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Snapping the Chain:
Ending Mental Health Stigma
in the African American Community
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African American Mental Health
by Vanessa Jackson 2
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Anti-Stigma Project
African American Clip
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    Village Talk - Youth & Suicide - What Every Parent Should Know

     Youth & Suicide


    AAMHI is excited about 2017 and the many “Village Talks” that we've planned, to continue the “conversation” concerning Mental Health.

    We ended 2016 with a beautiful Mental Health Christmas Gala that featured several dynamic speakers which represented a broad sector of our Community. I want to thank Pastor Virgil Jones, Jr. (Philippian Community Church); Dr. Jacqueline Conley (EWC), Bishop Trey and First Lady Cynthia Wright (Zion Hope Community Church); Officer Greg Burton (JSO); and Mrs. Selena Webster-Bass (CEO Lead Innovator), who all spoke from their hearts and brought words of inspiration, wisdom, knowledge and HOPE.

    One of the topics presented at the Gala dealt with our Youth, Depression and Suicide. We were given some very startling statistics regarding the rate of suicide amongst our Youth. We were also informed of ways to identify the early warning signs of depression and what we as parents or caregivers must be cognizant of when interacting with our children. Because of the tremendous response that we received from those in attendance to shed more light on this subject; AAMHI decided to start the year off focusing on our “Youth & Suicide – What Every Parent Should Know”.

    In this day and time, children have so much to contend with in Society, (ie school, homework, cell phones, social media, peer pressure, bullying, self-image, gangs, the need for acceptance etc.); and yet, the one thing that is STILL lacking is COMMUNICATION. Many are truly “suffering in silence” and don't know how to verbalize what they are feeling or thinking; and afraid to talk to anyone for fear of being judged. WE MUST begin to BRIDGE THE GAP!!!!!! Many warning signs are being missed or overlooked by parents, loved ones and caregivers.

    It is for this reason that AAMHI is so excited to have Jim Whited as our keynote speaker for this month's Village Talk, to be held on Sat. Feb. 18th. Not only is Jim a Nurse Practitioner, he is a Board Certified Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner specializing in Emergency, Family and Mental Health Medicines. Jim currently works with both adults and children in the arenas of mental health at Dr. Carlos Torrellas's Office, PSI and Community Rehabilitation Center.

    I've had the pleasure of hearing Dr. Jim speak, and I feel that he is one who truly has a “pulse” on what our children are dealing with; and how we as parents and caregivers can best guide them through “turbulent” waters.

    Again, AAMHI looks forward to seeing you on Feb 18th. Please bring a friend or family member; they'll thank you for the invitation.

    Register at https://villagetalkfeb2017.eventbrite.com

    God Bless, and don't forget to AIM-HIGH in all you do!!!!

    ooOoo


    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
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    5 Ways to Thrive in the Midst of Challenge and Despair

    Donna Stoneham, Ph.D.


    It’s easier to thrive when things are going well. It’s much harder to flourish in times of challenge or despair. The past nine-months have been particularly challenging for many as alarming events have unfolded at a pace never experienced before, including multiple terrorist attacks, the plight of refugees, black lives cut short, and police officers murdered. Add to that the most divisive US Presidential election ever and at times it feels as though things are spinning out of control.

    Donna Stoneham says, "We are facing a choice point in which we’ll either self-destruct or rise from the ashes of animosity and take the lead to create a better world. The choice we make has never been greater."

    Using her seven keys to thriving, Dr. Stoneham, executive coach and author of The Thriver’s Edge: Seven Keys to Transform the Way You Live, Love, and Lead, offers five ways to thrive and have some control in your life while in the midst of challenge, overwhelm or despair.

    Tip # 1: Trust and Focus on the Good Things in Your Life

    It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by all the suffering and hatred in the world. Denying it isn’t the answer, but neither is shutting down or viewing the world through a distorted lens. Knowing who and what we can trust and relying on that when times are hard is critical to keeping the balance we need to flourish.

    The Practice:

    Make a list of the good things in your life that you trust. Especially note the people who love you. Let these people serve as a refuge when you feel despair or overwhelmed. Reach out to them. Talk a walk. Grab coffee. Connect to your network of support and use it as a lifeline. Continue to expand your network of trust by adding at least one person every few months through work or other activities you regularly engage in. Isolation erodes trust, so if you’re feeling lonely, reconnect with a friend. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by the condition of the world, make a donation to a cause you believe in. Take a deep breath and think of what you’re grateful for. Maybe even say a prayer for those who need help. Focus on what’s good in the world, because there’s more good than bad when we allow ourselves to see it.

    Tip #2: Cultivate Resilience for Turbulent Times

    Think of resilience as a bank account that you can draw from. In order to have the resources you need when you need them most, keep adding to your account and keep it growing. Regular self-care practices and attitude adjustments are what keep your resilience account full. Cultivate resilience in the good times so you can draw on it when you need it most.

    The Practice:

    When times are challenging, it’s important to take extra good care of yourself, yet self-care often is sacrificed first. The best resilience practice when times are hard is to create a daily ten-minute Stress Free Zone. Do something every day for at least ten minutes that you find nurturing and/or inspiring. This could be taking a walk in nature and really taking in the beauty you see around you. It might be a daily ritual of mindfulness meditation to focus on your breathing to clear your mind and open your heart. It might be taking a bubble-bath at the end of a long day when you usually shower in the morning. It could be reading a passage from a book that inspires you with a hot cup of tea. Put your ten-minute Stress Free Zone on the calendar and keep it sacred. Don’t let anything steal that time from you even if it means getting up ten minutes earlier or going to bed ten minutes later. When you take care of yourself, you have more to give others, so don’t feel guilty. You’re just replenishing your bank account so the good you have to offer can be spread around!

    Tip # 3: Follow Your Inner Direction, Not the Pack

    Sometimes the news coverage and the fears espoused by those around you can be too much. If everyone around you is negative or frightened, whatever the issue is, it generally isn’t helpful to join in. Too many people in the same boat will eventually cause it to sink.

    The Practice:

    If you find yourself becoming a media junkie, and the rhetoric feels overwhelming, stop yourself, turn off the news, hop off twitter or Facebook and ask your intuition what you need to do right now to lift your mood. If you need to turn off the TV, then do it. If you need to read something that inspires you, then read that instead of the newspaper. If you need to express your frustration or fears in your journal, then do that. If you need to check in with someone you trust, pick up the phone. Just be mindful every day of whose boat you’re jumping into. Is the boat you’re in where you want to be mentally, emotionally and spiritually? If not, then what action do you need to take right now to get yourself to a more peaceful shore?

    Tip # 4: Don’t Look at the World through a Soda Straw, Expand Your Possibilities

    When you feel despair, challenged, or overwhelmed, it’s easy to feel constricted. It’s like looking at the world through a soda straw rather than as the vast panorama of expansiveness it is. It’s easy to get fixated on what’s broken rather than on what’s working. When you expand your perspective, you can see possibilities you’re unable to see in a constricted state and you have more options at your disposal.

    The Practice:

    When you’re feeling stressed, overwhelmed or in a state of despair, what does the soda straw you’re looking through allow you to see? What possibilities, if you expanded what you were willing to look at, might you see? Make a list of the limitations your current view of the issue imposes. Make a list of the possibilities that might be available if you allowed yourself to broaden your perspective. What actions do you need to take in order to see the glass as half-full, rather than half-empty? Are you willing to make that shift? What action could you take right now to help you do this? Who could help you if you asked for their support?

    Tip # 5: Be Responsible: Do What You Can Do and Pay It Forward

    When situations feel overwhelming or hopeless, it’s easy to feel helpless. Instead of collapsing into them, take those emotions and channel them for good. Sometimes even if we know we can’t fix something, it makes us feel better just to know we did our best to do our part. To paraphrase Mother Teresa, it’s not important that we do great things, but that we do small things with great love.

    The Practice:

    When you feel despair or overwhelm because of the state of the world, or even if you’re troubled by an issue that’s affecting your life close to home, what are one or two things you can do today to try and make it better? It might be signing a petition, calling your representative’s office, joining a march, writing a letter, setting a needed boundary or even having a difficult conversation with someone at home or at work. It might be writing a check for a cause you believe in, posting about the issue in social media, or writing a letter to the editor to draw attention to the cause. Maybe it’s looking inside yourself to see if there are any places where you still harbor a grudge or feel anger towards another that need to be released. We all need to be mindful about the kind of energy we’re contributing to the world. Are we filling the world with more compassion and care for others, or with more animosity or greed? Whatever you can do to seek to make the world a better place, take that action now and pay it forward. In challenging times, living on the thriver’s edge takes focus and practice and none of us accomplish it alone.


     Donna Stoneham, Ph.D.


    The Thriver’s Edge
    Seven Keys to Transform the Way You Live, Love and Lead
    Donna Stoneham, Ph.D.

    List $16.95
    Trade softcover 200 pages. Also available in Kindle
    ISBN: 978-1-63152-980-1
    Published by She Writes Press, Berkeley, CA

     Donna Stoneham, Ph.D.


    About Donna Stoneham, Ph.D.
    Donna Stoneham, PhD, is a master executive coach, transformational leadership expert, facilitator, author, speaker and popular media guest.

    For the past twenty-five years, Donna has helped several thousand Fortune 1000 and not-for-profit leaders, teams, and organizations unleash their power to thrive and create powerful results in their work and lives through her company, Positive Impact, LLC (www.positiveimpacllc.com.) Donna holds a Ph.D. with a concentration in Learning and Change in Human Systems from the California Institute of Integral Studies and was certified as an Integral Coach®.

    Donna is the author of the award winning book, The Thriver’s Edge: Seven Keys to Transform the Way You Live, Love, and Lead named by Buzz Feed as “Nine Awesome Books for Your Kick-Ass Career” and she’s a contributor in two upcoming books, The Coaching Code and Ask Coach (September, 2016). (www.donnastoneham.com). As one of the world's leading coaches, Donna will be featured in the upcoming full length documentary, Leap! The Coaching Movie (www.coachingmovie.com) (2017).

    Donna has written for the International Journal of Coaches in Organizations, TD Magazine, Conscious Lifestyle Magazine, and The Globe and Mail. She’s been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Investor’s Business Daily, and The Huffington Post and has been a guest on ABC, NBC, and Fox affiliates, Sirius Radio, IHeartRadio and on numerous radio shows throughout the US.

    When she’s not coaching, she enjoys swimming, sailing, philanthropic travel, writing, and enjoying a glass of wine on her deck with her spouse and rescue dogs in Pt. Richmond, CA.

    Other Story Ideas for You to Consider

    Are You Trading Your Passion for a Paycheck? Proven Strategies to Align Who You Are with What You Do

    When Striving Trumps Thriving: 3 Ways to Stop the Spread of the Af?uenza Virus

    More Afraid of Success than Failure? Shift Your Thinking from NARO to BOLD and Get Engaged with Life!

    Presence is the Present: How 1/3 of Parents Who Don’t Spend Enough Time with Their Kids Can Make It Better

    The Power of Authenticity: Reclaim What You Lost on Your Climb Up the Corporate Ladder

    Mad on Mondays? How to Cultivate Mindfulness for a Meaningful Life

    Change Your Billboard Top 40: 5 Tips for Quieting Your Inner Critic

    Be Careful Which Bus You Get On: 3 Ways to Avoid the Tragedy of Overwork

    Are You Passive or Proactive? 4 Questions to Help You Be the Driver Instead of the Passenger in Your Life and Career

    What People Are Saying

    “If you want to take your life to the next level of thriving, fulfillment, inner peace, love, joy, and all the important things we want in life and still be more effective at work, read The Thriver's Edge. I promise you'll be glad you did.”
    —Jack Canfield, New York Times best-selling author of The Success Principles and co-creator of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series

    “All too often, we let the busy-ness of every day take over the meaning of our lives. Reading this book will change that; by bringing trust and vision to consciousness, we can live and lead more expansively and successfully than ever. After reading The Thriver's Edge, you’ll have renewed enthusiasm and purpose for all that you do!”
    —Marshall Goldsmith author of New York Times bestseller What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

    “In a world dominated by fear-based approaches to success, The Thriver’s Edge offers an inspiring and life-affirming alternative. Donna Stoneham writes with the wisdom of one who has guided many people in manifesting their inner gifts.”
    —Tara Brach, Ph.D., author of Radical Acceptance and True Refuge

    "If you need to do some soul searching to find out how you can live with passion and on purpose, this book will serve as a warm hand on your back. The Thriver's Edge guides you gently toward the realization of all you can make possible."
    --Dawna Markova, Ph.D., author of I Will Not Die an Unlived Life and Collaborative Intelligence: Thinking Effectively with people who think differently.

    In The Thriver’s Edge, Donna Stoneham has masterfully distilled decades of life experience and professional expertise into seven practices essential to thriving. Skillfully presented in a clear and straightforward way, these practices come alive in all their depth and substance with stories and examples that ring true to the reader’s own experience. Stoneham’s suggestions for developing the seven keys are practical and doable. The series of reflective questions and her sage advice steadily guide readers in their quest to step into a bigger life, express their deepest potential, and become their greatest selves.
    —Linda Graham, MFT, author of Bouncing Back: Rewiring Your Brain for Maximum Resilience and Well-Being

    ooOoo


    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    Mental Health Walk & Village Talk


    JACKSONVILLE, FL – May 4, 2016 – The African American Mental Health Initiative (AAMHI) is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization based in Jacksonville, FL (pronounced Aim High)

    MENTAL ILLNESS does NOT have RESPECT of PERSONS!!! Each day we open our eyes, we are faced with the “potential” to meet some form of Mental DISTRESS. Whether it’s sitting in rush hour traffic; caring for someone who is ill, losing a loved one, or working stressful jobs etc. Life's “stressors” can strike at ANYTIME and cause people to SHUT DOWN!!! When this happens, we must recognize that it’s time to ASK for HELP!!!! That help can come from any number of resources within our Community (i.e. family member, friend, co-worker, caregiver, minister/clergy, therapist, psychologist, or mental health provider) – aka (the “Village”).

    What better way to start you’re a day on May 14th, than by meeting AAMHI at 7:00am for some “RISE & SHINE” and prepare to set the walk underway! The Opening Ceremony will begin at 7:30am; and the Walk kicking-off promptly at 8:00am!!!!!! After the WALK, we will gather back at Unity Plaza for a “VILLAGE TALK”! We have a GUEST PANEL comprised of various experts and professionals from the Community to share VALUABLE insights, information and resources regarding Mental Health. (Note: Q&A time will be allotted)! There will also be Vendor(s); Blood Pressure Screenings; Raffle & Door Prizes; Kids Play Area, Entertainment, Sign Language Interpreter will be available, and more!

    AAMHI would like to recognize Delores Barr Weave Fund for their “Diamond Sponsorship” of this event and their unwavering philanthropic commitment to the Jacksonville Community.

    AAMHI looks forward to seeing YOU, as we Walk - “DOWN BY the RIVERSIDE” for the CAUSE of MENTAL HEALTH!!!

    Schedule of event
    Walk Registration: 7am to 7:30am
    Opening Ceremony 7:30 to 7:45am
    Warm Up: 7:45am
    Walk start up time: 8am
    Village Talk: 10am to 12pm

    Address: Unity Plaza, 220 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202
    Register: http://aamhimentalwalkvillagetalk2016.eventbrite.com
    AAMHI Inc.
    4210 Emerald Bay Drive
    Jacksonville, FL 32277

    For more information about AAMHI, please contact Ann Marlow 904-479-6741 and/or email aamhiinc@gmail.com. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/aamhi.aimhigh


    ooOoo


    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    Mental Health is Probably More Than You Realize

    By Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC


    May is Mental Health Awareness Month. It’s a good thing it is, too, for there’s a whole lot to be aware of. For example, when many people think about mental health, they tie it to what they think is its opposite: mental illness. It’s a natural thing to think, but that doesn’t mean it’s correct. It isn’t correct. Mental health is too enormous of a concept to be reduced to this polar comparison. Mental health is all-encompassing in a way many people don’t quite realize. That’s why we have this month dedicated to mental health awareness.

    To understand what mental health is, it’s helpful to begin by looking at what it isn’t. Mental health is not the absence of mental illness. Mental health is for everyone, including people living with one or more diagnosed mental illnesses.

    Think of mental health and mental illness as unique states of beings that are a bit like siblings. They’re related, but they exist separately, in their own right. They both clamor for attention, and sometimes one is more boisterous than the other; also, each one tends to want to live without the other one getting in the way. Just as one sibling exists despite what the other is doing, so, too, does mental health exist even in the presence of mental illness.

    Further, mental health isn’t something reserved for the lucky few, the charmed in life. Neither is mental health something that you either have or you don’t. Mental health is for every single person on the planet, and each one of us can achieve it even as we’re dealing with challenges, stress, and tough times.

    There are certain things to be aware of when it comes to mental health, because this awareness helps us achieve mental health.

  • Mental health is about our thoughts. It’s our perspective, our attitude. A proven and respected counseling approach known as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) teaches that our problems, no matter what they are, aren’t the problem. Rather, it’s the thoughts we have about them that cause us to experience anxiety, stress, and other discomfort. When we become aware of our thoughts and learn to choose them intentionally, we increase our mental health and sense of life satisfaction even as the external problems remain.

  • Mental health is about our emotions. We humans have a seemingly infinite and indefatigable variety and supply of feelings. Mental health doesn’t equate to only positive emotions, just as the negative emotions don’t equate to the absence of mental health. Mental health means experiencing the entire gamut of human emotions and being able to identify what you’re feeling. When you can do that, you can recognize what you’re feeling as temporary and separate from who you are as a person. Being able to do this is an important part of mental health.

  • Mental health is about behavior and actions. No matter what we’re dealing with, even if we live with a mental illness, we can take an active role in enhancing our mental health. We can create our life worth living. What things can you do every day to enhance your own mental health, no matter what problems you’re facing?

  • Mental health is our very being. It encompasses our thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. Mental health is our psychological state of well-being that makes up who we are and how we experience life and the world around us. It exists no matter what, and we can experience mental health even in the toughest of times.


  • Mental health really is more than many people realize. Mental health involves thoughts and emotions and behaviors. Mental health is also something you create, and you can do it every moment of every day. It’s powerful. You don’t have to wait for things to be perfect in order to achieve mental health. Increase your awareness, and shape your thoughts, emotions, and behaviors right now. You don’t have to wait for the absence of problems or of mental illness in order to achieve mental health.

    About the Author:
    With credentials as a Nationally Certified Counselor and personal experience with mental health care, novelist and columnist Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC uses writing to increase understanding of and compassion for people living with mental illness. Her last book, My Life in a Nutshell: A Novel (Inkwater Press, 2014) was awarded a Kirkus Star, an honor given by Kirkus Reviews “to books of remarkable merit”, as well as being named to Kirkus Reviews’ Best Books of 2014, and received a coveted “recommended” rating from The US Review of Books. Peterson’s sophomore novel, Losing Elizabeth, was the recipient of Storytellers Campfire’s top honor, The Marble Book Award, for “being a book which has made a significant difference in the world”. Her third novel, Leave of Absence (Inkwater Press, 2013) was named as a finalist in the National Indie Excellence Awards. Peterson, a public speaker on mental health topics, also currently writes for HealthyPlace.com, America’s Mental Health Channel, and their accompanying blog, Anxiety-Schmanxiety, which was dubbed one of the “Top 10 Blogs of 2014”. Twenty-Four Shadows(Apprentice House), Peterson’s newest novel, available in May, 2016, has already earned the coveted “recommended” rating from the US Review of Books.

    Twenty-Four Shadows is available May 1, 2016, in ebook and paperback format from Amazon, Barnes & Noble.com and select independent retailers.

    Learn more and connect with the author at www.tanyajpeterson.org, and on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    Zine Review: Black Women & Self-Care


    Black Women & Self-Care


    Black Women & Self Care: Thoughts on Mental Health, Oppression & Healing
    Perzine, Naomi Moyer, 21 pgs, etsy.com/ca/shop/elastiquedesigns, $5.25

    Mental health in the Black community is not often properly dealt with, especially in regards to women. We are often expected to assume the role of “strong black woman” without allowing ourselves even a moment to be weak. That is why I was so excited to read this zine by Naomi Moyer. Moyer is an artist that I have been following for awhile (she also produces the amazing series Afrocentric Postcards, which you can buy along with this zine in the Etsy shop listed above.) Black Women & Self Care: Thoughts on Mental Health, Oppression and Healing is a self-help guide that tackles four aspects of black women’s mental health (Anger, Depression, P.T.S.D, and Dealing with White Supremacy) and offers a holistic approach on how to address and work through these issues.

    I found that the article on Surviving White Supremacy to be the most interesting. I did not previously think of White Supremacy as a mental health issue, but Moyer explains: “As black women, we experience side effects of white supremacy and patriarchy on a daily basis through racism, discrimination and misogyny. Dealing with folks who are sexist, transphobic, homophobic, racist or folks who benefit from and sustain white supremacy can be draining.” This is a daily reality for myself, and often I struggle to find the words on how to express this or how to effectively deal with it. Moyer suggests we know our space zones, address these issues in the moment, identify the problem, and set daily reminders of positive things in our lives. She’s provided an effective start for the self-care process.

    Moyer opens a space for discussion and healing through her zine. She ends with an amazing section called DIY for the Soul where she leaves practical remedies that you can create and use to help women get through these rough moments. Moyer summons and provides black girl magic throughout these pages in such a radical amazing way. I think the most important message this zine reiterates is be kind, be gentle and take care of yourself. Thank you, Naomi Moyer, for this amazing reminder. (Naomi B.)

    - See more at:
    http://www.brokenpencil.com/news/26570

    Join Newsletter:
    http://www.brokenpencil.com/newsletter


    ooOoo


    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    AAMHI presents “A Closer Look at Combating Mental Illness and Its Triggers” Village Talk

    A Monthly Symposium


    “A Closer Look at Combating Mental Illness and It’s Triggers”

    Part Three of Three Part Discussion Series

    Because “Post Holiday Blues” can last well into the month of January; we will discuss ways in which to “Combat” these feelings; especially as it relates to STRESS and DEPRESSION!!

    Professional Speakers
    Terry D. Samuels, MA
    Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern
    Certified Temperament Counselor

    Dr. Wilbert Thomas III, PhD, LCPC, CLC
    New Image Professional Counseling & Life Coaching

    Testimonial
    Carolyn Rentrope
    Public Affairs Coordinator and Producer for WJEB-TV

    January 23, 2016
    10:00 am — 1:00 pm

    Community Rehabilitation Center
    623 Beechwood, Jacksonville, FL 32206
    (Parking Entrance located on 41st Street)
    Drive to Gateway Mall turn right on 44th Street
    Wendy’s on corner turn right on 41st Street
    CRC will be on the left side
    A lite lunch will be provided
    RSVP: http://aamhi-villagetalk-01232016.eventbrite.com, call, or email aamhiinc@gmail.com
    Send FaceBook Friend Request
    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/aamhi.aimhigh


    village talk

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    The articles on this site are provided as a public service and to be used for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content. Use at your own risk.

    No Endorsement:
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    Five Common Misperceptions About Transgender Individuals

    Dr. Kat, America's leading sexologist, calls out common untruths about being transgender


    Los Angeles, California – May 20, 2015 – With the Bruce Jenner interview still garnering an unprecedented amount of public attention — currently well over 2.7 million hits on YouTube — there’s a great deal of buzz about what it means to be a persona who is transgender.

    “All of this talk about transgender is a good thing,” said Dr. Kat Van Kirk., clinical sexologist. “Unfortunately there’s still a lot of misunderstanding out there.”

    To set the record straight, Dr. Kat compiled a list of the top five ways transgender continues to be confused:

    1. “Sex” and “Gender” are the same thing. Sex is a category assigned at birth usually based on external genitalia. Gender can be based on many factors. It is the internal feeling of maleness or femaleness that we each experience as we grow up.

    2. The terms transgender, transsexual, transvestite are all the same thing. Nope. Transgender (TG) is an umbrella term. Being TG has to do with one’s internal feelings of gender identity – maleness and femaleness and how the need to express that gender through clothes etc. Transsexual is an older, outdated term that may mean someone has had full genital and breast surgery. Transvestite has been replaced with the term “cross-dresser.” Someone who cross-dresses (typically a heterosexual man), occasionally wears the clothes of the opposite sex, but they have no desire to live full time as the opposite sex.

    3. Being transgendered means you are “trapped” in the body of the opposite sex. Many people refer to someone who is TG as having been “born a man” or “born a woman.” This is not accurate. We are all “assigned” our sex when we are born based on our external genitalia. This can mean that internal genitalia can be different, in addition to chromosomal differences that would contribute to feeling like the opposite gender as we grow up. It’s never safe to make assumptions as gender is considered to have an entire spectrum of possibilities – so much so, that some individuals do not identify as either. Some inter-sexed people do eventually identify as TG and some don’t. It should all always left it up to the individual to self identify.

    4. The holy grail of being transgendered is “passing” as the opposite sex. This used to be more the case when people had to worry about being accepted in their communities. This is far less of an issue now, as we are all realizing that gender and gender expression varies widely. Some people are perfectly happy to be living their version of whatever gender they identify as. This may mean that they aren’t interested in how other people view them but more about their own self-acceptance of who they are.

    5. A transgendered person has to get the whole surgery to be considered transgender or transsexual. It used to be that people would refer to themselves as pre or post op transsexuals. We now know that not everyone requires the various surgeries or hormones to consider themselves TG. There are some people who have had breast and genital surgery (with or without plastic surgery – often referred to as sex reassignment surgery, SRS) who still refer to themselves as trans-sexual but that term isn’t as commonly used as it once was.

    6. Sexual orientation and gender are linked. Your sexual orientation does not typically change with your gender identity. Meaning that if you were always attracted to one sex or the other – or both sexes, that tends to continue whether or not you begin living as a new sex. That being said, some people do feel that they might want to experiment with their sexuality.

    About Dr. Kat
    Dr. Kat Van Kirk is a licensed marriage and family therapist and clinical sexologist. She runs the website: drkat.com and is the resident expert for Adam and Eve (adamandeve.com). She also is the author of The Married Sex Solution: A Realistic Guide to Saving Your Sex Life, and a media personality. Follow her on Facebook: facebook.com/drkatvankirk or Twitter: @drkatsexchat


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    Depression: a barrier to communication in couples?


    A massive 6.7% of the US population are affected by depressive disorders. As well as pessimism, irritability, pain and exhaustion, depression is also proven to affect communication and ability to maintain relationships. This article in Communication Monographs explores depression and relational uncertainty within couples and the causal effect on communication behaviours.

    Depressed individuals are known to withdraw from negativity or social challenge. Speculated motivations for avoidance include feelings of futility and inhibition; use as an emotional coping strategy; wish to preserve the relationship; and fear of conflict. This behaviour is detrimental to relationships causing lack of problem resolution, missed bonding opportunities, lack of closeness and questions over commitment.

    Leanne K. Knobloch et al. seek to highlight uncertainty amongst depressed couples as a catalyst to communication barriers. Uncertainty about the future of relationships; the stability and significance to each person is known to cause topic avoidance amongst platonic relationships in friends and family. The authors hypothesise a likely similar effect on romantic couples affected by depression. Their study examined 126 couples, one or both of whom diagnosed depressed, most married and almost half parents. Subjects completed an online survey measuring depressive symptoms, relational uncertainty and topic avoidance on a point scale. Interestingly the majority of surveys, showed a positive association between relational uncertainty and topic avoidance. Fascinating differences were observed between men vs. women, cohabiting vs. married and depressed vs. partner.

    These novel findings show the combination of depression and uncertainty predicts topic avoidance and has ramifications for treatment methods and outcomes in securing the happiness and safety of both partners. The authors quote “Our results also have pragmatic value for suggesting that relational uncertainty may be a site of intervention for helping people with depressive symptoms be more comfortable discussing challenging issues…(and)… as a step toward unravelling the complexities of people’s avoidance behaviour in the context of depression.” They urge further research at the junction between depression, uncertainty and communication to identify methods of halting the cycle.

    published by Taylor & Francis
    * Read the full article online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03637751.2014.998691

    About Taylor & Francis Group
    Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

    From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

    About the National Communication Association
    The National Communication Association (NCA) advances Communication as the discipline that studies all forms, modes, media, and consequences of communication through humanistic, social scientific, and aesthetic inquiry. NCA serves the scholars, teachers, and practitioners who are its members by enabling and supporting their professional interests in research and teaching. Dedicated to fostering and promoting free and ethical communication, NCA promotes the widespread appreciation of the importance of communication in public and private life, the application of competent communication to improve the quality of human life and relationships, and the use of knowledge about communication to solve human problems.

    For more information, visit natcom.org, follow us on Twitter at @natcomm, and find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalCommunicationAssociation.


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    (BPRW) Black Psychologists and Activists to Focus on Creating a Culture of Emotional Wellness


    (BLACK PR WIRE) – The Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi) and Community Healing Network, Inc., (CHN) today announced that they are sponsoring a Congressional Black Caucus Forum during the 44th Annual Legislative Conference on Thursday, September 25, 2014, from 2pm to 4pm at the. Washington DC Convention Center, Room 145A. The Forum, entitled “From Trauma to Wellness,” will address the underlying causes of mental health disparities and strategies for creating a culture of mental health and emotional wellness in the black community.

    “Our community’s mental health,” said Dr. Rowe, “depends on our healing from the emotional legacies of enslavement and racism.”
    Panelists will include: Dr. James Jackson, Director of the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan; Dr. Jacqueline Mattis, Professor, Department of Psychology, Interim Director, Center for the Study of Black Youth in Context, University of Michigan; Dr. Taasogle Daryl Rowe, President, The Association of Black Psychologists; Dr. Cheryl Tawede Grills, Immediate Past President, The Association of Black Psychologists; Enola Aird, Founder and President, Community Healing Network, Inc. ; Dr. Lonnie Snowden, Professor of the Graduate School, Health Policy and Management Program, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley; and Cheryl Mayo Williams, Senior Director of Population Health, Children’s Medical Center.

    “Our community’s mental health,” said Dr. Rowe, “depends on our healing from the emotional legacies of enslavement and racism.”

    This Forum is a key part of ABPsi’s and CHN’s continuing efforts to mobilize the Black community to overcome and overturn the myth of Black inferiority, the underlying cause of mental and physical health disparities in the Black community, the devaluing of the lives of Black children, and many of the other challenges facing the Black community.

    “At the root of so much what ails our community,” said Aird, “is the toxic idea that our lives are less valuable than the lives of others. Overcoming and overturning that idea is the key to transforming our lives.”

    According to Dr. Grills, “the cumulative effects of four hundred years of historical and continuing trauma must be addressed.”

    About ABPsi–ABPsi is a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization that promotes the profession of African psychology and develops programs to alleviate problems of Black communities and other ethnic groups. www.abpsi.org

    About CHN–is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization working to build a global grassroots movement to overcome and overturn the lie of Black inferiority. www.communityhealingdays.com


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    (BPRW) Black Psychologists and Activists Call for Congressional Hearings on the Effects of the Lie of Black Inferiority


    (BLACK PR WIRE) – Pointing to the verdict in the Jordan Davis case and widespread concern about the continued devaluing of the lives of Black children, the Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi) and Community Healing Network, Inc. (CHN) today called on the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) to schedule public hearings on the continuing effects of the lie of Black inferiority and ways to eradicate it.

    In a letter to Caucus Chairwoman, Marcia L. Fudge, CHN and ABPsi noted that this week, on February 20, the European Parliament is holding a hearing on “Afrophobia,” and urged the CBC to hold similar proceedings. CHN and ABPsi said that the use of the term “Afrophobia” draws attention to the “fear, hostility, and discrimination that are all too often directed at people of African descent. In calling for Congressional hearings on the present-day effects of the lie of Black inferiority, we seek to illuminate the underlying causes of Afrophobia.”

    CHN and ABPsi called for an immediate scheduling of hearings and offered to help the CBC by identifying experts and resources.

    The letter to the CBC is an outgrowth of a collaboration between CHN and ABPsi that is engaging increasing numbers of Black mental health professionals and other activists to help Black people overcome the lie of Black inferiority and the emotional legacies of enslavement and racism.

    According to Enola Aird, president of CHN, “Negative stereotypes, based on the lie of Black inferiority, are literally killing Black children, and we must address the root causes of these tragedies.”

    Taasogle Daryl Rowe, Ph.D., president of ABPsi, said, “For nearly 400 years, the world has been fed toxic lies about people of African ancestry and they continue to exact a heavy toll on Black people in every conceivable way. It is time to stop repeating them to ourselves, to each other and letting others teach them as truth.”

    ABPsi past president, Cheryl Tawede Grills, Ph.D., said “These hearings would be especially timely given the racial injustices that continue to unfold in the United States, unabated even by the passage of time and the presence of a Black president.”

    The letter to the CBC is a key part of a public awareness initiative launched by CHN this month called Celebrating Our History, Transforming Our Present, and Taking Control of Our Destiny--to make the case that emotional emancipation is the key to transforming Black communities.

    About ABPsi–ABPsi is organized exclusively for charitable and educational purposes. As a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization, ABPsi seeks to promote and advance the profession of African psychology, influence and effect social change, and develop programs that address and work to alleviate problems of Black communities and other ethnic groups. www.abpsi.org

    About CHN–A 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization, CHN is working to build a global grassroots movement for the emotional emancipation of Black people. Its aim is to engage a critical mass of Black people in the movement by the year 2019, the 400th anniversary of the forced arrival of Africans at Jamestown colony. www.CommunityHealingNet.org

    February 19, 2014
    The Honorable Marcia L. Fudge
    Chair, Congressional Black Caucus
    United States House of Representatives
    2344 Rayburn House Office Building
    Washington, D.C. 20515

    Dear Chairwoman Fudge:
    This week, the European Parliament is holding a public hearing on “Afrophobia,” a specific form of racism that targets Black people. In light of the verdict in the Jordan Davis case and widespread expressions of concern about the continued devaluing of the lives of Black children, we are writing on behalf of the Association of Black Psychologists and Community Healing Network to urge the Congressional Black Caucus to hold similar proceedings.

    Specifically, we call on the Caucus to hold comprehensive public hearings on the continuing effects of the lie of Black inferiority--including the violence against Black youth--and ways to eradicate it.

    In using the term “Afrophobia,” the European Parliament rightly draws attention to the fear, hostility, and discrimination that are all too often directed at people of African descent. In calling for Congressional hearings on the present-day effects of the lie of Black inferiority, we seek to illuminate the underlying causes of Afrophobia.

    The lie of Black inferiority was devised nearly 400 years ago to justify the enslavement, colonization, and subjugation of African people in the United States and around the world. For centuries, powerful negative stereotypes based on that lie have shaped perceptions of Black people as less than human. Enslavement and colonization were ended. Laws aimed at promoting racial equality have been passed. But the lie of Black inferiority has remained unchallenged. And it is still very much with us today.

    It continues to shape perceptions of Black people the world over. It contributes to the criminalization of Black men and to the presumption that Black defendants and victims are often guilty. It fuels the Black-White achievement gap, contributes to the epidemic of violence against and among Black youth, and ultimately promotes the dehumanization of Black people and the devaluation of Black lives. Black people are resilient, but centuries of living with the weight of the lie of Black inferiority have left many Black communities in emotional distress.

    Community Healing Network and the Association of Black Psychologists have been working together since 2009 to spark the creation of a global grassroots network of self-help groups focused on overcoming the lie of Black inferiority. We are working to build a worldwide movement for the emotional emancipation, healing, wellness, and empowerment of Black people. We have put into place key elements to build this movement, including:

    • the annual celebration of Community Healing Days on the third weekend of every October, to put “time for healing” on the Black community’s agenda;

    • the Defy the Lie and Embrace the Truth Pledge campaign, to raise awareness of the continuing negative effects of the lie of Black inferiority and to encourage Black people to make personal commitments to emotional emancipation;

    • the Community Healing Institute, which brings together Black mental health professionals to develop resources to help local leaders establish and sustain emotional wellness initiatives; and

    • the development of Emotional Emancipation (EE) Circles--safe, flexible gatherings in which we as Black people can share our stories, deepen our understanding of the impact of historical forces on our emotional lives, and learn essential emotional wellness skills to help us be at our best.

    This internal community work is crucial. Equally imperative are comprehensive national and international efforts to extinguish the lie of Black inferiority. Even as we work to address many other societal problems and the symptoms of the lie of Black inferiority, such as racial discrimination in the criminal justice system, we must also deal with the underlying cause.

    Four hundred years are more than enough.

    We urge you to schedule hearings on this crucial issue immediately, and we would be happy to assist the Caucus in identifying experts and resources. Thank you.

    Sincerely,
    The Association of Black Psychologists
    Daryl Taasogle Rowe, Ph.D., President
    Cheryl Tawede Grills, Ph.D., Past President

    Community Healing Network, Inc.
    Enola G. Aird, Founder and President
    Omar Neal, Vice Chair, Board of Advisors


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    (BPRW) Black Psychologists Join Forces to Launch Global Movement for Emotional Emancipation


    (BLACK PR WIRE) – New Haven, CT, October 17, 2013 – The Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi, www.abpsi.org) and Community Healing Network, Inc. (CHN, www.communityhealingnet.org) announced today that psychologists in more than 20 cities in the United States and around the world will launch Emotional Emancipation Circles in connection with the 6th annual celebration of Community Healing Days, October 18, 19, and 20, 2013.

    Emotional Emancipation (EE) Circles are a culturally-grounded, research-based process to help Black people overcome the lie of Black inferiority and the emotional legacies of enslavement and racism. EE Circles are designed to create safe spaces in which Black people can work together to heal from internalized racism and historical trauma. Community Healing Days are an annual celebration designed by CHN to put “time for healing” on the Black community’s agenda and to serve as a catalyst for the creation of year-round healing initiatives. This year’s celebration comes as the October edition of the journal Social Science and Medicine releases the results of an international study finding that children “experience poor mental health, depression, and anxiety” as a result of racism.

    The psychologists’ concerted efforts are the outgrowth of a three-year collaboration between CHN and ABPsi. According to Dr. Taasogle Daryl Rowe, president of ABPsi, “too many of our children and too many adults are in emotional distress as a result of the lie of Black inferiority, and we are committed to helping build a worldwide grassroots movement to free our community from it once and for all.”

    Enola Aird, president of CHN, said that “the emotional legacies of enslavement and racism make it difficult for the Black community to take the steps necessary to address the pressing problems before it. In order to empower ourselves to overcome the challenges confronting us, Black people everywhere must focus sharply on the goals of emotional emancipation, healing, and wellness.” “Emotional Emancipation Circles,” said Dr. Cheryl Tawede Grills, past-president of ABPsi, “can be an instrument for the liberation of our people’s minds, hearts, and spirits. They can help us be more aware of the past and the present so we can move forward with clarity and conviction.”

    Dr. Rowe and Dr. Grills will be leading webinars to help local leaders establish EE Circles.

    CHN and ABPsi also issued a reminder of CHN Advisory Board Chair, Dr. Maya Angelou’s call for people to “Wear Sky Blue during Community Healing Days…to show our collective determination to turn the pain of the blues into the sky blue of unlimited possibilities.”

    Contact Information
    Andrew Carter
    203-295-4394

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    (BPRW) Psychologists to Address Deep-Seated Issues Raised by the Trayvon Martin Tragedy


    - Ft. Washington, MD, July 23, 2013 -

    (BLACK PR WIRE) – The Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi) opened its 45th annual international convention today in New Orleans, LA, announcing plans to mobilize its membership and allies to help spark the creation of a national grassroots network of self-help groups focused on psychological and emotional issues raised in the Black community by the tragic death of Trayvon Martin.

    Dr. Cheryl Grills, president of ABPsi, said, "We must address the psychological implications of the centuries-long devaluation of Black life. Last week, President Obama observed that the ‘history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws’ affects how African Americans view the Trayvon Martin tragedy. That history has also profoundly devalued the lives of Black people, and as a community, we must take time to heal."

    The ABPsi initiative is the outgrowth of a three-year collaboration with Community Healing Network, Inc. (CHN). Working with CHN, ABPsi has developed a research-based, culturally-sensitive guide to help promote healing conversations. Members of ABPsi will be briefed during multiple sessions at the New Orleans convention on a ground-breaking strategy called Emotional Emancipation (EE) Circles, designed to create safe spaces in which Black people can come together to: 1) share stories and explore the impact of history on emotions and relationships; 2) learn and practice essential emotional wellness skills; and 3) work to transform how Black people see themselves and how the world sees Black people.

    ABPsi members will also be invited to join a new online community created by ABPsi and CHN called The Way Back Home, where they will be trained through webinars, with the goal of launching EE Circles in ABPsi chapters across the country in October during Community Healing Days, an annual celebration created by CHN to put “time for healing” on the Black community’s agenda.

    According to Enola G. Aird, founder and president of CHN, “we must focus on the root cause of what happened to Trayvon Martin: the fact that for almost four hundred years across the globe Black people have been seen as less than human. It is well past time for us to address the root cause. It is well past time for us to reclaim our humanity.”

    “The devaluation of Black lives,” said Daryl Rowe, president-elect of ABPsi, “undermines Black people’s sense of self-worth, the well-being of Black families, and Black children’s sense of positive possibilities. We believe that in order to empower itself to overcome its many challenges, the Black community must focus sharply on the goals of emotional emancipation, healing, and wellness, and we intend to be leaders in this crucial movement.” ABPsi members will be meeting in New Orleans from July 23rd through July 27th.

    About ABPsi-- ABPsi is organized exclusively for charitable and educational purposes. As a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization, ABPsi seeks to promote and advance the profession of African psychology, influence and effect social change, and develop programs that address and work to alleviate problems of Black communities and other ethnic groups. www.abpsi.org

    About CHN-- A 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization, CHN is the creator and leader of the annual celebration of Community Healing Days (on the third weekend of every October, to put “time for healing” on the Black community’s agenda) and the Community Healing Institute (designed to bring Black mental health professionals together to help local leaders establish and sustain self-help groups focused on emotional emancipation, healing, wellness, and empowerment for Black people.) The ABPsi initiative is a key part of CHN’s campaign to engage a critical mass of Black people in the movement for emotional emancipation by the year 2019, the 400th anniversary of the forced arrival of Africans at Jamestown colony. www.CommunityHealingNet.org

    Contact Information
    Anisha Lewis
    ABPsi Executive Director
    301-449-3082

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    The articles on this site are provided as a public service and to be used for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content. Use at your own risk.

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The Psychology of Disappointment
Source: Best Psychology Degrees


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    (BPRW) The Association of Black Psychologists and Community Healing Network to Provide Solutions to Dilemmas Posed by the film Dark Girls Premiering on Oprah Winfrey Network


    (BLACK PR WIRE) – Ft. Washington, MD, June 20, 2013 – The Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi) announced today that, in response to a request from the Oprah Winfrey Network, it is providing resources to facilitate healing conversations about the ground-breaking film, Dark Girls, which will have its world television premiere on OWN on Sunday, June 23, 2013. ABPsi’s resources will be available at www.abpsi.org.

    In addition, ABPsi is providing information about its collaboration with the Community Healing Network (CHN), which is working to mobilize the Black community to overcome internalized beliefs about the inferiority of Black skin, Black hair, and other characteristics associated with people of African ancestry.

    Dark Girls explores the blows to self-esteem faced by dark-skinned women all over the world, and ABPsi psychologists have compiled a summary of the issues raised in the film and their psychological implications, emotional wellness tips, and links to helpful resources.

    Dr. Cheryl Grills, President of ABPsi said “Dark Girls gives us an opportunity to take a soul-searching look at the effects of racism on the self-image of Black women personally and collectively, particularly as it relates to complexion, so that where healing is needed, we can heal; where our tools for resilience and defying the lie protected us, we can lift them up for celebration and increased use.”

    According to Dr. Daryl Rowe, President-Elect of ABPsi, “Dark Girls is a powerful documentary that looks behind the curtain of color-consciousness and its damaging effects within the African American community. It provides penetrating insights into the historical, cultural, relational, and personal challenges that internalized racism wreaks within and between persons of African ancestry.”

    To address the broad range of problems related to the idea of Black inferiority, ABPsi is working with CHN to create a network of self-help groups focused on emotional emancipation, healing, and wellness for Black people. ABPsi has developed a ground-breaking, research-based Emotional Emancipation (EE) Circles Toolkit and Curriculum in partnership with CHN, which will be available to the public in August 2013. EE Circles are safe, flexible gatherings in which Black people can come together to share stories, learn more about the impact of historical forces on emotions, and learn and practice essential emotional wellness skills.

    “We believe,” said Community Healing Network President Enola Aird, “that the only real solution to the problems illuminated in Dark Girls is a vibrant grassroots movement for the emotional emancipation of Black people, and it is our hope that EE Circles will be catalysts for personal reflection, dialogue, and action that will help heal, revitalize, and transform the Black community.”

    For more information, visit www.abpsi.org and www.CommunityHealingNet.org.

    Contact Information
    Anisha Lewis
    Executive Director
    301-449-3082

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    (BPRW) Community Healing Network and Black Psychologists Call on Black People to Commit to Emotional Wellness


    (BLACK PR WIRE) – In observance of the fifth annual celebration of Community Healing Days, October 19-21, 2012, a coalition consisting of Community Healing Network, Inc. (CHN), the Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi), and the Mayor and key leaders in the City of Tuskegee, Alabama, today called on Black people everywhere to make personal commitments to emotional wellness by taking the Pledge to Defy the Lie and Embrace the Truth at www.communityhealingnet.org.

    black mental health
    The Pledge is a key part of the Coalition’s effort to call attention to the continuing impact of racism on the overall well-being of African Americans and the pressing need for a grassroots movement for emotional emancipation, healing, and wellness for Black people across the African Diaspora. The Coalition pointed to growing signs of emotional distress in the Black community, including the facts that:

    Homicide is the leading cause of death for young Black males.

    Depression among Black women is almost 50% higher than it is among White women.

    Only 52 percent of Black males graduate from high school in four years, compared to 78 percent of White males.

    According to the American Psychiatric Association, “racism and racial discrimination adversely affect mental health by diminishing the victim’s self-image, confidence, and optimal mental functioning.”

    And a recent study by the American Psychological Association found that “perceived racism may cause mental health symptoms similar to trauma and could lead to some physical health disparities between blacks and other populations in the United States.”

    “Our aim,” said Enola Aird, founder and president of CHN, “is to mobilize Black people to overcome the lie of Black inferiority which has, for centuries, justified and fueled racism against Black people. The Defy the Lie and Embrace the Truth campaign is focused on one simple message: It’s time for us as Black people to claim our full humanity.”

    “As a people,” said ABPsi president Cheryl Grills, “for nearly 400 years, we have been fed toxic lies about our history, worth, and value as people of African ancestry, and those lies are all rooted in one big lie: the lie of Black inferiority.”

    According to Daryl Rowe, president-elect of ABPsi, “the lie of Black inferiority contributes to many of the challenges we face as a community. If we want to reverse the negative trends for Black people, we must attend to the struggle for what Dr. King called ‘psychological freedom.’”

    Mayor Omar Neal, leader of the Tuskegee Community Healing Initiative, said, “In spite of significant progress in increasing civil rights for Black people, and advances in our social standing, including the election of the nation’s first Black president, the lie of Black inferiority persists. It drives the world’s perceptions of Black people and our perceptions of ourselves.”

    The Defy the Lie and Embrace the Truth campaign is the launching pad for the Coalition’s mobilizing efforts for the next seven years--until 2019, the 400th anniversary of the forced arrival of Africans in Jamestown colony. The initiative, designed to engage a critical mass of Black people in the movement for emotional emancipation by 2019, is comprised of several key elements, including:

    • Providing suggestions of steps people can take to fulfill the Pledge at www.communityhealingnet.org;

    • Developing a wide range of emotional wellness trainings and resources to help local leaders establish and maintain Emotional Emancipation Circles, local self-help groups focused on emotional emancipation, healing, and wellness for Black people;

    • Encouraging CHN’s and ABPsi’s members and supporters and Tuskegee’s citizens to take the pledge and to spread the word to encourage all their family and friends to take the Pledge;

    • Working with young spoken word and other artists in the Black community to deliver strong Defy the Lie and Embrace the Truth message via public appearances, Twitter, and Facebook; and

    • Enlisting a wide range of other organizations and leaders in the Black community at the international, national, state, and local levels to take and promote the Pledge.

    About CHN--A 501c3 nonprofit organization, CHN is the creator and leader of the annual celebration of Community Healing Days (on the third weekend of every October, to put “time for healing” on the Black agenda) and the Community Healing Institute (designed to bring Black mental health professionals together to help local leaders establish and sustain self-help groups focused on emotional emancipation, healing, and wellness for Black people.) www.communityhealingnet.org

    About ABPsi--The Association of Black Psychologists is organized exclusively for charitable and educational purposes. As a 501c3 nonprofit organization, ABPsi seeks to promote and advance the profession of African psychology, influence and affect social change, and develop programs that address and work to alleviate problems of Black communities and other ethnic groups. www.abpsi.org

    (c) 2012 CHN Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. Defy the Lie and Embrace the Truth, Community Healing Days, Community Healing Institute, and related marks and logos are service marks owned by CHN. www.communityhealingnet.org

    Contact Information
    Tarice Gray
    818-907-5956
    chnhealing@gmail.com

    ooOoo


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