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BLACK HOLOCAUST AND SLAVERY MUSEUM ( PHILADELPHIA 2015 )
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MY VISIT TO NATIONAL BLACKS IN WAX MUSEUM BALTIMORE MD
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Conversating While Black | "Museums: Killers of Art?" 106
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    SMITHSONIAN CHANNEL™ PARTNERS WITH THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE FOR HISTORIC OPENING

    - Smithsonian Channel Produces 130 Videos To Be Displayed Throughout New Museum -


    NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


    NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 15, 2016 - On September 24, 2016, the Smithsonian will open the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history and culture. The opening will welcome President Barack Obama and some of the biggest influencers in politics and Hollywood

    Smithsonian Channel has partnered with the National Museum of African American History and Culture to produce 130 videos for the inaugural exhibits. The videos, comprised of 450 minutes of footage with an estimated 8,000 images, will be displayed on monitors ranging in size from 22 inches to a massive 186-foot overhead screen.

    "For Smithsonian Channel, this collaboration was a unique opportunity to bring the best of our resources and talent to support the mission of the National Museum of African American History and Culture," said Tom Hayden, President of Smithsonian Channel. "It also reinforces the Channel's commitment to quality documentary storytelling, which includes the very important topic of race in America."

    From the Revolutionary War to recent viral moments on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, each video is a snapshot of some of the most memorable and significant moments in African American history. The Channel's massive production effort unearthed hundreds of hours of footage and tens of thousands of photographs. The resulting videos include rare and unique images that span centuries, ranging from iconic moments and unsung heroes to current pop culture conversations and hot topic issues. The effort was global, as befits a story with international scope that dates from the late 1400s to present day.

    Also included are videos narrated by musical icons, interviews with hip hop pioneers, and insights from some of the most influential people in sports and pop culture.

    Smithsonian Channel™, owned by Smithsonian Networks™, a joint venture between Showtime Networks Inc. and the Smithsonian Institution, is where curiosity lives, inspiration strikes and wonders never cease. This is the place for awe-inspiring stories, powerful documentaries and amazing entertainment across multiple platforms. Smithsonian Channel combines the storytelling prowess of SHOWTIME® with the unmatched resources and rich traditions of the Smithsonian, to create award-winning programming that shines new light on popular genres such as air and space, history, science, nature, and pop culture. Among the network’s offerings are series including Aerial America, Million Dollar American Princesses, The Weapon Hunter, Mighty Ships, Mighty Planes and Air Disasters, as well as critically-acclaimed specials that include Civil War 360, 9/11: The Heartland Tapes; MLK: The Assassination Tapes and The Day Kennedy Died. Smithsonian Networks also operates Smithsonian Earth™, through SN Digital LLC., a new subscription video streaming service delivering spectacular original nature and wildlife content. To learn more, go to www.smithsonianchannel.com, or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

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    The Hammer Museum Presents In Real Life, 100 Days of Film and Performance September 13, 2016-January 25, 2017



    (Los Angeles, CA)—This fall the Hammer Museum will present In Real Life, an ambitious program of daytime performances and film screenings animating the museum’s courtyard, annex, and Billy Wilder Theater while the upstairs galleries are undergoing renovations. Exploring wide-ranging issues, themes and practices, In Real Life is organized into three strands: four curated film and video series; weekend performances by artists such as Simon Leung, Lara Schnitger, and Trajal Harrell in addition to durational and immersive works by Mutant Salon (Young Joon Kwak and Marvin Astorga) and Women’s Center for Creative Work; and courtyard rehearsals of works-in-progress by a select group of performers in disciplines including theater, dance, music, and experimental recitation.

    The program was conceived of to bring forth varied, but complementary, curatorial points of view. “In Real Life gives the entire Hammer curatorial team a chance to explore their areas of interest within film and performance,” remarked Hammer Director Ann Philbin. “We’re excited for the daytime activation of our courtyard, public spaces, and theater during the fall renovation of our third-floor galleries.”

    In Real Life: Film and Video will include four thematic film and video series over the course of the fall and is organized in collaboration with local and international artists, independent curators and arts organizations. In Real Life: Performance showcases new and restaged works by a variety of artists and performers over 15 weekends. In Real Life: Studio provides a glimpse into the working processes of artists. A select group of artists will utilize spaces in the museum to convene and rehearse new material, including theater, dance, music, and performance, and while some artists and collectives will simply discuss or workshop material, others will produce a new project from rehearsal to final performance. In Real Life programming will complement the Hammer’s full schedule of fall public programs. For details about the lineup see hammer.ucla.edu.

    Film and Video
    Four thematic film and video programs will screen over the course of the fall and are organized in collaboration with local and international artists, independent curators, and arts organizations.

    All films are shown Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.

    Artists’ Film International
    September 13-October 15, 2016
    Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, noon-4 p.m

    Artists’ Film International is a collaboration between sixteen international museums initiated by the Whitechapel Gallery in London. Every year, each institution proposes one film, video, or animation on a common theme for screening in all of the partner venues over the course of the year. The Hammer Museum will screen seven films from the 2015 and 2016 collections, which examined crisis and technology respectively. The Hammer will add to the video selection in 2017. Film showings to include selections from Artists’ Film International 2015 and 2016:

    Brigid McCaffrey, Paradise Springs, 2013 (28:58)
    Pietr Wysocki and Dominik Jalowinski, Run Free, 2011 (22:00)
    Diego Tonus, Speculative Speeches (Workers of the World-Relax), 2012 (14:59)
    Rachel Maclean, Germs, 2013 (3:00)
    The Institute for New Feeling, This Is Presence, 2016 (17:19)
    Zeyno Pekunlu, How to Properly Touch a Girl so You Don’t Creep Her Out, 2015 (19:10)
    Eva and Franco Mattes, Dark Content, 2015 (15:00)


    The Hammer’s presentation of Artists’ Film International is organized by Emily Gonzalez-Jarrett, curatorial associate.

    Ecco: The Videos of Oneohtrix Point Never and Related Works
    October 18–November 19, 2016
    Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, noon-4 p.m

    Organized around the work of Oneohtrix Point Never—the recording alias of electronic musician, composer, and producer Daniel Lopatin—this program includes a selection of self-produced music videos alongside collaborations with artists John Michael Boling, Nate Boyce, Takeshi Murata, and Jon Rafman. Rooted in early video effects and the history of experimental cinema, the visual and musical output surrounding Oneohtrix Point Never takes the form of complex assemblages of sound and image that are developed in equal measure.

    Organized by Aram Moshayedi, curator, with MacKenzie Stevens, curatorial assistant.

    How to Love a Watermelon Woman
    November 22–30, 2016 and December 20–31, 2016
    Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, noon-4 p.m

    How to Love a Watermelon Woman is a film program that highlights the work of queer filmmaker Cheryl Dunye and celebrates the 20th anniversary of her seminal film, The Watermelon Woman (1996), which follows the lead character Cheryl, a young black lesbian trying to make a film about an obscure actress who played stereotypical “mammy” roles in the 1930s. Dunye is a 2016 recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim fellowship and was recently invited to join the Academy of Motion Pictures.

    Organized by Erin Christovale, independent curator.

    The Workshop Years: Black British Film and Video Collectives after 1981
    January 3–25, 2017
    Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, noon-4 p.m

    Independent black British filmmaking saw an increased urgency and viability in the aftermath of South London’s Brixton Rising in 1981. Through new avenues of institutional support and the formation of “publisher-broadcaster” stations like Channel 4, filmmaking collectives and workshops such as Black Audio Film Collective, Sankofa Film and Video Collective, and Ceddo Film and Video Workshop emerged in the early part of the decade as alternatives to the dominant modes of representation in the U.K. This program revisits the history of black independent film and video in 1980s-era Britain and the means of by which filmmakers addressed the exclusions of race from mainstream media production while negotiating a newfound race-relations industry.

    Organized by Aram Moshayedi, curator, with MacKenzie Stevens, curatorial assistant.

    Performance
    In Real Life: Performance showcases new and restaged works by a variety of artists and performers taking place most weekends.

    Programs for In Real Life: Performance are organized by January Parkos Arnall, curatorial associate, Public Engagement; Connie Butler, chief curator; Leslie Cozzi, curatorial associate; Anne Ellegood, senior curator; Emily Gonzalez-Jarrett, curatorial associate; Aram Moshayedi, curator; MacKenzie Stevens, curatorial assistant; and Ali Subotnick, curator.

    Halau Hula O Na Mele 'Aina O Hawai’i with Ei Arakawa and Silke Otto-Knapp
    Saturday, September 17, 2016, hula workshop 11 a.m., performances 2 p.m. & 4 p.m.

    The New York–based Hawaiian dance group Halau Hula O Na Mele ‘Aina O Hawai’i, led by the native Hawaiian choreographer Luana Haraguchi, will perform traditional hula kahiko with the artist Ei Arakawa. The performances take place in the museum’s lobby and are set against the backdrop of Seascape (with moon), 2016, a large-scale painting by Silke Otto-Knapp installed on the Hammer’s Lobby Wall.

    At the Edge of Space and Time: Expanding Beyond Our 4% Universe
    Saturday & Sunday, October 1 & 2, 2016, 1 p.m.

    In the tradition of planetary light shows, collaborators Jennifer Moon and laub will bring viewers on an adventure through the cosmos, the multiverse, and beyond, presenting ideas about love, faith, and revolution by queering various scientific disciplines.

    Gabie Strong
    Saturday, October 1, 2016, 1 p.m.

    Los Angeles-based artist and musician Gabie Strong’s improvisational performance explores spatial constructions of degeneration, drone, and decay.

    Dynasty Handbag in I, An Moron
    Sunday, October 2, 2016, 3 p.m.

    Jibz Cameron’s outlandish performance alter ego Dynasty Handbag is featured in this falling-apart, falling- down stand-up show that covers topics including the fact that everyone she knows is having a baby and how this makes her feel enraged and scared/inadequate, the future memory of the time when she got her Netflix special, and a cover of Rihanna’s well-known blue collar anthem celebrating the proletariat. With live musical accompaniment by Taylor the Sax Bottom.

    Get a Room
    Saturday & Sunday, October 15 & 16, 2016, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

    Get a Room will feature a variety of comedic programs and talents including stand-up acts, screenings, and more. This event is co-organized with Meg Cranston, a visual artist who also performs stand up.

    Drawing Lessons from the SKZ
    Saturday, October 22, 2016, 1-4 p.m.

    Los Angeles–based artist Dan Levenson’s practice centers on the State Art Academy Zurich (SKZ), a Swiss modernist art school of his own invention. In this performance, Levenson leads a three-hour class that will consist of a lecture, drawing exercises, and crits following the curriculum of the SKZ.

    Mutant Salon
    Saturday & Sunday, October 29 & 30, 2016, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

    Mutant Salon is a beauty salon and a platform for collaborative performance—born of LGBTQ POC, women, and mutants— that unravels culturally embedded ideas of beauty and celebrates an ethos of transformation in the act of self-care. Along with salon services, the installation in the Hammer courtyard and adjacent spaces embodies a spirit of engagement through an interactive environment and performances from the Mutant Salon community.

    Lightning Shadow: Caddy! Caddy! Caddy! William Faulkner Dance Project
    Saturday & Sunday, November 5 & 6, 2016, 3-5 p.m.

    The Venice-based performance group Lightning Shadow reconstructs Caddy! Caddy! Caddy!, a piece inspired by Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!, The Sound and the Fury, and A Rose for Emily. Oguri, a butoh-trained dancer, performs alongside Roxanne Steinberg, Morleigh Steinberg, and other dancers within a site-specific environment designed by the artist Hirokazu Kosaka and to a sound score composed by Paul Chavez. Lightning Shadow will also populate the museum with installations throughout the day.

    Lara Schnitger: Suffragette City
    Saturday, November 12, 2016, noon-2 p.m.
    Sunday, November 13, 2016, noon-4 p.m.

    Following a tradition of artists’ street performance and protest marches, on Saturday artist Lara Schnitger presents Suffragette City, a procession of sculptures through Westwood that are comprised of images, forms, and texts explicitly addressing women’s rights. With public participation at its core, the procession is both playful and political, inspired by the history of feminist agitprop as well as increasingly imperative demands for equality and safety in light of recent events. On Sunday, Schnitger will present a selection of art and documentary films that focus on feminist speech and civil rights.

    Alison O’Daniel
    Saturday & Sunday, November 19 & 20, 2016, 1-4 p.m.

    Working in experimental and documentary film, performance, sculpture, and installation, Alison O’Daniel structures her work as a call-and-response between mediums and meanings. Her collaborations with composers and musicians often highlight the loss or re-creation of information as it passes through various channels, building a visual, aural, and haptic vocabulary as a means to tell stories inspired by events that are both historic and quotidian.

    Women’s Center for Creative Work: Thank You for this Community--A Dinner at the Hammer Saturday, November 26, 2016, 2-5 p.m.
    The Women’s Center for Creative Work (WCCW) acts as a hub in Los Angeles, facilitating interaction between feminists of all genders and the larger public through events and social engagement. The WCCW invites Hammer visitors to break bread in communion and friendship at a post-Thanksgiving supper examining ideas of locality, place making, and friendship in a convivial setting.

    SORORITY: THE WOODS and THE INTERNET
    Saturday & Sunday, December 3 & 4, 2016, 2-5 p m.

    A queer performance salon created and directed by the theater artist Gina Young, SORORITY presents works-in-progress, theatrical situations, readings, and experimental improvisations. Elapsing over two days, each presentation highlights a different field of inquiry and includes artists from a variety of genres, including Jasmine Nyende, Raquel Gutierrez, Amanda-Faye Jimenez, and Kristina Wong among others.

    Simon Leung: ACTIONS! / ADJUNCTS!
    Saturday & Sunday, December 10 & 11, 2016, 2-5 p.m.

    Originally presented in 2013 at The Kitchen in New York City, ACTIONS!, a contemporary form of “art workers’ theater” that revisits political and art “actions,” including a worker’s strike against the Museum of Modern Art in 2000, presented alongside ADJUNCTS!, a new work conceived as a dance/collective poem addressing current education and labor issues in L.A. art schools. ACTIONS!/ADJUNCTS! features participants from the original performance as well as students, graduates, and adjunct faculty from throughout the L.A. art community. A discussion with the participants follows Sunday’s performance.

    Recycled Languages: Workshop and Reading
    Lenguajes reciclados: Taller y lectura
    Saturday/Sabado, December/Diciembre 17, 2016
    workshop/taller, noon-2 p.m., reading/lectura, 3-4 p.m.

    Antena and Libros Antena Books (Los Angeles) present a cross-language event that will include a poetry reading featuring work written in languages other than English with and without translations, and an interactive cartonera book workshop with Cartonera Santanera (Santa Ana), Kaya Press (Los Angeles), Kodama Cartonera (Tijuana), and Tiny Splendor (Los Angeles). Cartonera bookmaking is a DIY art which invites active community participation in the process of making and publishing books using recycled materials. The workshop will be in Spanish and English; interpretation provided by Antena Los Ángeles.

    Antena y Libros Antena Books (Los Ángeles) presentan un evento intralingüístico que incluirá una lectura de poesía con enfoque en obra escrita en lenguajes que no sean el inglés con y sin traducciones, y un taller interactivo de libros cartoneros con Cartonera Santanera (Santa Ana), Kaya Press (Los Ángeles), Kodama Cartonera (Tijuana), y Tiny Splendor (Los Ángeles). La fabricación de libros cartoneros es un arte DIY (hazlo-tú-mismx) que invita a la participación comunitaria activa en el proceso de hacer y publicar libros usando materiales reciclados. El taller será en español e inglés; Antena Los Ángeles proporcionará la interpretación.

    Poetic Research Bureau
    Sunday, December 18, 2016, noon-5 p.m.

    The Poetic Research Bureau, a storefront library and experimental publishing collective, presents two reading series @SEA and Improvising the Mingus School. The first, @SEA moves beyond singlechannel readings of texts toward interdisciplinary programs that intermingle video and film projection, poetry readings, performance, and unconventional lectures. The second, Improvising the Mingus School, programmed by the poet and archivist Harmony Holiday, riffs on the concept of a Charles Mingus School of deep listening, screenings, and expansive talk—”an open, interdisciplinary workshop akin to Mingus’s own jazz workshop.”

    Simone Leigh
    Saturday & Sunday, January 7 & 8, 2017, 2-4 p.m.

    On the final weekend of her Hammer Project, Simone Leigh is joined by special guest, Rizvana Bradley (Yale University), for a performative lecture in the Hammer Courtyard. Simone Leigh and Rizvana Bradley will engage in an improvisational exchange about black radical political, literary, and artistic traditions. Inspired in part by the community outreach work of the Black Panther Party focused on self determination, Leigh’s recent work in social practice refers to historical instances where people, especially women of color, operated in secret in order to exchange knowledge, politically organize, and empower each other in the face of class and racial inequity.

    Trajal Harrell: Judson Church is Ringing in Harlem (Made-to-Measure)/Twenty Looks or Paris is Burning at The Judson Church
    Saturday & Sunday, January 14 & 15, 2017, 3-4 p.m.

    (M2M) is a customizable version of the New York–based artist Trajal Harrell’s renowned Twenty Looks or Paris Is Burning at the Judson Church series. In (M2M), Harrell makes a work for three dancers that engages the formalism and minimalism of postmodern dance, especially from the Judson Church period, with the flamboyancy and performativity of voguing.

    At night the states
    Saturday & Sunday, January 21 & 22, 2017, noon-4 p.m.

    At night the states is a series of conversations and performances organized by guest curators Shoghig Halajian and Suzy Halajian. The series explores the different kinship structures one inhabits and passes through on a daily basis and how these sites shape and shift personal and political allegiances.

    Studio
    In Real Life: Studio provides a glimpse into the working processes of artists. Throughout the fall a select group of artists utilize a courtyard stage to convene and rehearse new material, including theater, dance, music, and performance. While some artists and collectives will simply discuss or workshop material, others will produce a new project from rehearsal to final performance.

    In Real Life: Studio is a Public Engagement project organized by January Parkos Arnall, curatorial associate, Public Engagement.

    Breath Sessions
    Thursday, October 20, 2016, 6 p.m.
    Thursday, October 27, 2016, 6 p.m.

    As part of New York-based interdisciplinary artist Jeanine Oleson’s fall residency at the Hammer, she and collaborators will rehearse for a new work involving a specially commissioned hand-blown glass “breath-lung” antechamber for a wind instrument.

    ABOUT THE HAMMER MUSEUM
    The Hammer Museum at UCLA offers collections, exhibitions, and programs that span the classic to the contemporary in art, architecture, and design. The Hammer’s international exhibition program focuses on wideranging thematic and monographic exhibitions, highlighting contemporary art since the 1960s and the work of emerging artists through Hammer Projects and the Hammer’s biennial, Made in L.A. As a cultural center, the Hammer Museum offers nearly 300 free public programs a year, including lectures, readings, symposia, film screenings, and music performances at the Billy Wilder Theater which also houses the UCLA Film & Television Archive. The Hammer is home of the Armand Hammer Collection of American and European paintings, as well as the Armand Hammer Daumier and Contemporaries Collection and the Hammer Contemporary Collection. The Hammer Contemporary Collection focuses on art of all media since 1960 with an emphasis on works of the last ten years, works on paper, and art made in Los Angeles. The museum also houses the Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts—comprising more than 45,000 prints, drawings, photographs, and artists’ books from the Renaissance to the present—and oversees the Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden at UCLA. Free admission to the Hammer Museum is made possible through the generosity of benefactors Erika J. Glazer and Brenda R. Potter.

    HAMMER MUSEUM INFORMATION
    Admission to all exhibitions and programs at the Hammer Museum is free. Visit www.hammer.ucla.edu for current exhibition and program information and call (310) 443-7041 for tours. Hours: Tuesday–Friday 11 a.m.–8 p.m., Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Closed Mondays and national holidays. The Hammer is located at 10899 Wilshire Boulevard in Westwood, Los Angeles. Parking is available onsite for $6 (maximum 3 hours) or for a $6 flat rate after 6 p.m.


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    THE CALIFORNIA AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM OPENS ITS FALL SEASON ON OCTOBER 19, PRESENTING FOUR NEW EXHIBITIONS



    (Los Angeles, CA) — The California African American Museum today announced that its fall season of exhibitions will open to the public on October 19, 2016, celebrating the work of several generations of contemporary artists and historical figures.


    ruby onyinyechi amanze, Kindred, 2014; graphite, ink, pigment, enamel, photo transfers, glitter on paper; 80” x 78”; photo courtesy of Tiwani Contemporary, London and the artist.


    This season, the exhibitions consider a range of subjects, from works by contemporary artists in Los Angeles and elsewhere in the United States to the intriguing history of the 1936 Olympics in Nazi Germany and the African American athletes who competed there. Also on view is the Los Angeles debut of Hank Willis Thomas’s celebrated video, Black Righteous Space, and the latest installment of the Museum’s selections from the permanent collection. These new exhibitions and the public programs planned in conjunction with them are overseen by Deputy Director Naima J. Keith, who joined CAAM in February 2016 after holding curatorial positions at The Studio Museum in Harlem and Hammer Museum.

    George O. Davis, Executive Director of the California African American Museum said, “Whether presenting emerging artist Genevieve Gaignard, offering a focused look into the history of the 1936 Olympics, delving into a range of contemporary concerns and formal issue with contemporary African artists, or showcasing the range of work available in our permanent collection, these exhibitions examine unique facets of American history and contemporary art.”

    CAAM’s fall exhibitions are:

    The Ease of Fiction

    October 19, 2016–February 26, 2017

    In The Ease of Fiction, works by four contemporary African artists living in the United States serve as a foundation for a critical discussion about history, fact, and fiction. Recent paintings, drawings, and sculptural works by ruby onyinyechi amanze (b. 1982, Nigeria), Duhirwe Rushemeza (b. 1977, Rwanda), Sherin Guirguis (b. 1974, Egypt), and Meleko Mokgosi (b. 1981, Botswana) explore power, memory, personal agency, and play.


    Sherin Guirguis, Untitled (lahzet zaman), 2013, mixed media on hand-cut paper, 108 x 72 inches, photo courtesy of The Third Line Gallery, Dubai and the artist.


    The exhibition’s title evokes the idea that people are often more comfortable accepting or believing what is told to them by those in power, rather than challenging and investigating the authenticity of information presented as historical fact. Interweaving their personal experiences and memories into broader historical contexts, these artists create works that are in strident opposition to passive acceptance. The artists' cultural backgrounds and geographic diversity offer a provocative examination of varied perspectives of the truth. Although these artists are from four different African countries their work addresses universal issues that are relevant across all borders.

    This exhibition is organized by the Contemporary Art Museum Raleigh | CAM Raleigh and curated by independent curator Dexter Wimberly. CAAM’s presentation is organized by Mar Hollingsworth, Visual Arts Curator and Program Manager. The Ease of Fiction is made possible by generous support from AV Metro, Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, Citrix, Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Real Estate, and the Betty Eichenberger Adams Society. CAM Raleigh is funded in part by the City of Raleigh based on recommendations of the Raleigh Art Commission.

    Related public programs with featured artists:
    In Conversation: The Ease of Fiction
    Thursday, October 20, 2016 7–9 pm
    Location: Art + Practice, 4339 S. Leimert Blvd, Los Angeles

    This special edition of In Conversation takes place at Art + Practice in Leimert Park and bring together artists ruby onyinyechi amanze, Meleko Mokgosi, Duhirwe Rushemeza, and Sherin Guirguis and exhibition curator Dexter Wimberly on the occasion of the opening of The Ease of Fiction.

    In Conversation: Sherin Guirguis and Anuradha Vikram Thursday, December 1, 2016 7– 9 pm Los Angeles-based artist Sherin Guirguis joins curator and writer Anuradha Vikram, artistic director at Santa Monica’s 18th Street Art Center and senior lecturer at Otis College of Art and Design, for an intimate conversation exploring the relationships between social structures, cultural identity, and women’s agency.

    Genevieve Gaignard: Smell the Roses
    October 19, 2016–February 12, 2017

    CAAM presents the first museum exhibition of the work of Los Angeles artist Genevieve Gaignard, who deftly uses installation, photographic self-portraiture, and sculpture to explore race, femininity, and class—and their various intersections. The daughter of a black father and white mother in a Massachusetts mill town, Gaignard’s youth was marked by a strong sense of invisibility. Was her family white enough to be white? Black enough to be black? In this new, immersive installation she invokes post-Katrina New Orleans shotgun houses and white picket fences to address questions of “passing,” positioning her own female body as the chief site of exploration and challenging viewers to navigate the powers and anxieties of intersectional identity.


    Genevieve Gaignard, Extra Value (After Venus), 2016, chromogenic print, 24 x 36 in, courtesy the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles.


    Influenced by the soulful sounds of Billy Stewart, the kitschy aesthetic of John Waters, and the provocative artifice of drag culture, Gaignard employs lowbrow pop sensibilities to create dynamic visual narratives. From the identity performance ritualized in ‘‘selfie” culture to the gender displays of hyper-femme footwear, Gaignard blends humor, persona, and popular culture to reveal the ways in which the meeting and mixing of contrasting realities can feel like displacement.

    Gaignard received her BA in Photography from Massachusetts College of Art and Design (2007) and an MFA in Photography from Yale University (2014).

    This exhibition is curated by CAAM’s Deputy Director, Naima J. Keith. Related public program with featured artist:
    Thursday, November 3, 2016 7–9 pm
    In Conversation: Genevieve Gaignard and Naima J. Keith

    A walkthrough of the exhibition is followed by an artist talk and audience Q & A.

    Politics, Race, and Propaganda: The Nazi Olympics, Berlin 1936
    October 19, 2016–February 26, 2017

    For two weeks in August 1936, Adolf Hitler’s dictatorship masked its racist, militarist character while hosting the Olympic Games. To divert attention from its anti-Semitic agenda and plans for territorial expansion, the regime exploited the Games to dazzle spectators with a false image of a peaceful, tolerant Germany.


    American Olympic athlete Jesse Owens runs his historic 200-meter race at the 11th Olympiad in Berlin. Owens won the race with a time of 20.7 seconds, establishing a new Olympic record. Courtesy of Library of Congress.


    Prior to the Games a controversial proposed boycott was hotly debated—especially in the United States—due to the racial discrimination of the Nazi regime. Yet once the International Olympic Committee quelled concerns about the safety of black athletes in Nazi Germany, most African American newspapers opposed a boycott. Many journalists underscored the hypocrisy of pro-boycotters who did not first address discrimination against black athletes here at home. In the end, eighteen African American athletes, including Jesse Owens, Mack Robinson, and Ralph Metcalfe, competed for the United States at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

    Politics, Race, and Propaganda: The Nazi Olympics, Berlin 1936 features historic photographs and documents, riveting films, Olympics promotional materials, and first-person accounts that tell the stories of athletes who were barred because of their ethnic heritage, those who boycotted the Games in protest, and the African Americans who competed and won a total of fourteen medals, refuting the Nazi myth of “Aryan” supremacy. The exhibition, organized by United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, will be presented in Los Angeles for the first time and will feature a number of key additions, including one of the gold medals Jesse Owens earned during the 1936 Games.

    Politics, Race, and Propaganda: The Nazi Olympics, Berlin 1936 is produced by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, presented by the Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games, and sponsored by the Foundation for Global Sports Development.

    Taking Place: Selections from the Permanent Collection
    October 19, 2016–February 26, 2017

    For centuries artists have rendered landscapes—both real and imagined—to consider issues of history, belonging, disenfranchisement, and more. Landscapes can bear witness to stories from the past and offer powerful lessons in the present. Taking Place: Selections from the Permanent Collection includes photographs and paintings that depict urban scenes, rural landscapes, and visions of the African diaspora, all of which speak to notions of history and home among African Americans.

    Richard Mayhew’s abstract paintings epitomize love and respect for the land, while works by Frank Williams and Dewey Crumpler celebrate its sheer beauty and spiritual connotations. Landscapes by Robert Duncanson and Edward Bannister assert the artists’ existence and claim ownership for future generations. The California landscape is reflected in breathtaking photographs of the town of Allensworth, and unexpected stories of Los Angeles appear in the works of Dominique Moody and Sadie Barnette.

    This exhibition is curated by Mar Hollingsworth, Visual Arts Curator and Program Manager.
    In addition to the new exhibitions noted above, CAAM will also continue to present the California premiere of this interactive video work:

    Hank Willis Thomas: Black Righteous Space
    July 7, 2016–February 12, 2017

    In Black Righteous Space, artist Hank Willis Thomas examines race through the lens of pop culture, advertising, and media. Dazzling motion graphics appear amidst a looping soundtrack that includes songs, speeches, and dialogue from more than fifty noted black figures including Malcolm X, James Baldwin, Richard Pryor, and Gil-Scott Heron. At random intervals the soundtrack goes silent, allowing visitors to approach a microphone and add their own voices to the conversation.

    About the California African American Museum
    CAAM explores the art, history, and culture of African Americas. Chartered by the State of California in 1977, the Museum began formal operations in 1981 and is a state-supported agency and a Smithsonian Affiliate. In addition to presenting exhibitions and public programs, CAAM houses a permanent collection of more than four thousand works of art, artifacts, and historical documents, and a publicly accessible research library containing more than twenty thousand volumes.

    Visitor Information
    Admission to the California African American Museum is free. Visit caammuseum.org for current exhibition and program information or call 213-744-7432 for tours or additional assistance.

    Hours: Tuesday–Saturday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Closed Mondays and national holidays. The California African American Museum is located in Exposition Park at the corner of Figueroa Street and Exposition Boulevard, west of the 110 (Harbor) Freeway. Easy parking is available for $12 (cash only) at 39th and Figueroa Streets. The Metro Expo line stop Expo Park/USC is a five-minute walk through the Exposition Park Rose Garden to the Museum.


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    American Writers Museum Announces March 2017 Opening in Prime Chicago Location

    - First museum of its kind in United States, dedicated to American writers both past and present, opening early next year on Chicago’s famed Michigan Avenue -


    (CHICAGO – April 12, 2016) – The United States’ rich cultural landscape will expand early next year when the American Writers Museum (AWM) opens its doors in March 2017. The first and only museum of its kind in the nation, American Writers Museum, located at 180 North Michigan Avenue, will engage the public in celebrating American writers, and exploring their influence on our history, identity, culture, and daily lives.

    “I enthusiastically support the efforts to place a national writers museum in Chicago,” said Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

    Showcasing the personal stories and literary works of diverse American writers, from Mark Twain to Dr. Seuss, the interactive, high-tech museum is expected to draw up to 120,000 visitors annually. The museum’s esteemed curating team and National Advisory Council are working closely with internationally renowned museum and exhibit companies in the museum’s development. American Writers Museum is also collaborating with more than 50 authors’ homes and museums around the U.S., now AWM Affiliates, that will support its mission with author-specific knowledge and expertise, and foster an exchange of ideas and experiences.

    The museum’s themed galleries, interactive exhibits, educational programs, and special events will change regularly to continually surprise and engage visitors of all ages. They will come face-to-face with great writers using their zip codes in Writers Hall; accompany roving writers such as Kerouac and Steinbeck on their literary travels; and “visit” writers’ homes and fictional sites, such as “Tara,” “Cannery Row,” and “The House of the Seven Gables” in Nation of Writers. Exhibits such as The Mind of a Writer, A Writer’s Room, and Word Play will de-mystify famed writers’ lives and methodologies and invite visitor creativity with games and other immersive offerings. Readers Hall will host films, talks, readings, and presentations to school and other groups.

    “We are thrilled to have found the perfect space in the heart of downtown Chicago, just steps from the city’s major attractions,” says AWM founder and President, Malcolm E. O’Hagan. “The American Writers Museum will become a beloved attraction for Chicago residents and visitors from all over the world, and will provide an exciting and unprecedented opportunity to showcase our great writers and their works in one of the nation’s most culturally rich cities.”

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    (BPRW) Wells Fargo Gift Honors African American History and Culture

    - As founding donor, company gives $1 million, historical artifacts to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture -


    (Black PR Wire) CHARLOTTE, January 7, 2015 – Wells Fargo announced the donation of $1 million and historical artifacts from its corporate collection to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). The artifacts, a collection of two mining stock certificates and one piece of letterhead featuring the work of African American artist Grafton Tyler Brown, will be displayed in the NMAAHC’s inaugural exhibition scheduled to open in September 2016.

    Grafton Tyler Brown was an American painter, lithographer and cartographer who owned and operated his lithography company in San Francisco from 1867 to 1879. Brown was the first African American artist to create works depicting the Pacific Northwest and California. During this time, he created lithographs for stock certificates and letterheads for numerous companies in the area.

    The mining stock certificates and letterhead come directly from the Wells Fargo History Museum collection, which showcases the company’s shared history with communities in a network of 11 museums across the U.S., and will accompany a Grafton Tyler Brown oil painting already in the NMAAHC collection. View of Lake Okanagan (British Columbia), 1882, which was a gift of Curtis E. Ransom in memory of Julia Turner Ransom. Together, these items will help tell the story of the artist and the time that he spent in California. These items will be part of the exhibition “Visual Art and the American Experience.”

    “As one of the founding donors to our museum, Wells Fargo has provided invaluable support to help us create a museum like no other in the world,” said Lonnie G. Bunch III, director of the museum. “The documents are coming into a collection of more than 40,000 objects which will help us tell the African American story in a rich and compelling way, reaching millions of visitors through exhibitions, interactive platforms and the website.”

    Currently under construction on a five-acre site adjacent to the Washington Monument, the Smithsonian’s 19th museum will be a place where Americans can explore and celebrate the richness and diversity of the African American experience. Since its start in 2003, the museum has built collections and designed 11 inaugural exhibitions covering major periods of African American history from its origins in Africa and continuing through slavery, the civil rights era, the Harlem Renaissance, the great migrations north and west and into the 21st century.

    “African American history is American history,” says Lisa Frison, Vice President, African American Segment manager, Wells Fargo. “Wells Fargo is committed to celebrating the stories of African Americans in the hope of bringing broader visibility to the experiences that best represent an extraordinary community. We embrace the arts as a vehicle to highlight history and culture, and feel deeply honored to support the Smithsonian in bringing the African American story to life in such a significant way.”

    Support of the NMAAHC aligns with the company’s ongoing strategy to cultivate a deeper appreciation of the African American experience. Through its The Untold Stories Collection platform — which includes a national celebratory tour featuring The Kinsey Collection: Shared Treasures of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey – Where Art and History Intersect and #MyUntoldSM— Wells Fargo is working to promote dialogue around the experiences and contributions of African Americans to American history and culture.

    The company’s commitment to diversity and inclusion dates back more than 160 years. In 1888, an instruction booklet distributed to Wells Fargo agents noted, “Proper respect must be shown to all — let them be men, women, or children, rich or poor, white or black.” For more information about Wells Fargo’s commitment to the community, visit www.wellsfargo.com/about/csr.

    About Wells Fargo
    Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a nationwide, diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.8 trillion in assets. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, Wells Fargo provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through 8,700 locations, 12,800 ATMs, the internet (wellsfargo.com) and mobile banking, and has offices in 36 countries to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With approximately 265,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States. Wells Fargo & Company was ranked No. 30 on Fortune’s 2015 rankings of America’s largest corporations. In 2014, Wells Fargo donated $281.2 million in grants to 17,100 nonprofits, and team members volunteered 1.74 million hours around the country. Wells Fargo’s vision is to satisfy all our customers’ financial needs and help them succeed financially. Wells Fargo perspectives are also available at Wells Fargo Blogs and Wells Fargo Stories.

    About the Museum
    The National Museum of African American History and Culture was established by an Act of Congress through legislation signed into law in 2003 by President George W. Bush. The nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is under construction on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on a five-acre tract adjacent to the Washington Monument. Upon completion in September 2016, the museum will become the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural institution devoted exclusively to exploring and documenting the African American story and its impact on American history. For more information, visit the museum’s website at nmaahc.si.edu.

     The National Museum of African American History and Culture


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    (BPRW) Ford Announces $1 Million Donation to Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

    - Ford will donate $1 million to Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture to help celebrate richness and diversity of the African American experience - Donation builds on Ford’s long support of African Americans and a 40-year relationship with Smithsonian Institution - New Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture is slated to open in 2016 -


    (BLACK PR WIRE) – NEW ORLEANS--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Ford Motor Company is building on a century-long commitment to supporting the African American community with a $1 million donation to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

    The donation from Ford Motor Company Fund, the company’s philanthropic arm, will support the museum’s capital campaign. It will also go toward funding key programs when the museum – the only national site devoted exclusively to documenting African American life, art, history and culture – opens on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. in 2016.

    “Since Henry Ford’s groundbreaking $5 a day wage in 1913, which paid people equally regardless of race, Ford has invested in programs that empower and celebrate the African American community,” said Jim Vella, president, Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services. “Ford is proud to work with the Smithsonian on this museum that will recognize the tremendous contributions of African Americans to our country and our world.”

    Ford and the Smithsonian Institution jointly made the announcement today at the 20th anniversary of the ESSENCE Festival in New Orleans. Follow the social conversation at #fordgivesback.

    Ford’s relationship with the Smithsonian dates back 40 years, with the company donating more than $11.5 million to support exhibits and programs that provide educational opportunities for families:

    • Ford Fund supported the Smithsonian Freedom’s Sisters, which celebrated 20 African American women who fought for equality for all Americans and traveled to 12 cities from 2007 to 2012

    • In 2013, Ford Fund worked with the Smithsonian American History Museum to expand its Spark!Lab to three museums across the country. Designed to look and feel like an inventor’s workshop, these spaces challenge children to create, experiment and invent in interactive innovation workshops

    • Ford Fund currently supports the museum’s American Sabor exhibit that explores the influence of Latino musicians in America and is traveling to 13 cities through 2015

    • Ford Fund also is investing in conservation research for the giant panda at the National Zoo, including the popular Panda Cam, which allows visitors from around the world to view the newest panda cub online

    “We are so pleased that the Ford Motor Company Fund has chosen to join hundreds of donors from across the country to build a groundswell of support for the National Museum of African American History and Culture; we recognize this as a vote of confidence,” said Lonnie G. Bunch III, founding director of the museum. “It is a genuine honor to have the company join us in our commitment to bring to the nation’s capital a truly innovative cultural resource – one capable of telling a richer and fuller story of the development of this country.

    “We also applaud the Ford Motor Company for having a long history of contributing to the growth of African American communities for families who migrated to Detroit from the rural south,” Bunch added. “After hiring its first African American employee in 1914, Ford, by 1926, had hired more than 10,000 African Americans, making it the largest employer of African Americans in the auto industry. By 1931, 20 percent of Detroit’s African American population was supported by Ford jobs.”

    The National Museum of African American History and Culture was established by an act of Congress in 2003 as the 19th museum of the Smithsonian. It is the only national museum devoted exclusively to exploring and documenting American history through an African American lens. The nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is under construction on a five-acre site adjacent to the Washington Monument. It is being outfitted with 11 exhibitions at a cost of about $500 million. Half the cost is covered by the U.S. Congress; the museum is responsible for raising the rest.

    While its building is under construction, the museum is presenting exhibitions in its gallery at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. The current exhibit, “Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863 and the March on Washington, 1963,” explores these two civil rights milestones and the impact the events had on generations. It is open to the public through Sept. 7. For more information, visit the museum’s website.

    About Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services
    Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services works with community partners to advance driving safety, education and community life. The Ford Motor Company Fund has operated for more than 60 years with ongoing funding from Ford Motor Company. Ford Driving Skills for Life teaches new drivers through a variety of hands-on and interactive methods. Innovation in education is encouraged through programs that enhance high school learning and provide college scholarships and university grants. Through the Ford Volunteer Corps, more than 25,000 Ford employees and retirees each year work on projects that better their communities in 30 countries. For more information, visit http://community.ford.com.

    Follow at www.facebook.com/ford, www.twitter.com/ford or www.youtube.com/fordvideo1

    Source: Ford Motor Company

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    AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY CELEBRATES KWANZAA 2013: 35TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

    - SINGERS FROM BROADWAY HIT, “MOTOWN: THE MUSICAL,” AND RESTORATION DANCE THEATRE COMPANY PERFORM SATURDAY, DECEMBER 28, 12:15 to 2:15 pm -


    AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

    WHO
    Performers from the Tony-nominated “Motown: The Musical” sing a medley of Supremes hits, including “Where Did Our Love Go?” and Restoration Dance Theatre Company perform African, Caribbean, and modern dances in full costume to celebrate Kwanzaa 2013: 35th Anniversary Celebration at the American Museum of Natural History—one of the largest and longest-running Kwanzaa celebrations in the country.

    WHAT
    The American Museum of Natural History celebrates its 35th annual Kwanzaa celebration on Saturday, December 28, from noon to 5pm. The event celebrates the rich traditions of Kwanzaa and honors the holiday’s seven guiding principles.

    Hosted by storyteller Linda Humes, the festivities will also include family-friendly activities, exciting raffles, and an international marketplace. Back by popular demand, Oscar-nominated youth ensemble IMPACT Repertory Theatre, with Ugandan poet Emilia Ottoo, opens the show. Restoration Dance Theatre Company returns with an eclectic mix of African, Caribbean, and modern dances. Balance Dance Theatre, led by acclaimed choreographer Obediah Wright, performs. Bestselling author and award-winning filmmaker MK Asante introduces his landmark film, narrated by world-renowned poet Maya Angelou, The Black Candle: A Kwanzaa Celebration, followed by a book signing of his new memoir, Buck.

    Kwanzaa 2013 is co-presented by Community Works and New Heritage Theatre Group. The Kwanzaa marketplace is organized by the Harlem Arts Alliance.

    WHEN
    Saturday, December 28
    12:15 pm: The Supremes from “Motown: The Musical”
    12:45 pm: IMPACT Repertory Theatre introduced by Emilia Ottoo
    1:30 pm: Restoration Dance Theatre Company

    WHERE
    Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, American Museum of Natural History first floor
    Press should enter through the 79th Street and Central Park entrance.

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    “Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa” by Karen E. Milbourne

    Accompanying a pioneering exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art in Washington, DC, the book explores African art and its relationship to African concepts of the earth. One hundred exceptional works of art from the late 18th to 21st centuries are featured, including photography, painting, sculpture and statuary, sacred figures and vessels, as well as historic treasures such as an exquisite Punu reliquary (Gabon) from the collection of the Musée du Quai Branly (Paris) and a rare Yorube onile figure from the museum’s collection that is reunited (in the book and in the exhibition) for the first time with its mate from the Afrika Museum in Berg en Dal, Netherlands.

    Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa
    The contemporary works alongside works are by internationally renowned and emerging talents from across the continent, including William Kentridge, Ingrid Mwangi, Sammy Baloji, Ghada Amer and El Anatsui.

    “Earth Matters” is comprised of 6 chapters – and the exhibition is also organized in 6 thematic section at the museum:

    Chapter 1:The Material Earth, Chapter 2: The Power of the Earth, Chapter 3: Imagining the Underground, Chapter 4: Strategies of the Surface, Chapter 5: Environmental Action, and Chapter 6: Earth Works.

    The book also contains 4 powerful artists’ statements prepared by working artists, from Africa and the diaspora, who are passionately engaged and further the deep inspiration they draw from Africa and the earth. The artist essays are: Wangechi Mutu “The Power of Earth in My Work,” Clive van den Berg “Breaking Surface,” Allan DeSouza “Where You Looking At,” and George Osodi “Matter, Eco-Ethics, And Composite Space: Thoughts On My Pictorial Compositions.”

    Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa • Karen E. Milbourne

    320 pages
    9-1/2 x 11 inches
    250 color illustrations
    ISBN 978-1-58093-370-4
    $50.00 hardcover November 12, 2013
    http://www.amazon.com/Earth-Matters-Material-Metaphor-Africa/dp/158093370X
    http://www.monacellipress.com/book/?isbn=9781580933704
    twitter.com/monacellipress
    The Monacelli Press
    236 West 27th Street, 4th Floor
    New York, New York 10001


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BLACK / AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUMS
   

  1. A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum ...
    Information, African American, labor history museum, Chicago, gift shop.
    http://aphiliprandolphmuseum.com/

  2. Acacia Collection Gallery and Museum ...
    Rich collection, African American, artifacts, textiles, tools, art. Savannah GA.
    http://www.acaciacollection.com

  3. African-American Mosaic Exhibition ...
    Exhibit, publication ,Library of Congress, Black history, culture.
    http://www.lcweb.loc.gov/exhibits/african/intro.html

  4. African American Museum in Phillidelphia ...
    Exhibits, events, educational programs, membership, general information.
    http://aampmuseum.org/

  5. Art Museum of Southeast Texas ...
    Art Museum of Southeast Texas located in Beaumont, Texas. Museum, African American, history, culture.
    http://www.amset.org/

  6. Association of African American Museums ...
    Established to support African and African American focus museums nationally and internationally, as well as the professionals who protect, preserve and interpret African and African American art, history and culture.
    http://www.blackmuseums.org/

  7. Augusta Museum of History ...
    Augusta Museum of History is dedicated to collecting, preserving and interpreting history in relation to the past of Augusta and its environs for the education and enrichment of present and future generations.
    http://www.augustamuseum.org/

  8. Birmingham Civil Rights Institute ...
    Alabama, education, civil, human rights.
    http://bcri.bham.al.us/

  9. Boston African American National Historic Site ...
    15 pre-Civil War structures, Boston's Beacon Hill neighborhood, downloadable PDF maps.
    http://www.nps.gov/boaf/

  10. CAAM ...
    California African American Museum. We will find more open doors for CAAM to enter so that we can share the art, history and culture of African Americans as well as our perspective on the issues we all face on a planet that we all must share.
    http://www.caam.ca.gov/

  11. Children's Museum of Manhattan ...
    Children's Museum of Manhattan, New York City. A Museum for Children and Families. Listings of exhibits, events, classes, programs, performers.
    http://www.cmom.org/

  12. Civil Rights Museum ...
    The Museum exists to assist the public in understanding the lessons of the Civil Rights Movement and its impact and influence on the human rights movement worldwide.
    http://www.civilrightsmuseum.org/

  13. DuSable Museum of African American History ...
    Museum, African American history, Founded in 1957, Dr. Margaret T. and Charles G. Burroughs, Chicago.
    http://www.dusablemuseum.org/

  14. Enslaved Africans - Rain Garden ...
    A public art project which commemorates the lives of enslaved Africans who lived at the Philipse Manor Hall in Yonkers, New York – six of whom were the first to be manumitted by law in the United States in 1787, seventy six years before the Emancipation Proclamation.
    http://www.enslavedafricansraingarden.org/

  15. Harrison Museum ...
    African American Culture's mission is, to research, preserve and interpret the achievements of African Americans.
    http://www.harrisonmuseum.org/

  16. Idaho Black History Museum ...
    History ,culture, African Americans, exhibits, educational, community calendar.
    http://www.ibhm.org/

  17. Jim Crow Virtual Museum ...
    Our mission is to promote racial tolerance by helping people understand the historical and contemporary expressions of intolerance.
    http://www.ferris.edu/news/jimcrow/index.htm

  18. Louisiana State Museum ...
    Louisiana State Museum website; Online exhibits and digital library collections focusing on the unique history and culture of Louisiana.
    http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/

  19. LSU Museum of Art ...
    The LSU Museum of Art (LSU MOA), located in the Shaw Center for the Arts in downtown Baton Rouge, La. The museum's significant collection of American and British portraiture, furniture, and decorative arts has grown.
    http://www.lsumoa.com/

  20. Museum of Afro American History ...
    The Museum of Afro American History, Boston, is a not-for-profit cultural institution dedicated to preserving, conserving and accurately interpreting the contributions of African Americans.
    http://www.afroammuseum.org/

  21. National Great Blacks In Wax Museum ...
    National Great Blacks In Wax Museum America's national Black Educational Museum located in Baltimore Maryland close to Washington, DC.
    http://www.greatblacksinwax.org/

  22. National Museum Of African Art ...
    Leading center for the visual arts of Africa, fosters and sustains, through exhibitions, collections, research, and public programs an interest in and an understanding of diverse cultures.
    http://africa.si.edu/

  23. San Francisco African American Museum ...
    SF African American Historical & Cultural Society presents selected exhibits on African and/or African American artists.
    http://www.sfstation.com/museums/african.htm

  24. The African American Multicultural Museum ...
    The African American Multicultural Museum is a local Museum with a global perspective. An extensive variety of exhibits and programs featuring art, historical items, speakers, and artist will be highlighted throughout the year. The Museum will keynote multiculturalism by emphasizing the positive contributions of many races and cultures while incorporating the African American segment.
    http://www.azcama.com/museums/african_american.html

  25. The Griot Museum of Black History & Culture ...
    Only the second of its kind the country, The Griot Museum of Black History & Culture opened as The Black World History Wax Museum in February 1997. St. Louis, MO.
    http://www.thegriotmuseum.com/

  26. The Institute of Black Invention & Technology, Inc ...
    The institute is a traveling museum that presents exhibits and lectures about Black inventors from slavery to the present. Exhibit programs are appropriate pre-school, school-age, and college audiences.
    http://www.tibit.biz/

  27. The Lucy Craft Laney Museum ...
    The Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History located in Augusta, Georgia.
    http://www.lucycraftlaneymuseum.com/

  28. The River Road African American Museum ...
    The River Road African American Museum, located in Donaldsonville, Louisiana, is dedicated to collecting, preserving, and interpreting art, artifacts buildings related the history culture of Americans rural communities along Mississippi between Baton Rouge New Orleans.
    http://www.africanamericanmuseum.org/

  29. Tubman African American Museum ...
    Macon Georgia, honor Harriet Tubman, educating people, African American art, history, culture.
    http://www.tubmanmuseum.com/

  30. United States National Slavery Museum ...
    Telling the complete story!
    http://constitution.laws.com/constitutional-convention/slave-trade











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