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    Help for Men Over 50 Coping with Enlarged Prostate - BPH - Advice from Dr. Dudley Danoff


    Enlarged Prostat


    I've just been diagnosed with an enlarged prostate. I've got BPH. What Should I Do Now?

    The National Institutes of Health reports that approximately 50 percent of men aged 51-60 and more than 90 percent of men older than 80 will develop BPH.

    Dr. Dudley Danoff has taught on the clinical faculty of the UCLA School of Medicine for more than twenty-five years and is the founder and president of the Cedars-Sinai Tower Urology Medical Group in Los Angeles. He says, Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or the benign enlargement of the prostate, is nearly inevitable in aging males.

    Think of the male bladder as a balloon placed neck-side down in the pelvis, and visualize the prostate as a doughnut around the neck of the balloon. As a man ages, the doughnut gets larger and the hole in the doughnut gets smaller, making it more difficult to empty the balloon through urination.

    Dr. Danoff says that the most reliable method of identifying which patients need treatment for BPH is a questionnaire developed by the American Urological Association (AUA) that examines the conditions most prominent symptoms, which include incomplete bladder emptying; frequency, intermittency, and urgency of urination; weakness of the urine stream; straining during urination; and nighttime urination. These symptoms are rated on a scale of 0 to 5. The higher the total score, the more likely it is that a patient will need treatment for BPH.

    If you get a BPH diagnosis, here are Dr. Danoff's top ten suggestions about what to do next:

    1. Have a complete urologic and prostate examination, which should include a digital rectal exam and a blood screening exam that uses a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to test for the presence of possible prostate cancer.

    2. Get a noninvasive ultrasound to measure the amount of urine remaining in the bladder after urination. An ultrasound can also detect structural abnormalities in the prostate and determine the need for a biopsy.

    3. Consider watchful waiting if symptoms are mild or moderate. Progression of symptoms is not inevitable, and some men's symptoms spontaneously improve or resolve.

    4. Ask about medical treatments for BPH. A recently developed class of drugs called alpha blockers has been widely and safely used for a number of years to relieve the symptoms of BPH. In general, they relax the neck of the bladder (widening the hole in the doughnut) to allow more complete emptying.

    5. Find out about shrinking the prostate. Another class of drugs called 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors affects the cells of the prostate, reducing the size of the gland and improving symptoms. This treatment usually takes six months and may cause side effects like erectile dysfunction, decreased libido, enlarged breast tissue, and ejaculation problems.

    6. Consider combination therapy. The combination of tamsulosin (an alpha blocker) and finasteride (a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor) has been shown to decrease AUA symptom scores and increase urinary flow rates significantly greater than the use of either drug alone. Over the last several years, combination therapy has vastly decreased the need for surgical intervention in the treatment of BPH.

    7. Learn about phytotherapy, a class of treatment using plants or plant extracts for medicinal purposes. The use of phytotherapy for BPH is popular in Europe, and enthusiasm for this treatment is growing in the United States. Although some studies have noted improvements in symptom scores and flow rates, others show no benefit beyond placebo, so use phytotherapy with caution.

    8. Consider a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) if symptoms are severe and other therapies have failed. To visualize what a TURP is, think of a plumber unclogging a pipe. Most TURP procedures use spinal anesthesia, require no incision and only a brief hospital stay, preserve continence and potency, and produce results superior to that of any other minimally invasive therapy. Possible complications include retrograde ejaculation (semen entering the bladder) and stricture (the formation of scar tissue).

    9. Research other minimally invasive procedures that open the urinary channel by destroying prostate tissue. Though not as effective as TURP, these procedures do not require an incision and may reduce complications. They include laser therapy, transurethral electrovaporization, hyperthermia, transurethral needle ablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and intraurethral stents.

    10. Most importantly, get an annual prostate examination after age 40. This is especially true if prostate cancer runs in your familyŃa man is 30 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer if a relative had the disease. Approximately one in seven men will develop prostate cancer in his lifetime, and 240,000 cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed this year in the United States alone.

    The options described above will help every patient with BPH symptoms make an intelligent treatment choice in consultation with his physician. The right treatment can dramatically improve a patientŐs quality of life with minimal side effects, and several minimally invasive treatment options can improve symptoms while preserving potency and continence.

    Dr, Danoff offered his view on the recent reports of a new treatment called prostatic artery embolization (PAE), that has shown some promise in easing the problem of frequent nighttime urination.

    The PAE procedure, Dr. Danoff says, are not very impressive since less than half of those who had this procedure reported improvement three months later, and only one parameter was measured: getting up at night to urinate. Using medication for this problem is more effective with minimal side effects. And the simple lifestyle change of drinking less fluid in the evening will attain the same result, without being subjected to having a catheter put into your femoral artery.

    The Ultimate Guide to Male Sexual Health How to Stay Vital at Any Age

    Enlarged Prostate

    Dudley Seth Danoff, MD

    List $15.95 also available in Kindle $6.99 Paperback 248 pages Publisher Del Monaco Press; Second edition July 15, 2015 ISBN-10: 0983199884 ISBN-13: 978-0983199885

    A meticulous examination of the essentials of male sexual health, arousal, and anatomy, this book provides nonjudgmental, practical, safe advice for banishing stress from the bedroom and making sex fun again. Written for men of all ages and their partners of either gender, this book explains the psychological and physical causes of PW (penis weakness) and provides a comprehensive look at the medical and nonmedical options for treating it. Whether you are looking to improve his genital health, last longer, or overcome PW-related issues like erectile dysfunction and impotence, this straightforward guide will help determine the fundamental causes of male problems using methods that fit all lifestyles and health profiles. A revolutionary guide to super potency, this book will give men the confidence and ability to perform sexually in any situation at any age.

    What People Are Saying

    "Finally an easy and practical approach to male sexuality. The Ultimate Guide to Male Sexual Health is the book that every man (and woman) will go to when questions arise about the performer and the act of the performance."
    --David Y. Josephson, MD, Program Director, Urologic Oncology and Robotic Surgery Fellowship, City of Hope National Medical Center

    "Dr. Danoff, a world-class urologist, has written a world-class book that should be read by every man and woman who enjoys sex."
    --Wolfgang Puck, restaurateur and world-famous chef, Spago

    "Dr. Danoff brings forward his deep knowledge and experience as a leading urologist in an educational and entertaining book that should address every question that most men utter only inside the confines of their doctors' exam rooms. I should tell you that their wives and girlfriends ask me the same questions, and this book is a great resource for them as well."
    --Sharron L. Mee, MD, Female Urologist

    "A must-read for all men who care about their physical and sexual health."
    -- Joe Weider, world-famous bodybuilder, fitness guru, and publisher of Men's Fitness

    "A stimulating and educational medical guide that will renew men's lives in the bedroom and keep them out of the operating room."
    -- Stuart Holden, MD, Medical Director, Prostate Cancer Foundation

    Simply the most empowering book of the millenniuma mastery of storytelling.
    Christopher S. Ng, MD, Chief, Division of Urology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    At last it is great to see a volume that produces such a constant flow of information. The information fills nearly every void on the subject and finally exposes the long and short of it.
    Johnny Mathis

    About the Author
    Dudley Seth Danoff, MD, FACS, is a diplomat of the American Board of Urology and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, with a medical degree from Yale University and urologic surgical training and fellowship from Columbia University-Presbyterian Medical Center. He is a former member of the clinical faculty at the University of California-Los Angeles School of Medicine, the founder and president of the Cedars-Sinai Tower Urology Medical Group. He is the author of Penis Power, Superpotency and The Ultimate Guide to Male Sexual Health. He lives in Beverly Hills, California.


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents.

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    Say No to Stress and Yes to a Better Life (or to Better Sex)


    Men in today's business world work long hours without enough sleep, exercise, or relaxation. They are often psychologically drained and physically exhausted when they get home. Add financial anxiety; societal pressure; nervousness caused by the rapid-fire pace of modern life; traffic jams; conflicts with bosses, coworkers, or clients; and problems with spouses and children, and one can see conditions are not conducive to maximum happiness.

    These everyday stressors can interfere with all aspects of your life, including sex. Few issues have a more chilling effect on sex than stress, tension, and anxiety. These forces exact a heavy toll on an intimate relationship, polluting the atmosphere and filling the bedroom with emotional toxins.


    Dr. Danoff

    Cultural or personal ideals and expectations for perfect relationships and perfectly proportioned bodies can further compound the stress. Millions of relationships turn into no-win situations when people aim for some imaginary standard of satisfaction. From my clinical observations, the single biggest sexual worry of contemporary men is that they will not provide their partners with orgasms of spectacular quantity and quality.

    Stress has definite medical consequences that work against normal sexual function. During the stress response, blood moves away from the genitals to supply the large muscle groups of arms and legs. Anxiety, including performance anxiety, can increase the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Anxiety can boost the flow of norepinephrine, a chemical that constricts blood vessels. This condition is precisely the opposite of what is necessary for an erection—a smooth flow of blood through open vascular channels.

    To have a happy and healthy—and sexy—life, you must say no to the stress and learn how to relax. Here are some simple ways you can reduce the stress level in your life:

    • Get plenty of rest. Happy and healthy men tend to live balanced lives. They are energetic, busy, and productive, but they are not workaholics. They do work hard, but they also work intelligently and efficiently. And they know when and how to relax. Their capacity for fun is as big as their capacity for work.

    • Don’t compare yourself to other men. It can be tempting to see images of sleek, muscular bodies with gorgeous women at their sides and feel that you don’t measure up. Striving for an unrealistic, ideal body type or relationship can damage your mental health. Avoid the unnecessary stress that comes from comparing yourself and focus instead on being comfortable in your own skin.

    • Have sex. If you are feeling anxious or worried, if you need to steer your mind away from burdensome thoughts and work off some tension, then having sex is the best antidote. Vigorous sex increases the volume of oxygen in your lungs, quickens your heart rate, and raises your effective circulating blood volume, all of which benefit your general health.

    • Keep stress out of the bedroom. Eliminating stressful situations altogether might be impossible, but that doesn’t mean you have to let outside stress impact your personal life. Develop the capacity to prevent negative emotions from impeding your ability to achieve an erection. If you start to feel anxious, turn that feeling into positive energy. You can convert that edginess into stimulation and become even more aroused.

    Reducing stress and learning to relax is essential to maintaining good mental health and physical health. Numerous studies have shown that people who undergo major traumas, such as the loss of a loved one or an accident, are much more likely to experience a serious illness. I have seen many patients suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome, and I can tell you that their sex life can also be affected.

    With some patients, however, even serious traumas do not seem to have a devastating effect. These individuals appear to deal with a crisis in a healthy, effective way. When the crisis resolves, they put it behind them, and their stressful encounter fades quickly from their minds.

    If you do not learn to deal with life’s difficulties in a positive way, traumas large and small will pollute all aspects of your life, especially your sexuality. It takes strength, confidence, and self-awareness to say no to stress, but your life—and your sex life—will be better for it.

    Dudley Seth Danoff, MD, FACS, is president and founder of the Cedars-Sinai Tower Urology Medical Group in Los Angeles, a Diplomate of the American Board of Urology, a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, and the author of two books on men's health.


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    Not All Fun and Games: How Drugs and Alcohol Can Ruin Your Sex Life


    The drugging of American men is a major factor in the decline of male sexual health. Some drugs create the illusion of enhanced sexuality because they seem to take the edge off, calm you down, lower inhibitions, and produce a heightened sensitivity—but that’s all it is, an illusion.

    In reality, drug and alcohol abuse and addiction can cause everything from temporary erectile dysfunction to long-term impotence. To paraphrase one of Shakespeare’s wisest observations: drugs might add to desire, but they just as equally take away from performance. Before you turn to alcohol or other intoxicants to aid your sex life or for any other reason, consider the following:

    1. Alcohol Impairs Erections and Reduces Pleasure
    We all know the routine. You have a few drinks, and everything from your tongue to your toes loosens up. Wallflowers start to dance, the tongue-tied become verbose, and the sexually repressed become Lotharios. If the object of your attention has also been drinking, suddenly anything and everything becomes possible. Alcohol has become as much a part of lovemaking for some people as soft lights. There is nothing dangerous about moderate, judicious drinking. But overdoing it makes it difficult to become aroused, delays ejaculation, reduces the pleasure and intensity of orgasms, and greatly diminishes firmness of erection. Nearly 50 percent of the chronic alcoholics I have counseled experience either total or partial impotence. The short-term effects appear to be based on alcohol’s sedative action on the central nervous system. The long-term effects include severe nerve damage that can diminish sensitivity and permanently impair the ability to get an erection.

    2. Marijuana Reduces Energy and Motivation
    Many patients have told me that marijuana enhances their potency. Some studies have indicated that marijuana can, in fact, slow the ejaculatory process. In other words, an erection can be maintained for a longer period of time before orgasm. For a younger man who might be quick on the trigger, this can be perceived as “enhanced” potency. I must recommend extreme caution about jumping to the conclusion that marijuana is an aphrodisiac. Since marijuana is a mind-altering substance, its effect on sexuality is most likely illusory. Research shows that the negative effects of marijuana are similar to those of alcohol. There is good evidence that long-term marijuana smoking weakens overall fitness and reduces energy and motivation.

    3. Cocaine Leads to Long-Term Erection Failure
    When Cole Porter wrote that he doesn’t get a kick from cocaine he might not have been thinking about sex. But the message applies: where men’s sexuality is concerned, cocaine is certainly no kick. In the short term, cocaine has an excitatory effect on the nervous system. It can stimulate arousal and make every sensory experience seem more intense. In the long run, though, cocaine will turn a superpotent man into a super-wimp. Pharmacologically, cocaine decreases the reuptake of the neurotransmitter catecholamine. This chemical is essential for an adequate erection. Failure to get and maintain erections is a common complaint from cocaine abusers.

    4. Amphetamines, Pain Killers, and Other Drugs Reduce Libido
    As for other illicit drugs, no man should ever use them. Regarding amphetamines, let me remind you of the 1960s poster: “Speed kills!” It certainly kills libido, ejaculatory function, and erections. Its long-term sexual impact is devastating. This is also true for drugs in the narcotic family such as heroin, codeine, Demerol, and pain killers (Vicodin, Valium, Oxycotin, etc.). Users of these drugs experience a drastic reduction in libido, as well as chronic difficulty with erections.

    5. Cigarette Smoking Has Been Linked to Impotence
    One more drug must be mentioned—nicotine. As if there were not enough reasons to stop smoking, or never start, consider this: several studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking is more prevalent among impotent men. In another study, animals exposed to tobacco smoke or intravenous nicotine were unable to produce or maintain erections. There is a simple scientific reason for this. Nicotine constricts blood vessels. When you smoke, the supply of arterial blood is reduced, making it more difficult to get a firm erection. Simply put, smoking is as bad for your sex life as it is for your lungs.

    While some of the above-mentioned substances should be avoided for their illicit status alone, even legal substances—like alcohol, cigarettes, and prescription medicines—can become enemies of your sex life if you abuse them. Rather than turning to intoxicants when you need a rush, why not try something more natural? Sex can help you moderate potentially dangerous habits. When you are sexually satisfied, you feel so good about yourself that you are less likely to abuse drugs, alcohol, or other substances.

    Dudley Seth Danoff, MD, FACS, is president and founder of the Cedars-Sinai Tower Urology Group in Los Angeles, a Diplomate of the American Board of Urology, a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, and the author of two books on men’s health.


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    Six Things For Men To Do With And Without Their Doctor In The New Year


    Men are notoriously bad at taking care of themselves. They often need a nudge from their spouse, partner, or doctor to keep them healthy.

    Dudley Seth Danoff, MD, FACS, men’s urologist and expert for more than thirty years, says that men have a tendency to ignore health issues and hope they go away on their own.

    Of course, this doesn’t happen. And Dr. Danoff is known for his candid and good-natured style that makes it easier for men (and the partners in their lives) to talk about and handle a myriad of medical situations.

    An author and requested guest on national radio and television shows, Dr. Danoff is a graduate of Princeton University and Yale University Medical School. He has taught on the clinical faculty of the UCLA School of Medicine for more than twenty-five years and is the founder and president of the prestigious Cedars-Sinai Tower Urology Medical Group in Los Angeles. Urologist to many Hollywood stars and the recipient of national and international honors, Dr. Danoff is also senior attending urologist at the Saban Community Clinic in Los Angeles.

    1. Reduce Stress and Learn to Relax
    Men in today’s business world work long hours without enough sleep, exercise, or relaxation. They are often psychologically drained and physically exhausted when they get home. If you are feeling anxious or worried, then having sex is the best antidote. Vigorous sex increases the volume of oxygen in your lungs, quickens your heart rate, and raises your effective circulating blood volume, all of which benefit your general health.

    2. Pay Attention to What You Eat
    A diet low in saturated fat and high in fiber is very effective in helping men maintain their sexual prowess. A great sex life depends on clean arteries—so don’t gum up the works by ingesting saturated fats and bad cholesterol. Wining and dining can be romantic, but too much dining will leave you sluggish, heavy, and tired. Reliable evidence supports a low-fat, high-fiber, and high-protein diet, in addition to regular exercise, as part of an overall regimen to keep your prostate healthy.

    3. Moderate Your Intake of Alcohol (and Other Intoxicants)
    The drugging of American men—including the use of alcohol, nicotine, and prescription medications—is a major factor in the decline of male sexual health. Drug and alcohol abuse and addiction can cause everything from temporary erectile dysfunction to long-term impotence. There is nothing dangerous about moderate, judicious drinking. But overdoing it with alcohol or illicit substances makes it more difficult for a man to become aroused. Overindulgence delays ejaculation, reduces the pleasure and intensity of orgasms, and greatly diminishes the firmness of erections.

    4. Get a PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) Blood Test
    The PSA blood test is the male equivalent of the Pap smear and mammogram in women. This is a routine, painless way to potentially detect cancer in time to treat it effectively. A PSA test is recommended as part of a routine annual screening for men over forty-five. Published data has shown that screening using the PSA in conjunction with a standard, digital rectal examination doubles the detection rate of early prostate cancer.

    5. Consider Serum Testosterone Blood Screening
    Progressive testosterone deficiency in aging men can lead to osteoporosis, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, mood changes (the “grumpy old man syndrome”), and the dreaded middle-age paunch. Men who are experiencing some of these symptoms should ask their physician about serum testosterone blood screening, which allows a physician to determine if a patient needs testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). If a man’s serum testosterone is below 200 ng/dl (nanograms per deciliter), TRT is recommended.

    6. Ask Your Doctor about Cystoscopy
    More than half of all men over the age of fifty develop a frustrating and sometimes painful condition known as benign enlargement of the prostate, or benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH). BPH causes discomfort, incomplete bladder emptying, frequent urination (particularly at night), and a weak urinary flow. Cystoscopy allows doctors to examine the entire length of the urethra, the prostate, and the bladder; check for tumors, polyps, stones, and other causes of irritation; and assess the degree of prostatic obstruction. This procedure is relatively painless and can be done in the office in about thirty seconds.


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents.

    No Implied Endorsement:
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    FOUR REASONS YOU SHOULD HAVE A PSA (PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING BLOOD TEST)


    A virtual firestorm has erupted with the publication of the US Preventive Services Task Force draft recommendation that healthy men should no longer receive a PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood test to screen for prostate cancer because “the test does not save lives

    Dr. Danoff


    overall and often leads to more tests and treatments that needlessly cause pain, impotence, and incontinence,” according to a recent NY Times article.

    It is well known that the PSA blood test is an imperfect test. However, it is the best one that we have available for early detection of prostate cancer at a stage that is curable, particularly in men ages 45 to 65. This test should not be rejected out of hand because we do not have anything to take its place.

    The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), the world’s leading philanthropic funder of prostate cancer research, was founded in 1993 and has raised more than $475 million. It provides funding to more than 1,500 researchers at nearly 200 institutions in 12 countries. PCF advocates for greater awareness of the need for prostate cancer research and greater patient participation in research. In response to the task force’s stance against PSA screening, PCF has made some specific recommendations, which include the following:

    1. PSA routine screening should be continued, after the patient is informed of its limitations, until the American Urologic Association clinical guidelines on PSA screening are issued and disseminated. PSA screening is not treatment.

    2. The decision to have a PSA test or not should be made between a man and his personal physician based on the man’s age, symptoms, family history, and concerns about prostate cancer.

    3. The process of informed patient decision making both prior to and after PSA screening in healthy men should be encouraged.

    4. Research should be intensified by the National Cancer Institute with a focus on better early detection tests for lethal prostate cancers.

    Hopefully, these recommendations will encourage new public-private research partnerships between the American Cancer Society, the American Urologic Association, the National Cancer Institute, and the Prostate Cancer Foundation. These types of public-private partnerships have the potential to accelerate the discovery, testing, and validation of new biotechnologies for lethal-cancer detection that are superior to PSA screening. Until a new test is developed, however, prostate cancer screening is best served with the continued utilization of the PSA blood test.

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force report has clearly created a heightened awareness regarding the shortcomings of the PSA test. Certainly, the one positive result would be to encourage the development of a more precise prostate cancer screening blood test. Until that day, the baby should not be thrown out with the bath water. It should not be forgotten that in the pre-PSA era, approximately 80 percent of the patients who were diagnosed with prostate cancer were already in advanced stages of the disease with metastases.

    Today, the number of patients who are diagnosed with metastatic disease at the time of initial diagnosis is about 20 percent. Finally, in the past 15 years (the PSA era), the death rate has been reduced from approximately 40,000 men annually to 30,000 men annually in the United States. Screening is the best way to ensure that these trends continue.

    Dudley Seth Danoff, MD, FACS, is president and founder of the Cedars-Sinai Tower Urology Medical Group in Los Angeles, a Diplomate of the American Board of Urology, a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, and the author of two books on men's health.

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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    Movember


    Today is the official start of Movember, the month-long initiative where men grow mustaches to raise awareness for men’s health issues.

    Sign up to be part of Team Gillette this Movember. By joining #TeamGillette, guys will be part of an all-star team of Movember supporters, including Team Captain and ultimate Mo Sista Kate Upton, NFL stars Clay Matthews, Victor Cruz and Danny Amendola, New England Revolution defender Kevin Alston and many more. Guys can join Team Gillette at http://moteam.co/team-gillette. To up the ante and provide encouragement for anyone growing a Mo this year, Gillette will donate $100 to the Mo Space pages of the first 250 men and women who sign up on Team Gillette.

    As part of the team, men and women across the country can have the best Movember experience ever and keep Mo’s looking stylish with the Gillette Fusion ProGlide Styler.

      Kate Upton - Movember

     Movember


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents.

    No Implied Endorsement:
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    Anti-Aging and You: A Guide to Healthy Living


    As a man, one is not necessarily destined to have prostate problems - as some men in their 80s have no symptoms- whatsoever. However, the majority of men do go on to develop some kind of prostate disease.

    Health expert, Stephan Karian
    Most prostate problems fall in these three categories:

    1. Prostatitis is an inflammation of the prostate gland. It is more common in younger men and is often, but not always, caused by a bacterial infection. It can be very uncomfortable, but it is not life-threatening.

    2. Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH) is a non-cancerous growth of the prostate gland. BPH can cause discomfort and may interfere with urination and sexual function.

    3. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in men (lung cancer is #1). Unlike BPH, cancer is the result of abnormal and uncontrollable growth. Fortunately, most prostate cancers are not very aggressive, which is why only a fraction of patients die from this disease.

    Because of the location of the prostate gland, most symptoms are either urinary or sexual in nature. Below is a description of some of the symptoms associated with an enlarged prostate:

    • Frequent urination
    • Having to wait before urination starts
    • Decreased force and strength of the urine stream
    • Having a sensation that the bladder is not empty even after you finished urinating
    • A feeling that you cannot hold the urine and must go NOW!
    • Pain or burning sensation while urinating
    • Dribbling after the end of urination
    • Blood in the urine
    • Tenderness/pain in the pelvic area
    • Pain or swelling of the testicles
    • Urinating at night
    • Inability to urinate
    • Painfull ejaculation
    • Reduced libido
    • Erectile dysfunction

    Uncontrollable Factors (RISK) include: Age, Ethnic Background, Family History. While controllable factors include: Environment, Diet, Nutritional Supplements, Diagnosing Prostate Problems, Digital Rectal Exam, Urine Test, Blood Test, Ultrasound, Prostate Biopsy.

    http://www.stephankarian.com/

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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    Blue September


    - a critically acclaimed international campaign developed to increase awareness of prostate cancer, is asking for your help in promoting better health for men during the final week of the 2012 campaign. -

    Husband, father, son or friend – someone you know in your lifetime will get prostate cancer. In fact, African American men are at a significantly higher risk of developing prostate cancer than white men. Among black men, 19 percent — nearly one in five — will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and five percent of those will die from this disease. Prostate cancer is the fourth most common reason overall for death in African-American men.

    Blue September (www.blueseptember.org), a critically acclaimed international campaign developed to increase awareness of prostate cancer, is asking for your help in promoting better health for men during the final week of the 2012 campaign. The campaign encourages early detection and support of those being diagnosed and treated for the disease. Many men are afraid of the examination and testing which lead to late diagnosis and treatment.

    black men's health
    Funny man, Donald Faison, from the comedy series Scrubs, put his popularity to good use by supporting the campaign. Faison said, “I will be affected in some way in my life by prostate cancer, whether it is me, a brother, or a friend – it is bound to happen. Everyone around the age of 40 should have a conversation with their doctor about their prostate and get it checked…"

    The good news is that many deaths from prostate cancer can be prevented by early detection. Here are some things men can do during the month to support Blue September:

    Eat right (including walnuts) and exercise.

    Know your family history and share it with family members.

    Do your research; be an active member on your healthcare team.

    If you are over 40 years-old, find a physician you trust and talk to them about developing a proactive prostate care plan.

    Talk to your peers and friends; make prostate cancer something to talk about.

    If you are given a diagnosis of prostate cancer, do not panic—detected early, it is highly treatable. Even in cases of advanced disease, there are more effective treatment options than ever before.

    Joining the California Blue September team as sponsors this year are California Walnuts, Varian Medical Systems, 91X Radio and Men’s Health magazine.For more information or to participate in a Blue September event, visit www.blueSeptember.org. Follow on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/USABlueSeptember and on twitter @BlueSeptemberUS.

    ooOoo


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BLACK / AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN'S HEALTH
   

  1. African American Men's Health Summit ...
    Official AAMHS website.
    http://blackmenshealthsummit.com/

  2. African-Americans With Prostate Cancer ...
    African-American men with prostate cancer were more likely to report a family history of prostate cancer and breast cancer among siblings than men who did not have prostate cancer.
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=58069

  3. Black American Men's Health ...
    Black American men suffer far worse health than any other racial group in America.
    http://menshealth.about.com/od/blackhealth/a/Af_amer_stats.htm

  4. Black Men's Health ...
    Health statistics show the differences of the health of blacks in America. Men's Health looks at the reasons of disadvantaged health outcomes.
    http://menshealth.about.com/od/blackhealth/Black_Mens_Health.htm

  5. Black Men's Health ...
    Black Men's Health webring was created for sites that strickly cover issues on health and nutrition.
    http://o.webring.com/hub?ring=blackmenshealth

  6. Father's World ...
    African American Men's Health.
    http://www.fathersworld.com/mh_week/factafam.html

  7. Getting Started : The Black Woman's Guide to Black Men's Health ...
    Black women have always been the backbone of their families and communities. Now studies are showing what we have always known-that our love, support, and guidance help to improve the health of our black men.
    http://www.enotalone.com/article/11799.html

  8. Global Wellness Project ...
    We produce educational and engaging films, television programming, and new media designed to promote preventive healthcare and wellness in the minority community.
    http://www.globalwellnessproject.org/h/

  9. Jeanne Elizabeth Blum ...
    Author of "Woman Heal Thyself" A book based on ancient Chinese acupressure techniques. Also information for men with prostate cancer.
    http://www.womanhealthyself.com/

  10. JourneyForControl.com ...
    What is type 2 diabetes? Find the answer and more at the Journey for Control Web site.
    http://www.journeyforcontrol.com/

  11. MedlinePlus ...
    MedlinePlus: African-American Health.
    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/africanamericanhealth.htm

  12. Men's Health ...
    While African American men are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease, they paradoxically have fewer cases of coronary obstruction than clinically similar white men.
    http://www.emaxhealth.com/3/5696.htm

  13. Menshealth Consulting | African American Men's Health ...
    Men's Health Consulting is an educational and training firm that promotes better health in men by offering a variety of services designed to understand and change the attitudes and behaviors that influence men's health.
    http://www.menshealth.org/code/afroamer.html

  14. Men's ‘Silent Health Crisis' ...
    Men's ‘Silent Health Crisis' Cries Out for Men's Health Act.
    http://www.glennsacks.com/mens_silent_health.htm

  15. NBMHN ...
    National Black Men's Health Network. A group of community-conscious individuals that have formed an organization to help educate the community and promote public awareness of the special health needs of the Black male individual.
    http://www.nbmhn.net/

  16. PSA Rising ...
    A study by University of Michigan Health System researchers found the gene macrophage scavenger receptor 1 plays a role in prostate cancer in African-Americans.
    http://psa-rising.com/med/african-am/umichigan_gene_72003.shtml

  17. The Silent Killer: Prostate Cancer "The DVD" ...
    You have questions, you need to watch the documentary. You need answers, you need to watch the documentary. You need information about making good health choices, you need to watch "The Silent Killer: Prostate Cancer"
    http://www.prostatecaretoday.com/

  18. WIN - Publication - Improving Your Health ...
    Change your physical activity and eating habits. When you make changes to improve your health, you may also move your friends and family to do the same.
    http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/improving.htm

  19. 6th Annual African-American Men's Health Forum ...
    ulie Wills, Executive Director of The Florida Prostate Cancer Network (FPCN) and Dr James Brookins, President Community Health Advocacy Partnership (CHAP).
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=18597
















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