with an America they wouldn't recognize.


whites sitting on fence


“Ignorance of how we are shaped racially is the first sign of privilege. In other words. It is a privilege to ignore the consequences of race in America.” Tim Wise


So, what now?


Because of the folly of racism and privilege by Anti-Americans and the lack of action to speak out for true Democracy by good Americans, has our country morphed into another form of power? Something that is completely different than it started out as, perhaps like an insatiable, detestable and ugly monster, without a soul or conscience? You be the judge.


whites sitting on fence





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ballot box

President Ronald Reagan
President Ronald Reagan
photo #104-yr-1981

Jesse Jackson
Jesse Jackson
photo #104-yr-1984

     Political Scene in 1984
  • 1984 - Ronald Reagan was an American politician, commentator, and actor, who served as the 40th President of the United States from 1981 to 1989. Prior to his presidency, he served as the 33rd Governor of California from 1967 to 1975, following a career as an actor and union leader in Hollywood.

  • 1984 - W. Wilson Goode served from 1984 to 1992 as the first African American mayor of Philadelphia.

  • 1984 - Jesse Jackson wins a quarter of votes in Democratic primaries and caucuses, but lost out on the Democratic presidential nomination.



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Childish racism


black Movies in America

Isabel Sanford
Isabel Sanford with The Jeffersons co-stars, Sherman Hemsley and Mike Evans
photo #105-yr-1917

     Television / Movies in 1984
    Television:
  • Sep 20, 1984 - The Cosby Show - makes its television debut in 1984.



  • The Jeffersons - is an black sitcom that was broadcast on CBS from January 18, 1975, through July 2, 1985. The show focuses on George and (weezy) Louise Jefferson, an affluent African-American couple living in New York City. Proud George loved his family, little man carried a big stick and wasn't afraid of anybody. Movin on Up!



  • Movies:
    Dec 1, 1984 - "Beverly Hills Cop" directed by Martin Brest and starring Eddie Murphy premieres in Los Angeles, California.


    Academy Award Winners:
  • 1984 - Prince for Purple Rain. Best Original Music Score

  • 1984 - Stevie Wonder for The Woman in Red. Best Original Song





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black professional women


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famous african american birthdays


Angela Haynes
Angela Haynes
photo #102- in year 1984

     Famous Birthdays in 1984
  • January 2, 1984 - Brandon Makkole DeShazer an American actor and former model.

  • January 27, 1984 - Davetta Sherwood an American actress and musician.

  • January 30, 1984 - Kid Cudi  an American recording artist and actor from Cleveland.

  • February 1, 1984 - Lee Thompson Young  was an American actor.

  • February 6, 1984 - Brandon Hammond an American former child actor.

  • February 28, 1984 - Milan Christopher an African American recording artist, actor, fashion, underwear model, VJ and entrepreneur, owning several teeth whitening facilities across the U.S.

  • March 7, 1984 - Brandon Timothy Jackson an American stand-up comedian, rapper, actor, and writer.

  • March 11, 1984 - Rob Brown   actor. He is known for his roles in the films Finding Forrester (2000)

  • April 1, 1984 - Tavares Jamal Cherry an American actor and fashion model from Chicago, IL.

  • May 9, 1984 - Prince Semien Fielder an American professional baseball player for the Texas Rangers of Major League Baseball (MLB).

  • May 20, 1984 - Naturi Cora Maria Naughton  an American singer-songwriter, rapper, and actress.

  • June 2, 1984 - Kevin Duhaney Canadian voice artist and actor.

  • June 21, 1984 - Jessica White   an American model and occasional actress.

  • June 25, 1984 - Alyssa Ashley Nichols an American actress.

  • June 26, 1984 - Elijah David Dukes, Jr.  an American former professional baseball player.

  • June 30, 1984 - Fantasia an American R&B singer and actress.

  • July 2, 1984 - Vanessa Lee Chester  an American television and film actress.

  • July 6, 1984 - Shenay Perry an American professional tennis player.

  • July 14, 1984 - Joshua Elijah Reese an American actor.

  • September 2, 1984- Joshua Anthony Charlton Henry an American actor and singer of stage and screen.

  • September 27, 1984 - Angela Haynes  a former professional tennis player from the United States.

  • October 5, 1984 - Brooke Valentine an American singer, actress, and model.

  • October 30, 1984 - Eva Marcille Pigford  an American actress, TV host and fashion model.

  • November 6, 1984 - Patina Renea Miller  an American actress and singer.

  • November 12, 1984 - Omarion an American R&B singer, songwriter, dancer and actor.

  • November 28, 1984 - Trey Songz an American singer-songwriter, record producer, actor, and rapper.

  • December 1, 1984 - Michael Davis an American actor and model.

  • December 5, 1984 - Lauren Nicole London  an American film actress, Hip hop model, television personality and occasional television actress.

  • December 11, 1984 - Xosha Kai Roquemore an American actress.

  • December 16, 1984 - Derek Johnson, Jr.  an American Christian hip hop artist, record producer, entrepreneur, actor, and screenwriter.

  • December 19, 1984 - Hisonni Johnson  an American film and television actor.

  • December 30, 1984 - LeBron James   professional basketball player with the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA).

  • 1984 - DeVaughn Nixon  an American actor.

  • 1984 - Quinton Aaron   actor whose first lead role was as Michael Oher in the 2009 film The Blind Side.



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black american deaths

Bricktop
Bricktop
photo #101-yr-1894

Marvin Gaye
Marvin Gaye
photo #108-yr-1968

Jackie Wilson
Jackie Wilson
photo #106-yr-1934

Alice Burton Russell
Alice Burton Russell
photo #109-yr-1892

     Famous Deaths in 1984
  • January 21, 1984 - Jackie Wilson  singer and performer. Known as "Mr. Excitement", Wilson was important in the transition of rhythm and blues into soul.

  • February 1, 1984 - Bricktop was an American dancer, singer, vaudevillian, and self-described saloon-keeper who owned the nightclub Chez Bricktop in Paris from 1924 to 1961, as well as clubs in Mexico City and Rome. She has been called "...one of the most legendary and enduring figures of twentieth-century American cultural history."

  • February 15, 1984 - Avon Long  was an American Broadway actor and singer.

  • February 19, 1984 - Ina Ray Hutton was an American female bandleader, vocalist and performer during the Big band era, and sister to June Hutton.

  • March 28, 1984 - Benjamin Mays   black minister, educator, sociologist, social activist and the president of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia.

  • April 1, 1984 - Marvin Gaye  was an African American singer-songwriter and musician.

  • April 26, 1984 - Count Basie   jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer.

  • May 28, 1984 - D'Urville Martin was an American actor and director in both film and television.

  • July 25, 1984 - Big Mama Thorntons  African American rhythm and blues singer and songwriter. She was the first to record "Hound Dog" in 1952, which became her biggest hit.

  • August 16, 1984 - Tommie Lee Aaron  was a first baseman and left fielder in Major League Baseball, and a younger brother of Hall of Famer Hank Aaron.

  • October 17, 1984 – Alberta Hunter was an American blues singer, songwriter, and nurse. Her career had started back in the early 1920s, and from there on, she became a successful jazz and blues recording artist, being critically acclaimed to the ranks of Ethel Waters and Bessie Smith.

  • October 22, 1984 - Napoleon Whiting  was an American character actor. He played many bit parts, often uncredited, as a menial worker such as the black butler, a stereotypical role.

  • November 12, 1984 - Chester Bomar Himes  was an African American writer.

  • December 1984 - Alice Burton Russell  was an African-American actress and the wife of director Oscar Micheaux, who appeared in six films directed by her husband.

  last words
  Marvin Gaye
  Jackie Wilson


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famous african american weddings

James Brown
James Brown
photo #103-yr-1933

     Famous Weddings in 1984
  • April 24, 1984 - Damon Wayans  and Lisa Thorner were married.

  • April 27, 1984 - Debbie Allen and Norman Nixon were married.

  • May 26, 1984 - Nia Peeples and Guy Ecker were married.

  • June 16, 1984 - Morgan Freeman and Myrna Colley-Lee were married.

  • September 7, 1984 - Janet Jackson and James DeBarge were married.

  • October 3, 1984 - Ruth Pointer  and Donald Boyette were married.

  • 1984 - Al Roker  and Alice Bell were married.

  • 1984 - Kofi Annan and Nane Lagergren were married.

  • 1984 - James Brown  and Adrienne Rodriguez were married.



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famous african american divorces

Debbi  Morgan
Actress Debbi Morgan with Dorian Harewood in The Jesse Owens Story, 1984
photo #102-yr-1956

     Famous Divorces in 1984
  • July 18, 1984 - David Ruffin and Sandra Ruffin were divorced.

  • 1984 - Glynn Turman and Aretha Franklin were divorced.

  • 1984 - Denise Nicholas  and Jim Hill were divorced.

  • 1984 - Ed Bradley and Priscilla Coolidge were divorced.

  • 1984 - Jackie Jackson  and Enid Arden Jackson were divorced.

  • 1984 - Flip Wilson  and Tuanchai MacKenzie were divorced.

  • 1984 - Akasha Gloria Hull  and Prentice Roy Hull were divorced.

  • 1984 - Debbi Morgan and Charles Weldon were divorced.



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black leaders ashamed of our progress


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soul train
Soul Train ran from 1971-2006
photo #109-yr-1971

Aretha Franklin
Aretha Franklin
photo #100-yr-1971

Patti LaBelle
Patti LaBelle
photo #100-yr-1944

Rufus and Chaka
Rufus and Chaka
photo #115-yr-1979

Fats Waller
Fats Waller
photo #106-yr-1984

 Stevie Wonder
Stevie Wonder
photo #109-yr-1967

  Gladys Knight and the Pips
Gladys Knight and the Pips
photo #108-yr-1967

     Music in 1984

  Billboard Top Soul Hits:
  • "Time Will Reveal" DeBarge

  • "Joanna" Kool & the Gang

  • "If Only You Knew" Patti LaBelle

  • "Encore" Cheryl Lynn

  • "Somebody's Watching Me" Rockwell

  • "She's Strange" Cameo

  • "Hello" Lionel Richie

  • "Don't Waste Your Time" Yarbrough & Peoples

  • "Let's Hear It for the Boy" Deniece Williams

  • "Lovelite" O'Bryan

  • "When Doves Cry" Prince

  • "Ghostbusters" Ray Parker, Jr.

  • "Caribbean Queen (No More Love on the Run)" Billy Ocean

  • "Let's Go Crazy" Prince and the Revolution

  • "I Just Called to Say I Love You" Stevie Wonder

  • "I Feel For You" Chaka Khan

  • "Cool It Now" New Edition

  • "Solid" Ashford & Simpson

  • "Operator" Midnight Star



  Popular Soul Dances:
  • Break-dancing

  • The Macarena

  • The Robot

  • The Electric Slide

  • The MC Hammer

  • The Worm

  • Hip Hop

  • Moonwalk

  • Voguing

  • Crip Walk

  • Cabbage patch

  • Running Man

  • Chicago stepping

  • KC Two-Step

  • Detroit Ballroom




  Musical Happenings in 1984:
  • Run-D.M.C.'s Run-D.M.C. is the first hip hop album to go gold.

  • Hip hop mogul Russell Simmons forms Def Jam Records in Harlem.



 Blues Hall of Fame for 1984:
    The Blues Hall of Fame is a music museum located in Memphis, Tennessee. Until recently, the "Blues Hall of Fame" was not a physical building, but a listing of people who have significantly contributed to blues music. Started in 1980 by the Blues Foundation, it honors those who have performed, recorded, or documented blues. The actual building for the hall opened to the public on May 8, 2015

  • Otis Rush
  • Hound Dog Taylor
  • Big Mama Thornton


 American Music Awards winners in 1984:
    The American Music Awards was created by Dick Clark to compete with the Grammy Awards. Michael Jackson and Donny Osmond co-hosted the first award show with Rodney Allen Rippy and Ricky Segall in 1974. Unlike the Grammys, which are awarded on the basis of votes by members of the Recording Academy, the AMAs are determined by a poll of the public and fans, who can vote through the AMAs website.

    Favorite Pop/Rock Video
  • "Beat It" – Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Pop/Rock Single
  • "Billie Jean" – Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Pop/Rock Album
  • Thriller – Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Pop/Rock Male Artist
  • Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Male Artist
  • Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Female Artist
  • Aretha Franklin

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Band, Duo, or Group
  • Gladys Knight & The Pips

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Album
  • Thriller – Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Single
  • "Billie Jean" – Michael Jackson

  • Favorite Soul/R&B Video
  • "Beat It" – Michael Jackson

  • Award of Merit
  • Michael Jackson


 Grammy winners in 1984:

    The 26th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 28, 1984 at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, and were broadcast live on American television. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1983. Michael Jackson won a record eight awards during the show.

    Record of the Year
  • "Beat It"-Michael Jackson , Quincy Jones (producer) & Michael Jackson (producer)


  • Album of the Year
  • "Thriller"-Michael Jackson, Quincy Jones (producer) & Michael Jackson (producer)


  • Best Traditional Blues Recording
  • Blues 'n Jazz-B.B. King


  • Best Recording for Children
  • Quincy Jones (producer) & Michael Jackson for E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial


  • Best Classical Vocal Soloist Performance
  • James Levine (conductor), Marilyn Horne, Leontyne Price & the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for Leontyne Price & Marilyn Horne in Concert at the Met


  • Best Comedy Recording
  • "Eddie Murphy: Comedian"-Eddie Murphy


  • Best Vocal Arrangement for Two or More Voices
  • Arif Mardin & Chaka Khan (arrangers) for "Be Bop Medley" performed by Chaka Khan


  • Best Album of Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or A Television Special
  • Michael Boddicker, Irene Cara, Kim Carnes, Douglas Cotler, Keith Forsey, Richard Gilbert, Jerry Hey, Duane Hitchings, Craig Krampf, Ronald Magness, Dennis Matkosky, Giorgio Moroder, Phil Ramone, Michael Sembello, Shandi Sinnamon (composers) for Flashdance performed by various artists


  • Best Ethnic or Traditional Folk Recording
  • Clifton Chenier for I'm Here performed by Clifton Chenier & His Red Hot Louisiana Band


  • Best Gospel Performance by a Duo or Group
  • Larnelle Harris & Sandi Patti for "More Than Wonderful"


  • Best Soul Gospel Performance, Female
  • Sandra Crouch for We Sing Praises


  • Best Soul Gospel Performance, Male
  • Al Green for I'll Rise Again


  • Best Inspirational Performance
  • Donna Summer for "He's a Rebel"


  • Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female
  • Ella Fitzgerald for The Best Is Yet to Come


  • Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Soloist
  • Wynton Marsalis for Think of One


  • Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female
  • "Flashdance... What a Feeling"-Irene Cara


  • Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male
  • "Thriller"-Michael Jackson


  • Best Pop Instrumental Performance
  • "Being With You"-George Benson


  • Best Engineered Recording, Non-Classical
  • Thriller, Bruce Swedien (engineer) (Michael Jackson)


  • Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
  • "Chaka Khan"-Chaka Khan


  • Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
  • "Billie Jean"-Michael Jackson


  • Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal
  • "Ain't Nobody"-Chaka Khan & Rufus


  • Best R&B Instrumental Performance
  • "Rockit"-Herbie Hancock


  • Best Rhythm & Blues Song
  • "Billie Jean"-Michael Jackson - Michael Jackson (songwriter)


  • Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male
  • "Beat It"-Michael Jackson


  • Grammy Hall of Fame Award
  • Fats Waller




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famous black/african american singers
Slaves kidnapped from their homes years ago bascially belonged to tribes. Each tribe was as different as night and day to the next tribe.
famous black singers


They each had their individual languages and customs. So upon arriving in America they had to create a way to communicate with their master and each other, so over time they developed a spanking new and unique language called African American Vernacular English, and it didn't stop there.

Each group had their defined drum beat from their tribe that was added to the new way of life in the New World but with a new American twist with musical instruments they didn't have in Africa.

So to put it simply, soul or black music is a mixture of many different African beats incorporated into a new American culture. Think about how exciting that is, if it's possible to create anything positive at all from slavery it has to be African American music. It's admired all over the world.

We all originate from the same place, so it doesn't matter if we're listening to early 1900s blues singer "Ma Rainey" or the great 1940s singers "Billie Holiday" and "Nat King Cole" down to the famous rappers of our time such as the two late greats, "Biggie Smalls" or "Tupac", it all sounds good to us because we can feel and hear that beat.

Many cultures have contributed to the American way of life such as German Americans who introduced the Christmas tree tradition, or Italian Americans with their delicious pizza, or Mexican Americans with the tacos and delicious burritos, or the English Americans with their mainstays such as baseball and apple pie. The list goes on and on, and to add to those contributions, and without a doubt, soul music has changed the American way of life, it is truly an original, and one of our many proud contributions to our home here in America.
famous african american singers


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Womens fashions in the 1980s
Womens fashions in the 1980s
photo #105-yr-1980

mens fashions in the 1980s
Mens fashions in the 1980s
photo #106-yr-1980

Womens fashions in the 1980s
The rah-rah skirt is a short flounced layered skirt that originated in cheerleading and became a popular fashion trend among teenage girls in the early 1980s. Later in the 1980s it was often worn with leather, denim or lace.
photo #107-yr-1980

hairstyles in the 1980s
Jheri curl hairstyle worn in the 1980s.
photo #108-yr-1980

     Fashions and Styles in 1984

  Popular Fashions:

    Women:
    The early 1980s were very different from the rest of the decade, with some carryovers from the late 1970s. Clothing colors were subdued, quiet and basic; varying shades of brown, tan, and orange were common. Fashionable clothing in the early 1980s included both unisex and gender-specific attire. Widespread fashions for women in the early 1980s included sweaters (including turtleneck, crew neck, and v-neck varieties); fur-lined puffer jackets; tunics; faux-fur coats; velvet blazers; trench coats (made in both fake and real leather); crop tops; tube tops; knee-length skirts (of no prescribed length, as designers opted for choice); loose, flowy, knee-length dresses (with high-cut and low-cut necklines, varying sleeve lengths, and made in a variety of fabrics including cotton, silk, satin, and polyester); high-waisted loose pants; embroidered jeans; leather pants; and designer jeans. Women's pants of the 1980s were, in general, worn with long inseams - a style carried over from the 1970s. Accessories for women included thin belts, knee-high boots with thick kitten heels, sneakers, jelly shoes (a new trend at the time), mules, round-toed shoes and boots, jelly bracelets (inspired by Madonna in 1983), shoes with thick heels, small, thin necklaces (with a variety of materials, such as gold and pearls), and small watches. The fitness craze of the 1970s continued into the early 1980s. General women's street-wear worn in the early 1980s included ripped sweatshirts, leotards, tights, sweatpants, and tracksuits (especially ones made in velour). Prior to the mid-1980s, it had been taboo to show a slip or a bra strap in public. A visible undergarment had been a sign of social ineptness. With the new fashion's most extreme forms, young women would forgo conventional outer-garments for vintage-style bustiers with lacy slips and several large crucifixes.


    Men:
    In the early 1980s, fashion had carried onward from the late 1970s. Athletic clothes were more popular than jeans during this period, as were more subdued colors. Looser pants remained popular during this time, being fairly wide but straight, and tighter shirts were especially popular. The general public, at this time, wanted to wear low-maintenance clothing with more basic colors, as the global recession going on at the time kept extravagant clothes out of reach. Popular clothing in the early 1980s worn by men includes tracksuits, v-neck sweaters, polyester and velour polo-neck shirts, sports jerseys, straight-leg jeans, polyester button-ups, cowboy boots, beanies, and hoodies. In the mid 1980s, popular trends included wool sport coats, Levi 501s, Hawaiian shirts, shell suits, hand-knit sweaters, sports shirts, hoodies, flannel shirts, reversible flannel vests, jackets with the insides quilted, nylon jackets, gold rings, spandex cycling shorts, cowboy boots, and khaki pants with jagged seams. T-shirts underneath expensive suit jackets with broad, padded shoulders, hawaiian shirts (complemented with sport coats, often with top-stitched lapels for a "custom-tailored" look), and (in counterpoint to the bright shirt) jackets that were often gray, tan, rust or white. Easy-care micro-suede and corduroy jackets became popular choices, especially those with a Western style.


    Rap and hip-hop:
    Athletic shoes had been worn as casual wear before, but for the first time they became a high-priced fashion item. Converse shoes were popular in the first half of the 1980s. Air Jordan basketball shoes (named for basketball player Michael Jordan) made their debut in 1984. The NBA banned these shoes from games when they debuted, which increased their cachet. Soon, other manufacturers introduced premium athletic shoes. Adidas sneakers took the decade by storm, becoming popular among teenage boys and young men; the Adidas sneaker was popularized by the Run-D.M.C. song My Adidas. Nike had a similar share of the market, with Air Max and similar shoes. High-tops, especially of white or black leather, became popular. In the early 1980s, long and white athletic socks, often calf-high or knee-high, were worn with sneakers. As the decade progressed, socks trended shorter, eventually topping out just above the height of the shoe. Ensembles featuring the colors of Africa (green, yellow and red) became wildly popular among African Americans, as did kente cloth. In the urban hip-hop communities, sneakers were usually worn unlaced and with a large amount of gold jewelry, as well as headwraps.


    Hairstyles:
    The Jheri curl often spelled Jerry curl or Jeri Curl is a permed hairstyle that was common and popular among African American, Black Canadian, and Black British, especially during the 1980s and the 1990s. Invented by the hairdresser Jheri Redding, the Jheri curl gave the wearer a glossy, loosely curled look. It was touted as a "wash and wear" style that was easier to care for than the other popular chemical treatment of the day, the relaxer.



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pretty lady cooking
Hi there, I'm Annie.
Thanks for viewing my collection of wonderful soul-food dishes that my amazing ancestors cooked, and more than likely yours did too.

We didn't have much of anything back in the day and had to live off the scraps we were given. But like a famous rapper once said in his songs, we knew how to "make a dollar out of 15 cents" Enjoy.



sweet potatoes
Sweet Potatoes / Yams


Barbecue Ribs
Barbecue Ribs


Ham Hocks
Ham Hocks


Rice and Beans
Rice and Beans


Fish and Chips
Fish and Chips


Bean Soup
Bean Soup


Biscuits and Gravy
Biscuits and Gravy


Waffles
Waffles


Fried Chicken
Fried Chicken


Cornbread
Cornbread


Collard Greens
Collard Greens


Fried Liver
Fried Liver


Peach Preserves
Peach Preserves


Pinto Beans
Pinto Beans


Pound Cake
Pound Cake


Pork Chops
Pork Chops


Watermelon
Watermelon


black man hungry


(images - https://pixabay.com/)
Southern Cooking - Soul Food

    Have you ever wondered what African-Americans ate back in the day? Well, maybe we can help you with that. We've found the oldest known black cookbook to date.

    This cookbook was written by an actual former slave woman that had once lived on a plantation, but gained her freedom with the Emancipation Proclamation moving from Mobile, Alabama to San Francisco, California where she published an entirely excellent collection of 160 authentic and tasty recipes of the Old South entitled;

    "What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking"

    This book is indeed a rare gemstone with tons of actual recipes that black folks enjoyed back in the day, but Mrs. Fisher cooking wasn't limited to blacks only, many whites also loved her delicious recipes and persuaded her to make a cookbook.

    Here is just a sample of some of the southern foods mentioned in her book, and by the way, it wasn't called soul-food until the 1960's.

    Breakfast
  • Maryland Beat Biscuit
  • Waffles
  • Cream Cake
  • Flannel Cakes
  • Sallie Lund
  • Egg Corn Bread
  • Plantation Corn Bread
  • Light Bread


  • Broiled Meats
  • Beefsteak
  • Lamb or Mutton Chops
  • Pork Steak or Chops
  • Venison


  • Croquettes
  • Lamb
  • Chicken
  • Crab
  • Liver
  • Oyster
  • Fish


  • Cakes Etc.
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Almond
  • Feather
  • Sponge
  • Fruit
  • Jelly
  • Carolas
  • Ginger Cookies
  • Sweet Wafers


  • Pickels, Sauces Etc.
  • Sweet Cucumber Pickles
  • Sweet Cucumber Mangoes
  • Chow Chow
  • Creole Chow Chow
  • Cherry Chutney
  • Game Sauce
  • Compound Tomato
  • Napoleon
  • Sweet Pickle Peaches
  • Sweet Pickle Prunes
  • Sweet Watermelon Kind Pickle
  • Sauce for Boiled Fish or Mutton
  • Milanese Sauce
  • Sauce for Suet Pudding


  • Pies, Etc.
  • Pastry for making Pies of all kinds
  • Preparing the Fruit for Pies
  • Rhubarb
  • Apple
  • Peach
  • Lemon Pies
  • Cocoanut
  • Cream Apple
  • Sweet Potato
  • Gooseberry and Cherry
  • Light Bread
  • Mince
  • Blackberry Roll
  • Oyster


  • Puddings
  • Snow
  • Plum
  • Corn
  • Corn Fritters
  • Batter
  • Rice
  • Yorkshire
  • Cheese
  • Suet


  • Preserves, Spices, ETC.
  • Brandy Peaches
  • Quince Preserves
  • Syrups for Preserves
  • Preserved Peaches
  • Preserved Pears
  • Currant Jelly
  • Cranberry Jelly
  • Strawberry Jam
  • Raspberry and Currant Jam Combined
  • Marmalade Peach
  • Crab Apple Jelly
  • Blackberry Brandy
  • Blackberry Syrup for Dysentery in Children
  • Preserved Apricots
  • Apple Sauce for Roast Pork
  • Charlotte Eusse
  • Spiced Currants
  • Preserved Cherries


  • Roast Meats
  • Venison
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Pig
  • Veal
  • Turkey
  • Chicken
  • Birds
  • Quail
  • Domestic Duck
  • Wild Duck


  • Salads
  • Chicken
  • Veal
  • Lamb
  • Shrimp
  • Crab
  • Meat


  • Sherbets
  • Orange
  • Lemon
  • Pineapple


  • Soups, Chowders, Etc.
  • Beef
  • Ox-TaH
  • Calf 's Head
  • Mock Turtle
  • Green Turtle
  • Oyster Gumbo
  • Ochra Gumbo
  • Old Fashioned Turnip
  • Chicken
  • Corn and Tomato
  • Creole
  • Fish Chowder
  • Chicken Gumbo


  • Miscellaneous
  • Fricassed Chicken
  • Fried Chicken
  • Chicken fried Steak
  • Meat Stews or Entrees
  • Ice Cream
  • Boiled Turkey
  • Beef a la Mode
  • Neckbones
  • Spiced Round
  • Hog Maws
  • Stuffed Ham
  • Lima Beans
  • Jumberlie a Creole Dish
  • Baked Fish
  • Ribs, Beef or Pork
  • Boiled Corn
  • Peach Cobbler
  • Egg Plant Stuffed
  • Chitterlings or "Chitlins"
  • Corned Beef Hash
  • Ladies' Custard
  • Tonic Bitters
  • Terrapin Stew
  • Leaven Biscuit
  • Pap for infant Diet
  • Sorghum Syrup
  • Cracklins
  • Meringue for Pudding
  • Circuit Hash


  • What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking
    Paperback – March, 1995
    by Abby Fisher (Author), Karen Hess (Editor)

    http://www.amazon.com/Fisher-Knows-About-Southern-Cooking/dp/1557094039

 

Southern Jewel Million Dollar Pound Cake
(this recipe is not from Mrs. Fisher cookbook, but has been in Annie's family for generations, it's everyones favorite!)

    Butter: 1 pound
    Sugar: 3 cups
    Eggs: 6
    Milk: 3/4 cup
    Cake Flour: 4 cups (Soft as Silk Cake Flour)
    Baking Powder: 1 teaspoon
    Vanilla Flavor: 1 teaspoon
    Lemon Flavor: 1 teaspoon

    Directions:
    For best results, leave butter and eggs out overnight
    Cream butter well, add sugar and mix until butter and sugar look like whip cream.
    Beat each egg individually and then add with sugar and butter, mix well for at least a couple minutes.
    Add milk and cake flour a little at a time, then add flavorings.
    Spray Pam spray on entire round cake pan, and then add cake batter.
    Bake about 1 hour and 15 minutes at 325.
    Let cake cool for about 30 minutes, and then remove cake from cake pan.



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United States Census for Negroes
United States Census for African Americans
in the 1980s

pac man game

Marian Anderson
Marian Anderson
photo #104-yr-1955

 Lionel Hampton
Lionel Hampton at the Aquarium, New York
photo #102-yr-1908

Our Community in 1984
Newsworthy Events in the Black Community:

  • Opera singer Marian Anderson was the first recipient of the Eleanor Roosevelt Human Rights Award of the City of New York. She has been awarded honorary doctoral degrees from Howard University, Temple University and Smith College.

  • January 27, 1984 - While filming a Pepsi Cola commercial, Michael Jackson hair accidentally sets on fire, causing second-degree burns to his scalp.

  • 1984 - Musician Lionel Hampton and his band played at the University of Idaho's annual jazz festival, which was renamed the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival the following year.


  • HIV and without treatment, average survival time after infection with HIV is estimated to be 9 to 11 years. Trivia:Infection with HIV occurs by the transfer of blood, semen, vaginal fluid, pre-ejaculate, or breast milk. Within these bodily fluids, HIV is present as both free virus particles and virus within infected immune cells. AIDS was first clinically observed in 1981 in the United States. The initial cases were a cluster of injection drug users and gay men.

  • 1980s - Pac-Man is considered one of the classics of the medium, virtually synonymous with video games, and an icon of 1980s popular culture. Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and first released in Japan on May 22, 1980.


  • 1980 - Less than a school year differentiated the years of schooling attained by African Americans and white Americans born after 1980.

  • 1980s - The United States Population is 226,504,825 with a total of 26,482,349 being African Americans.




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RESOURCES:


Text_of_Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_Unported_License


#100 -   Public Domain image - By Tamla (Billboard, page 1, 27 April 1974) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#101 -   Public Domain image - By Brunswick Records (Billboard page 11) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#102 -   Public Domain image - By Markabq (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#103 -   Public Domain image - By Master Sgt. Cohen A. Young [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#104 -   Public Domain image - By Jesse_Jackson,_half-length_portrait_of_Jackson_seated_at_a_table,_July_1,_1983.jpg: Leffler, Warren K.derivative work: Fletcher6 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#105 -   Public Domain image - By The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (Publicizing Dangers of Crack Cocaine (078)) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

#106 -   Public Domain image - By New York World-Telegram and the Sun staff photographer: Fisher, Alan, photographer. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


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