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    New Random House YA Novel Raises Awareness About Teen Dating Violence

    February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month


    February highlights one of the most sobering statistics in our country, 96% of teens say they have been emotionally or psychologically abused by a dating partner (http://www.safeyouth.com/)

    The powerful Delacorte/Random House young adult book, Die for You by Amy Fellner Dominy, explores the subtle, insidious danger of mental and emotional abuse so prevalent in teenage dating. With insight and sensitivity, Die for You offers hope to young women everywhere.

    Reviewers rave:


    "With a fresh voice, Dominy adeptly depicts how love can grow dark and that abuse isn’t always physical."—School Library Journal

    "This taut thriller unrolls hidden messages of abusive relationships with a sharp edge and well-drawn gray areas, leaving readers on the edge of their seats."—Booklist

    "In this delicate, tense exploration of teenage relationship abuse … the violence is handled sensitively, and readers are left hopeful for Emma's recovery. A perceptive portrait of relationship abuse."—Kirkus Reviews

    Synopsis:
    After her parent’s divorce forces Emma Lorde to move halfway across the state of Arizona to live with her father, Emma must face her senior year in a new school knowing absolutely no one. Then she meets Dillon Hobbs, and something just clicks.

    Dillon introduces Emma to friends she can call her own. He provides a refuge from the chaos of her past, and creates a blueprint for their future together. But just when everything seems perfect, Emma is offered an opportunity that will derail their plans. How can Dillon let her go when he understands that people don’t always come back. Uncertainty grows, and fear spirals into something darker.

    Now Dillon is the one who needs saving. But how much do you sacrifice for the one you love? What if Emma, by saving Dillon, loses herself?

    ISBN:978-1101936191
    Publisher: Delacorte/Random House

    About the author:
    Amy Fellner Dominy is a former advertising copywriter, MFA playwright and hula-hoop champion. Her novels for teens and tweens include Die For You (11/8/16); A Matter of Heart, Audition & Subtraction; and OyMG, a Sydney Taylor Notable Book. Amy’s first picture book, Cookiesaurus Rex, will be published by Disney, Fall 2017. Amy lives in Phoenix, Arizona with her husband, various pets and two children who occasionally stop by for free meals.

    Learn more about Amy Fellner Dominy at http://amydominy.com/ and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads.

    Die for You is available on Amazon , Barnes & Noble and wherever books are sold.

    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness.







    The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation


    Discovery Communications and The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation Partner to Introduce Students from Underserved Communities to Careers in Entertainment

    -- Discovery to co-host Foundation’s “Careers in Entertainment” tour stop at the company’s headquarters in 2017 --


    LOS ANGELES – Discovery Communications and The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation (WJSFF) announced their joint philanthropic partnership today, aligning the shared vision between both organizations. The partnership is a youth-development program that introduces deserving high school and college students across the country to careers in the media and entertainment industry. The partnership provides access to scholarships, internships, and mentorships designed to further professional development and networking opportunities for youth from underserved communities.




    “The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation and Discovery share a common mission: to give the talented, motivated and inspired young men and women -- who will one day be our thought-leaders and changemakers -- the resources to realize their career dreams and also create a better world,” said Jada Pinkett Smith, actress and co-founder of The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation. “This type of partnership is the reason that Will and I created our Foundation in the first place. Everyone, regardless of who they are or where they come from, should have an opportunity to tell their story; and whether in entertainment or any other industry, to use their unique perspective as a catalyst for change.”

    The partnership launches today in Los Angeles during the kick off of TLC’s 2017 Say Yes to the Prom initiative, an annual community outreach program from Discovery Communications created to remove the financial burden of prom and provide ongoing college and career support for deserving high school students. The new partnership is highlighted by the following elements:

  • All 1,000 Say Yes to the Prom participants nationwide will have the opportunity to participate in WJSFF’s Careers in Entertainment program (CIE), an initiative launched in 2016 to expose youth to careers in the entertainment industry. In turn, qualified CIE participants will have the opportunity to participate in Say Yes to the Prom events in their cities.


  • Discovery will endow 20 scholarships as part of a new Discovery/CIE Fellowship Program, available to eligible CIE and Say Yes to the Prom participants.


  • Qualified CIE participants looking to pursue careers in media or entertainment will have the opportunity to apply for internships at Discovery Communications’ U.S. offices.


  • Along with CIE’s in-person events, Say Yes to the Prom participants also will have access to CIE’s online network, offering members ongoing virtual mentorship opportunities.


  • “Discovery is proud to partner with The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation to foster the development and growth of the next generation of entertainment industry professionals,” said David Zaslav, President and CEO, Discovery Communications. “By combining the efforts of Discovery and CIE, we can make a greater impact and ensure that even more deserving students are given the tools and resources they need to succeed."

    The partnership will amplify the impact of WJSFF’s CIE Tour, a multi-city program designed to introduce attendees to entertainment industry professionals through Q&A panels and interactive career fairs. In addition to welcoming Say Yes to the Prom students to participate in CIE events in their area, Discovery Communications will this year co-host a CIE Tour stop at the company’s global headquarters in the Washington, D.C. metro area.




    “The media and entertainment industry will shine brightly in the future if its next leaders accurately represent the rich diversity of background and thought in society today,” said Adria Alpert Romm, Chief Human Resources and Global Diversity Officer for Discovery Communications and creator of Say Yes to the Prom. “These young adults can be the future of our industry, and we look forward to this partnership giving them a strong foundation on which to build.”

    For more information on CIE, please visit: http://cietour.org/. For up to date information on this year’s Say Yes to the Prom initiative as well as photos and videos, please visit www.tlc.com/sayyestotheprom and follow #SYTTP on Twitter and Instagram.

    About The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation
    Dedicated to the betterment of the world around us, The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation assists individuals, charities, and organizations in the areas of education, health and sustainability. Learn more about The Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation and the Careers in Entertainment initiative on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube.

    About Say Yes to the Prom
    Now in its sixth year, Say Yes to the Prom is an annual giveback initiative from TLC and parent company Discovery Communications designed to remove the financial burden of prom for deserving high school students across the U.S. and prepare them as they look ahead towards college and careers. An extension of TLC’s popular Say Yes to the Dress franchise, in 2017 Say Yes to the Prom will host events in five U.S. cities to impact nearly 1,000 academically high-achieving and underserved high school girls and boys with a day of mentorship, prom dress shopping, tuxedo rentals, and one-on-one style sessions with TLC’s Monte Durham. Going beyond the dress and tuxedo, educational extensions including scholarship, mentorship and internship opportunities extend the impact of the program for participants long beyond prom night.

    About Discovery Communications
    Discovery Communications (Nasdaq: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK) satisfies curiosity and engages superfans with a portfolio of premium nonfiction, sports and kids programming brands. Reaching 3 billion cumulative viewers across pay-TV and free-to-air platforms in more than 220 countries and territories, Discovery’s portfolio includes the global brands Discovery Channel, TLC, Investigation Discovery, Animal Planet, Science and Turbo/Velocity, as well as OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network in the U.S., Discovery Kids in Latin America, and Eurosport, the leading provider of locally relevant, premium sports content across Europe. Discovery reaches audiences across screens through digital-first programming from Discovery VR, over-the-top offerings Eurosport Player and Dplay, as well as TV Everywhere products comprising the GO portfolio of TVE apps and Discovery K!ds Play. For more information, please visit www.discoverycommunications.com.


    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
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    BE REAL, BE RIGHTEOUS, BE RELEVANT: DEE-1 DISCUSSES FISCAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY, DURING DFREE® CONFERENCE


    Franklin Township, New Jersey – He may be blowing up as a rapper but Dee-1, a.k.a. David Augustine Jr., still drives a 1998 Honda Accord and recently told an audience of more than 100 young people that he left his job as a math teacher to be a positive influence over a greater number of youth.



    “I saw how much my students wanted to be like rappers,” Dee-1 said of his time as a 5th grade math teacher in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. “I never saw someone from my city of New Orleans who was a positive influence….There are people with millions of fans (who are) teaching a negative message….I need to get out here and get back as many people as I can, with my message.”

    Interviewed by AllHipHop.com’s Chuck Creekmur, Dee-1 spent more than an hour inspiring middle school to college students with his message of hope as part of the 5th Annual Financial Freedom Conference last week hosted by Rev. Dr. DeForest “Buster” Soaries at the First Baptist Church of Lincoln Gardens (FBCLG). Dee-1 explained that his “3Up” symbol stands for his new life motto, “be real, be righteous, be relevant,” and asked students to be productive, spiritual members of society – starting with fiscal responsibility.

    “Don’t even start college unless you know you’re going to finish. You have to pay those loans back,” Dee-1 said. “I used to pay the minimum back….When I signed a record deal, I got a bunch of money all at once. The first thing I did with my money? I paid Sallie Mae back….One thing I love about my car is that it is paid off. All of my jewelry? Gifts…. I don’t spend my money. I got out of debt because debt is a new form of slavery nowadays.”

    Dee-1 told students that they need to be financially intelligent and know their numbers. “Rappers are always talking about, ‘get that money,’ but nobody talks about what to do when you get the money.” He said that while many rappers promote negative and frivolous lifestyles in their videos, he would rather anonymously send money to a fan in need than to waste money.

    Creekmur, who is a FBCLG member, said he talks to his own daughter about financial responsibility. “It’s important you all make wise decisions and right decisions,” he said. “Don’t be so cool that you’re a knucklehead and ignore your elders. I talk to my daughter about APR, annual percentage rates, mortgages instead of renting…Slavery comes in different forms now. It’s not just shackles.”

    Admitting that his life was rough until he turned to God, Dee-1 said he didn’t always make good decisions. He said the main reason he went to college, Louisiana State University, was because his then-girlfriend enrolled. While he was chasing her, Dee-1 said, she was cheating on him. He also had a roommate who sold drugs out of their dorm room. “I was like, ‘we just left biology class!’” Dee-1 said of his disbelief that the roommate would drag him into danger. He said he made a hard decision to request a room change and shortly after, the roommate was arrested.

    Not only are his song lyrics positive but most reflect his real life experience. Dee-1 started getting noticed for his 2009 hit Jay, 50 and Weezy, which he said was his first attempt to address rappers who “are so powerful, they have so much paper, they have so much platform, but they’re not doing anything positive with it.” He said he’s not sure how much influence the song has had but that it’s important for youth to “speak truth” to power.

    “It’s not your job in life to save everyone,” Dee-1 said. “You can plant the seed….At least I shined my light in that way.”

    Dee-1 was signed by RCA Inspiration in 2013. Among his singles, he celebrates paying off his student loans with the song “Sallie Mae Back.” Known as a positive hip-hop recording artist, Dee-1 promotes a lifestyle of self-empowerment and community service. Some of his songs have garnered over 1 million hits on YouTube.

    Noting that his grandfather was a personal hero who taught him a lot about money, Dee-1 told students about a time when both his grandparents’ cars broke down and he was anxious to see what they would do. His grandfather pulled out $25,000 cash that he had hidden and taught him about the importance of saving. That year, Dee-1 started a job serving “sno balls” (also known as ‘sno cones’) and was proud to save his first $800.

    Sharing his motto, Dee-1 told students that “people can appreciate you more when you’re real; doing right is right and doing wrong is wrong” and “to be relevant in life.” He also offered them four other lessons: “Shut up and grind. You can’t make excuses. You have to focus on what your mission/vision is. Be so great that you’re indispensable….God has a way of making room for us, for our talents.”

    Dee-1 told the students that his next album, Slingshot David, focuses on the biblical story because “we all have a little David in us.” He dropped the mixtape for the album in July. He then performed, kicking off with Against Us and demonstrating to students how he incorporates God into his lyrics while still sounding like a rapper. He closed the show with his emotional, Both Sides of the Gun, a true story about one of his former students who was killed by another. During his talk, he mentioned how proud he was to take pictures with Gospel Legend Erica Campbell, who also performed at the conference. He then remained as long as students wanted to take pictures with them.

    “His message is so important. We’re trying to get young people to focus on these issues before they run into problems,” said Soaries, who also noted that the youth attending the “Say Yes to a Brighter Future” segment of the conference also received dfree® training and advice on topics such as how to pay for college.

    Soaries created dfree® in 2005 to combat the American consumer culture that encourages people to become fixated on materialism instead of true meaning and purpose. In particular, Soaries focuses on helping faith-based individuals, groups and organizations end the debilitating cycle of debt, delinquency and deficits and move to financial stability and freedom.

    The “Say Yes to the Next Level” conference, Nov. 10-12, 2016, was intended to motivate existing dfree® participants to accomplish their goals and to attract new audiences. The conference encouraged participants to reevaluate personal values, habits, attitudes and relationships in order to prepare themselves to move toward financial wholeness. It was held at FBCLG, 771 Somerset Street, Somerset, New Jersey 08873. It included concerts, networking, youth activities and dfree® training and support. The title sponsor for the conference was Prudential Financial, with Wells Fargo, Chase Bank, City National Bank, Mazda Motor Corporation, Lyft, Stand Together, Griffin Capital Funding, Independence Realty Trust, Federal Home Loan Bank of NY, Merrill Lynch, Think Finance, Mobiloans and others.

    About dfree®:
    Founded in 2005, dfree® is a financial freedom movement that addresses the cultural, psychological and spiritual influences on financial wellness and offers practical strategies for achieving financial success. dfree® was featured by CNN in a 90­minute documentary, “Almighty Debt,” an installment of the “Black in America” series, hosted by Soledad O’Brien. The dfree® strategy is being used by hundreds of churches and organizations worldwide. For more information about dfree® visit www.mydfree.org and follow the hashtag, #dFreeNextLevel, on social media.

    About Soaries:
    Rev. Dr. DeForest B. Soaries Jr. is known as an active agent for change and is a widely-requested speaker. He is the Senior Pastor of First Baptist Church of Lincoln Gardens in Somerset, New Jersey and former New Jersey Secretary of State. His pastoral ministry focuses on spiritual growth, educational excellence, economic empowerment and faith-based community development. Soaries, author of Say Yes to No Debt: 12 Steps to Financial Freedom, has issued a Billion Dollar Challenge as a national initiative and free resource to help individuals and families collectively pay down $1 billion in consumer debt.


    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness.







    How To Raise Thrifty And Generous Teenagers


    From piggy banks to that first savings account, many children are taught the value of saving from an early age.

    But as they grow to adolescence, following parental advice sometimes gives way to peer or media influences, and those once-thrifty children are now teenagers in a consumer-driven world where spending, not saving, is king.

    “Nearly everyone falls into two categories: spenders and savers,” says John Cortines, co-author with Gregory Baumer of God and Money: How We Discovered True Riches at Harvard Business School (www.godandmoney.net). “Spending is easy, so it’s up to parents to start conversations with their teens on the importance of saving and, just as importantly, giving.”

    Cortines and Baumer suggest three ways parents can help teens establish good financial habits before they reach adulthood, and pave the way for those teens to become generous people as well as good savers:

  • Help them begin saving for retirement now. Teens who land a part-time job often want to save money to buy a car or they simply want to enjoy a little financial freedom with weekend shopping sprees. Unless they’re careful, that money burning a proverbial hole in their pocket is spent before the next payday. Parents can help them think beyond today by suggesting they invest a portion of that income in a Roth IRA. Mom and Dad can even consider matching their teen dollar-for-dollar on their savings. “Explain the wonder of compounding investment returns – how the money they invest as a teen could be worth 10 to 20 times as much when they retire,” Cortines says.

  • Family philanthropy. Even if the gifts are modest, Cortines and Baumer advocate involving teens in the family giving plan. Encourage them to research charities and apply for “grants” from the family’s budget for giving. “The experience of learning about nonprofits will be invaluable,” Baumer says. This is also where another portion of the teen’s earnings from a part-time job could be placed.

  • Let them into your journey. Parents should model what they want their teens to emulate. Cortines said this begins with “letting them see your character as reflected in financial decisions.” That doesn’t mean letting teens know their parents’ net worth or the details of their income. Baumer and Cortines suggest explaining to teens how living modestly has short- and long-term benefits, whether it has allowed an early payoff of a mortgage, or demonstrates that frugal purchasing decisions leave money available for charitable giving.

    “If you frame the conversation well,” Baumer says, “teens will benefit from seeing your character on display as you navigate your finances.” Once saving and giving goals are fulfilled, teens can then begin to focus on spending. “But unless spending is kept under control,” Cortines says, “saving and giving simply aren’t possible at any meaningful level.”

    About John Cortines and Greg Baumer
    John Cortines and Greg Baumer are co-authors of God and Money: How We Discovered True Riches at Harvard Business School (www.godandmoney.net). Baumer is VP of Business Development for naviHealth, a Nashville-based healthcare technology firm. Cortines is Executive VP of Emerging Leaders for Generous Giving, an organization that exists to share the biblical message of generosity.


    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness.







    Adolescence Is Not A Disease’ – Helping Teens Succeed In A Complex World


    When did all teenagers become anxious, depressed and lose their ability to cope?

    The truth is, in most cases, they didn’t.

    “There is a tendency in our culture to treat young people who are struggling as if there is something wrong with them,” says Jeffrey Leiken (www.Leiken.com), Adolescence Expert, CEO of Evolution Mentoring International and co-founder of HeroPath International. “We send them to doctors, therapists and specialists who all try to figure out and ‘treat’ what is broken.”

    Leiken tackles the problems that teenagers – and their parents – face in his new book, Adolescence Is Not A Disease: Beyond Drinking, Drugs & Dangerous Friends – The Journey to Adulthood.

    “My methodology begins with the presumption that there is nothing wrong with the teen, but there is a lot wrong with the current system” he says. “Instead, I focus on figuring out what they need that will help them thrive.”

    Leiken, a San Francisco-based mentor and consultant, uses relationship, advice, perspective guidance and learning about life to help teens and parents get through this challenging period.

    “This is in stark contrast to the medical/clinical/assessment paradigm that dominates the youth development field and heavily influences parents in their thinking and decision making – a system that is largely based on fear and pathology (illness),” he says.

    “Each child is different. Each faces his or her own challenges. Rather than get overwhelmed by a dozen different ‘how-to-parent’ theories, parents only need to become the expert in what works in raising their own teens.”

    That means parents need to understand how to communicate and relate effectively with their children, and how to bring the right experiences, opportunities and learning that will best help their child to grow, Leiken says. This is based on who they are, and what their interests, strengths, talents, ambitions and challenges may be.

    For example, Leiken says that eliminating choices that are not right for a teen is much more effective than allowing them to keep all options open. “This will significantly increase the quality of their decision making,” he says.

    Instead of helping adolescents to get into the best colleges, Leiken recommends that parents help them find the program that works best for them, even if that means not going to college at all.

    “Parents need to help them identify their strengths and interests,” he says, “and to build a life that flows from these.”

    About Jeffrey Leiken
    Jeffery Leiken (www.Leiken.com) is the CEO of Evolution Mentoring International and is co-founder of HeroPath International. Leiken also is author of “Adolescence is Not a Disease: Beyond Drinking, Drugs and Dangerous Friends – The Journey to Adulthood.” He has presented at TED in Athens, Greece; guest lectured at Stanford University; and facilitated programs for teenagers on three continents and in seven countries, among other accomplishments. He has a master’s degree in educational counseling.


    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness.







    Combating Teen Homelessness In NYC With Technology Top IT Experts Team Up to Educate Teens in Foster Care


    Combating Teen Homelessness In NYC


    May 31, 2016, New York, NY - The statistics are alarming. Eighty percent of homeless people in NYC were formerly in the foster care system. When a foster-care youth reaches the age of 18 and has not been adopted, they "age out" of the system and are essentially abandoned and completely unprepared to be on their own. Almost universally, they have minimal education, very high dropout rates, absolutely no parental or adult guidance, no life skills, no qualifications, and no living arrangements.

    That's why the Techie Youth Foundation's Founder and President - Eric David Benari, is on a mission. He's teamed up with other experts in the field to provide free IT education to any youth of employable age in the foster-care system to help combat homelessness.

    Combating Teen Homelessness In NYC


    " It is never the kids' fault they are in the foster-care system. Most of them enter the system due to severe parental abuse or extreme neglect. Kids who don't enter the Techie Youth program and age-out of care are likely to become incarcerated within 18-24 months. Many will become homeless, and nearly half of all females will become pregnant within one year. Any of the students who participate in the program could within a very short time be earning much more than what is required to live adequately,” says Benari.

    After five months of classes, the Techie Youth Foundation is proud to announce they recently celebrated their first graduating class at the Microsoft Store on 5th Avenue.

    Combating Teen Homelessness In NYC


    About Eric David Benari:

    David Benari, PMP, is the Founder & President of Techie Youth. He is an IT business expert and master-technologist who has founded and/or built the infrastructure for a large portfolio of ventures, spanning sectors of social networks, e-commerce, B2B, open-source, online advertising (while in a senior-role at Yahoo!) and others. Benari has been invited to speak at numerous conferences and universities, including NYU and MIT, and is a published writer for Forbes and MIT CIO Corner, to name a few. Benari is also the Chairman/Coordinator/Organizer of the world's largest community of database-technology professionals.

    For more information on the Techie Youth Foundation, visit: www.TechieYouth.org or www.TechieYouth.org/hope.


    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness.







    Building Your Brand for High School Graduation

    William Jackson, M.Ed.
    Edward Waters College
    Educational Technology and Social Media
    @wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach


    “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” William Butler Yeats Building Your Brand for High School Graduation High school students across this nation as harsh as it may sound need to be involved with, associated to and actively participate in positive educational, social and leadership building experiences in and out of school.

    It is important that high school freshmen start to understand the importance of what is a Brand and what their developing Brand is. Branding and Marketing are collaborations, before high school students can market themselves they have to establish a Brand, their personal Brand. Understanding their abilities, recognizing talents, building skills and planning strategies that involve yearly growth in school and in the community are vital before the thoughts of graduation.

    Branding is not the style in clothes, current footwear fads, artistic hairstyles, video gaming high scores or even the latest language slang; it is being prepared to academically compete in a highly competitive and diverse world on a foundational level based on education and personal growth and improvement. High school students and their parents are making decisions that will have long lasting affects throughout their lives; ranging from higher education, military service, entrepreneurialism, vocational school or other avenues of educational programs and/or employment decisions.

    Graduation day and after is not the time to be making life long decisions, they should be planned and coordinated with a goal starting the freshmen year or at the latest sophomore year. Branding must be taught early to establish a mental path to personal acceptance and building of skill sets that help to prepare for a life of continued learning and personal growth.

    20 Suggestion to build a high school students Brand

    1. Write down what you like to do.
    2. Write down what you can do.
    3. Write down what you would like to learn.
    4. Write down what you need to learn.
    5. Write down what you struggle with.
    6. Write down what you avoid learning and why.
    7. Write down the last book you read and the ones you want to read.
    8. Write down the last time you went to the library, museum or cultural event.
    9. Write down who your mentor(s) are and why.
    10. Write down the last productive thing you learned from your friends.
    11. Write down the last time you volunteered in the community.
    12. Write down who influences your thinking and why.
    13. Write down where your faith is and where you got it from.
    14. Write down what you believe are your: morals, values, and ethics
    15. Write down your 5, 10,15 year goals and what you want to accomplish.
    16. Write down who your favorite teacher is and why.
    17. Write down what teacher you don’t like and why.
    18. Write down what excites you and what saddens you and how you can change each or would change them.
    19. Write down the type of Social Media content you create and share, is it positive, negative, can it come back to hurt you.
    20. Write down 5 self-perceptions of the type of person you are and have your parents and 3 friends write theirs about you and compare the results

    High school students need to understand that their junior and senior lives are under scrutiny, people are watching their personal decisions, who they are associated with; “guilt by association” and alliances. It is important for high school seniors to strategically place themselves where they can network to increase their visibility to others who have similar interests and goals and build their personal Brand. The hope of this blog is to help high school students and their parents understand that their activities and associations do matter. How they Brand themselves can earn scholarships, internships and employment. Stated by Senator Anthony “Tony” Hill at the Black Male College Explorers banquet 2014, “parents have a responsibility to stay involved in their children’s lives, they are held accountable for the successes or failures of their children in school and life.”

    In today’s society parental guidance is needed more and more. High school students and their parents should understand that societal perceptions, peer influences and judgments are influential in a young person’s life. A high school students’ reputation has several parts e-Reputation: e-Personality: Social Branding: e-Brand and the perceptions that people have in e-Perceptibility all play a strong part in the Branding of students. High school students need to ask themselves how do I perceive myself and how do others perceive me, this encourages areas to be addressed that need strengthening, modification, explanation and weaknesses transformed, just as importantly who to leave out of your life.

    Maya Angelou has an appropriate quote that can be shared with high school students, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” In this world of constant change, competitiveness, cultural diversity and lifestyle decisions high school students must leverage their greatest asset THEMSELVES in their Brand.

    This year I have spoken to high school seniors participating in Black Male College Explorers Program (Edward Waters College), Learn2Earn Experience (City of Jacksonville, Florida), Upward Bound, Boys and Girls Clubs Conferences (Keystone Leadership), Man Up for Health Summit, Preventing Crime in the Black Community through the Florida State Attorneys Office all with the focus of educating, engaging and inspiring high school students. There are collaborations and connections that seniors should associate themselves through volunteering in the community.


    William Jackson, M.Edu.
    Educational Technology
    Edward Waters College
    Jacksonville, Florida

    Blogging at: My Quest To Teach http://MyQuestToTeach.WordPress.com/
    Twitter: WmJackson Instagram: http://Instagram.com/WilliamDJackson


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    The Bridge Teen Summit Keeping Kids Safe Online Bridge Connection One Program

    William Jackson, M.Edu.


     Teen Summit Keeping Kids Safe Online


    Speaking about Social Media Safety and Etiquette and Prevention of Cyberbullying and Cyberstalking.

    The Bridge Teen Summit provided needed and transformative information to the middle and high school students attending, students contributed to the learning and sharing of information from their online experiences. Youth, teens and young adults need this type of engagement to empower them with knowledge and preparing them for the challenges of peer pressure, social exposure to sex, drugs and drinking, pornography online and the vital understanding of physical, psychological and hormonal changes that happen during puberty that Social Media does affect.

    Organizations like The Bridge of Northeast Florida, Inc. fill in the gaps of educational, social and community based learning opportunities that students may not receive at home or in school. The social interaction is important with youth, teens and young adults, they have the opportunity to share what they have learned and able to properly process the information and apply it to their future use.

    The Social Media workshop composed of teaching Social Media Safety and Etiquette, Cyberbullying and Cyberstalking prevention and engaged in discussion on Sexting and what should be done if online recruitment by ISSI or other extremist groups should happen.

    These are relevant subjects that youth, teens and young adults need to talk about and allowed to ask questions because of the potential in damaging a teens or young adults E-reputation that could harm them and keep them from scholarships, internships and even professional employment. There are dangers online that many do not realize until they are physically in danger.

    Summits provide the middle and high school students with factual information that provide them with skills that will last a lifetime and guide their educational journeys into higher education and professional life. Many of the conflicts, challenges and struggles that children, youth, teens and young adults face on Social Media can be addressed by education as Professor Jackson provides in his program that involves YouTube videos, interactive dialogue, role playing situations and teaching youth and teens how to apply their learning to real life where it matters. The stakes in keeping our children safe on Social Media are too important not to engage children, youth, teens and young adults in workshops like these.

    William Jackson is a national and international blogger that speaks at conferences, workshops, summits and in churches about Social Media Safety, Preventing Cyberbullying, Cyberstalking, Preventing Sexting and STEAM/STEM

    William Jackson, M.Ed.
    Blogger and Social Media Educator
    Speaker, Educator and Community Activist
    Blogging at: http://MyQuestToTeach.Wordpress.com
    About.me: http://About.me/WilliamDJackson
    Rebel Mouse: https://www.rebelmouse.com/wmjackson/


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    Schooled on Fat: What Teens Tell Us About Gender, Body Image, and Obesity


     Schooled on Fat: What Teens Tell Us About Gender, Body Image, and Obesity


    Routledge is pleased to introduce a timely book on an increasingly important cultural issue. Obesity has dominated popular media as one of the most pressing issues of the new millennium. In the US, high rates of obesity, and by extension, fat people are often blamed for rising health-care costs and a weakening of national security. What does it mean to be considered fat during a time when obesity is framed as a threat? When body fat is the enemy, how does the line between "acceptable" and "too fat" get defined moment-to-moment as people make value judgments about each other’s bodies in the course of everyday life?

    Nicole Taylor explores how teens navigate the fraught realities of body image within a high school culture that reinforces widespread beliefs about body size as a matter of personal responsibility while offering limited opportunity to exercise and an abundance of fattening junk foods. Drawing on daily observations, interviews, and focus groups with teens, Schooled on Fat takes the reader into their lives to show how, through everyday language, they manage their body size, social status, and identities as body-conscious individuals. Taylor traces policy efforts to illustrate where we are as a nation in addressing childhood obesity and offers practical strategies schools and parents can utilize to promote teen wellness.

    Schooled on Fat: What Teens Tell Us About Gender, Body Image, and Obesity
    By Nicole Taylor
    © 2016 – Routledge | 186 pages
    Paperback: 9781138924215
    Hardback: 9781138924208


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    Teen Leaders of America - Social Media Marketing and Branding


     Teen Leaders of America



    Having a serious discussion about Social Media with teens is becoming just as important as talking to them about sex, drugs, finances, driving and potential involvement with law enforcement. Youth, teens and young adults cannot be given free rein on the Internet without training, counseling and realistically behavioral expectations because of the potential of harmful content that may have serious effects on the mental, emotional and even physical conditions of our children.

    The Internet has grown in influence to where the content of people of all ages, backgrounds and genders are judged by the content they post, people will view the tweets, videos, pictures, Facebook posts and other content and make judgments on the type of person teens are. There may be influences that try to influence behaviors, alliances, and even change morals and values, involvement with gangs (foreign and domestic), extremist organizations (like ISSI), and pressure to Cyberbully and even involvement in Sexting.

    These dangers will have future consequences with teens seeking employment, entrance into higher education, military service and even establishing careers in the future. As I tell the youth I talk to “Social Media can be your best friend or worse enemy, when establishing your SWAG for careers and higher education.” William Jackson, M.Ed. Edward Waters College

    The workshop with Teen Leaders of America - Social Media Awareness workshop addressed teaching students of the positive and negative effects of Social Media; and educating those in attendance on how to use Social Media for Networking, Marketing and Brand development. Having a serious and at times humorous discussion about #SocialMedia, students are being held accountable and responsible for their #SocialMedia content by future employers, schools, law enforcement if there is an indication of Bullying/Cyberbullying, Sexting and involvement in criminal activity.

    Teen Leaders of America program is held at Edward Waters College the oldest Historically Black College (HBCU) in Jacksonville, Florida. William Jackson is a instructor at EWC teaching Educational Technology with a component of Social Media and STEAM.

    Teen Leaders of America was developed by Marcia Brown and more information about this engaging program can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/marcia.brown.376695?fref=ts


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    (BPRW) 21st Annual Search Under Way for Nation’s Top Youth Volunteers

    Volunteering as a teen can boost happiness and reduce stress, recent survey finds


    (BLACK PR WIRE) -- WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Over the past 20 years, Prudential Spirit of Community Awards have been given to more than 115,000 middle and high school students across the country for helping people in need, raising awareness of worthy causes, addressing needs in their hometowns and many other volunteer activities. Today, the search begins to identify thousands more young people who have made meaningful contributions to their communities over the past 12 months, as the awards program kicks off its 21st year.

    Now through November 3, students in grades 5-12 who volunteer are invited to apply for 2016 awards at http://spirit.prudential.com or at www.nassp.org/spirit.

    These awards, sponsored by Prudential Financial, Inc. in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), honor outstanding community service by middle level and high school students at the local, state and national level.

    A recent survey of 1,200 teens by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards revealed the virtuous cycle that young people encounter when they volunteer. Nine in 10 teens who volunteer said service makes them feel good about themselves, and that their participation leads to feeling needed (59 percent), feeling happier and less stressed (59 percent), and feeling more connected to people (54 percent). Compared to teenagers who did not volunteer, volunteers rated themselves an average of 15 points higher across a variety of traits, including independence, leadership, dependability, confidence and optimism.

    The survey, which measured the attitudes of U.S. teenagers toward volunteering, was conducted this year in support of The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards’ mission to promote volunteerism amongst middle and high school students. Compared to 20 years ago, when Prudential first surveyed teenagers about their attitudes toward volunteering, the number of teens who see volunteering as important has increased from 62 percent to 76 percent.

    “The feeling of knowing that you truly have a hand in doing something that helps someone else…is great for your spirit,” one survey respondent said.

    Applications for 2016 awards must be completed by November 3, 2015, and then submitted to a middle or high school principal, Girl Scout council, county 4-H agent, American Red Cross chapter, YMCA or HandsOn Network affiliate. Paper versions of the application form are available by calling (877) 525-8491.

    Participating schools and local organizations will select Local Honorees in early November and present them with Certificates of Achievement. These Local Honorees also will receive the President’s Volunteer Service Award if they have contributed the minimum number of volunteer hours to qualify (26 hours for age 10 and younger, 50 hours for ages 11-15 and 100 hours for older students). All Local Honorees are then reviewed by a state-level judging committee, which will name the top two candidates from each state and the District of Columbia – one high school student and one middle level student – as State Honorees on February 9, 2016. These State Honorees will receive $1,000 awards, engraved silver medallions, and an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., with a parent for four days of recognition events April 30-May 3, 2016. Runners-up at the state level will receive bronze medallions or Certificates of Excellence.

    In Washington, a distinguished national selection committee will name 10 of the 102 State Honorees as America’s top youth volunteers of 2016. These National Honorees will receive $5,000, gold medallions, crystal trophies for their nominating schools or organizations, and $5,000 grants from The Prudential Foundation for nonprofit charitable organizations of their choice.

    “Every year for the past 20 years, we’ve been inspired by the stories of service we’ve heard from young people across the United States,” said Prudential Chairman and CEO John Strangfeld. “We look forward to honoring the top youth volunteers of 2016, and hope their example will inspire others to serve their communities, too.”

    “Middle and high school students nationwide are making their mark on their communities through volunteer service,” said JoAnn Bartoletti, executive director of NASSP. “We are honored to celebrate their initiative, their dedication, and the powerful example they’ve set for their peers.”

    The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards represent the United States’ largest youth recognition program based solely on volunteer service. The awards program also is conducted in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Ireland, India, China and Brazil, where Prudential has significant business operations.

    The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for middle level and high school principals, assistant principals, and school leaders from across the United States and 35 countries around the world. The association connects and engages school leaders through advocacy, research, education, and student programs. NASSP advocates on behalf of all school leaders to ensure the success of each student and strengthens school leadership practices through the design and delivery of high-quality professional learning experiences. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Association of Student Councils. For more information about NASSP, located in Reston, VA, visit www.nassp.org.

    Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU), a financial services leader, has operations in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Prudential’s diverse and talented employees are committed to helping individual and institutional customers grow and protect their wealth through a variety of products and services, including life insurance, annuities, retirement-related services, mutual funds and investment management. In the U.S., Prudential’s iconic Rock symbol has stood for strength, stability, expertise and innovation for more than a century. For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com


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     Prudential Spirit of Community Awards

    (BPRW) America’s Top 10 Youth Volunteers of 2015 Named at 20th Annual Prudential Spirit of Community Awards

    Good Morning America” co-anchor Robin Roberts pays tribute to outstanding middle level and high school volunteers


     Prudential Spirit of Community Awards
    "Good Morning America" co-anchor Robin Roberts pays tribute to the 2015 Prudential Spirit of Community Award honorees in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Zach Harrison Photography)


    (BLACK PR WIRE) --WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--For community service initiatives that range from supporting families of U.S. soldiers to helping children with cancer, 10 students were named America’s top youth volunteers of 2015 today by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, a national program sponsored by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP).

    These National Honorees, named during the program’s 20th annual national award ceremony at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, range in age from 12 to 18. They were selected first from a field of more than 33,000 middle level and high school youth volunteers nationwide, and then from 102 State Honorees, based on their initiative, effort, impact, and the personal growth demonstrated in the course of their volunteer service. The National Honorees each received $5,000 personal awards, engraved gold medallions, crystal trophies for their schools, and $5,000 grants from The Prudential Foundation for charities of their choice.

    Today’s ceremony was part of a four-day celebration that brought each state’s top two youth volunteers of 2015 to Washington, D.C., for sightseeing and special recognition events. These State Honorees – one middle level and one high school student from each state and the District of Columbia – were personally congratulated by “Good Morning America” co-anchor Robin Roberts last night at a gala dinner reception at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Each State Honoree received a $1,000 award.

    These are the 10 National Honorees named today:

    Jake Gallin, 13, of New Rochelle, N.Y., a seventh-grader at Albert Leonard Middle School, founded an organization called “Stars for Cars” and has raised more than $12,000 for the United Service Organization (USO) by selling star-shaped magnetic car decals that honor families of soldiers who have served in the U.S. armed forces.

    Raghav Ganesh, 13, of San Jose, Calif., a seventh-grader at Joaquin Miller Middle School, designed and built a device that uses sensors to detect objects beyond the reach of the white canes used by many visually impaired people.

    Carolina Gonzalez, 18, of Coral Gables, Fla., a senior at Our Lady of Lourdes Academy in Miami, started a nonprofit organization that has helped more than 500 undocumented young immigrants apply for temporary residence and employment in the U.S. under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and has raised more than $22,000 to pay the application fees of those who cannot afford them.

    Eric Li, 14, of Manvel, Texas, an eighth-grader at Pearland Junior High West, founded a nonprofit organization with his siblings that has collected nearly $200,000 in cash and in-kind donations to help children around the world recover from major disasters.

    Arturo (AJ) Mattia, 15, of Turnersville, N.J., a freshman at Holy Cross Academy, survived bone cancer and a leg amputation to become a prominent champion for pediatric cancer awareness and fundraising.

    Morlan Osgood, 16, of Loveland, Ohio, a junior at Loveland High School, co-founded an educational program that has helped more than 14,000 students in grades 2-12 develop their interest and skills in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and math) through summer camps, after-school classes, conference workshops and other activities.

    Samantha Petersen, 18, of South Windsor, Conn., a home-schooled senior, founded a nonprofit organization that disseminates information about scoliosis, screens children in low-income communities for the disease, and offers emotional support to those undergoing corrective surgery.

    Elizabeth Quesenberry, 17, of Wilmington, Del., a senior at Padua Academy High School, overcame a diagnosis of brain cancer to start a nonprofit organization that has raised $100,000 over the past six years to increase awareness of childhood cancer, help fund the search for a cure, and ease the financial pressure on families of young cancer patients.

    Carter Ries, 14, of Fayetteville, Ga., an eighth-grader at Konos Academy, created a weeklong educational curriculum with his younger sister that is teaching kids about the importance of reducing plastic pollution.

    Caleb White, 12, of Commerce Township, Mich., a seventh-grader at Clifford H. Smart Middle School, hands out boxes of food, toiletries and warm garments to the homeless on the streets of Detroit each year during the Christmas season, and last August threw a back-to-school party that provided 800 children in need with backpacks stuffed with new school supplies.

    “As we celebrate the 20th anniversary of The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, we are delighted to recognize the 2015 honorees for their exemplary volunteer service,” said John Strangfeld, chairman and CEO of Prudential Financial, Inc. “These young people have demonstrated leadership, compassion and perseverance, and we look forward to seeing all they accomplish in the future.”

    “These honorees represent the best of what America’s youth have to offer,” said G.A. Buie, president of NASSP. “They have set a powerful example for their peers by proving that one young person really can make a difference, and it is a privilege to shine a spotlight on their good works.”

    The distinguished selection committee that chose the National Honorees was chaired by Strangfeld and included Buie of NASSP; Andrea Bastiani Archibald, chief girl expert for Girl Scouts of the USA; Robert Bisi, senior public affairs manager for the Corporation for National and Community Service; Tracy Hoover, president of Points of Light; Reneé Jackson, senior manager of education programs at the National PTA; Maxine Margaritis, vice president of volunteer services for the American Red Cross; Delia Pompa, senior vice president for programs at the National Council of La Raza; Jennifer Sirangelo, president and CEO of the National 4-H Council; Dru Tomlin, director of middle level services for the Association for Middle Level Education; Kevin Washington, president and CEO of YMCA of the USA; and two 2014 National Honorees: Sean Egan of Staten Island, N.Y., a freshman at the University of Pennsylvania, and Kinsey Morrison of Goshen, Ky., a freshman at Stanford University.

    The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards was created in 1995 to identify and recognize young people for outstanding volunteer service – and, in so doing, inspire others to volunteer, too. In the past 20 years, the program has honored more than 100,000 young volunteers at the local, state and national level.

    For more information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards and this year’s honorees, visit http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit.

    About NASSP
    The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for middle level and high school principals, assistant principals, and school leaders from across the United States and 35 countries around the world. The association connects and engages school leaders through advocacy, research, education, and student programs. NASSP advocates on behalf of all school leaders to ensure the success of each student and strengthens school leadership practices through the design and delivery of high-quality professional learning experiences. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Association of Student Councils. For more information about NASSP, located in Reston, VA, visit www.nassp.org.

    About Prudential Financial
    Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU), a financial services leader, has operations in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Prudential’s diverse and talented employees are committed to helping individual and institutional customers grow and protect their wealth through a variety of products and services, including life insurance, annuities, retirement-related services, mutual funds and investment management. In the U.S., Prudential’s iconic Rock symbol has stood for strength, stability, expertise and innovation for more than a century. For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com.


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    McDonald’s USA Recognizes Excellence Amongst Teen Leaders with Second Annual Community Choice Youth Award

    Two recipients will be honored during the 12th annual McDonald’s 365Black Awards ceremony in New Orleans on July 3


     McDonald’s 365Black Awards



    OAK BROOK, Ill. (April 27, 2015) – Business men and women aren’t the only ones who can impact the community. For the second consecutive year, McDonald’s USA is calling on communities nationwide to nominate this year’s 365Black Community Choice Youth Award recipients. Now through May 31, consumers can visit www.365Black.com to nominate a teen who has exemplified exceptional leadership in their communities. One male and one female recipient will each receive a $10,000 scholarship and will be honored alongside celebrities, philanthropists and influencers at the 12th annual McDonald's 365Black Awards, slated to take place in New Orleans during the21st annual ESSENCE Festival® presented by Coca-Cola®.

    Open to young people between the ages 13-18, the McDonald’s 365Black Community Choice Youth Award honors teens who make a difference within their communities through vision, compassion and diligence. In addition to completing the entry form, nominators must also answer three questions about the nominee, as well as submit a three-minute video highlighting his or her contribution to the community. All entries must be received by 11:59 p.m. CT on May 31, 2015.

    “At McDonald’s, we are committed to uplifting our youth and recognizing their achievements. We take great pride in working with neighborhoods across the country to find young, shining stars in our communities,” said William Rhodes, McDonald’s U.S. marketing director. “We applaud the achievements of future leaders and are honored to give them a platform of recognition.”

    Last year’s winners were Gabrielle Jordan Williams and Skyler Grey, both 15 years old. Williams is a professional motivational speaker, owner of Jewelz of Jordan and is a #1 best-selling author. Grey, an urban artist and philanthropist, discovered art as therapy after losing his mother at an early age. He makes it a point to donate his work to various art programs across the nation and gives 10 percent of each of his sales to charities.

    The Community Choice Youth Award aligns with the goals of McDonald’s 365Black Awards, which salutes outstanding individuals who are committed to making positive contributions that strengthen the African-American community.

    McDonald’s 365Black Awards launched in 2003 as an extension of the company’s 365Black platform, which celebrates the pride, heritage and achievements of African-Americans year-round. To learn more about the Community Choice Youth Award, please visit www.365Black.com and follow @365Black on Twitter, using the hashtag #365BlackAwards.

    ###


    ABOUT MCDONALD’S USA
    McDonald's USA, LLC, serves a variety of menu options made with quality ingredients to approximately 27 million customers every day. Nearly 90 percent of McDonald's 14,000 U.S. restaurants are independently owned and operated by businessmen and women. Customers can now log online for free at approximately 11,500 participating Wi-Fi enabled McDonald's U.S. restaurants. For more information, visit www.mcdonalds.com, or follow us on Twitter @365Black and Facebook www.facebook.com/mcdonalds. To learn more about the 365Black initiative, visit www.365Black.com.


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    Al Jazeera America Presents “Edge of Eighteen,” A New Original Documentary Series From Oscar®-Winning Filmmaker Alex Gibney

    Series to Premiere Sunday, September 7th at 9pm ET/6pm PT
    Find Al Jazeera America near you: www.aljazeera.com/getajam


    NEW YORK, NY, August 13, 2014 – This September, 15 high school seniors from around the U.S. will reveal themselves in raw, immediate, and unfiltered first-person accounts of their lives, the world around them and the American education system on “Edge of Eighteen.” The new six-episode series premieres Sunday, September 7th at 9pm ET/6pm PT, with six hour-long original episodes airing Sunday evenings through October. For more, visit: aljazeera.com/edgeofeighteen

    “Edge of Eighteen” is a provocative, in-depth documentary series that offers a portrait of life as a teenager in America – filmed by the students themselves. The result is a more sprawling and intimate portrait of the selfie generation than has ever appeared on television. Produced by Jigsaw Productions, home to Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney (“Taxi to the Dark Side,” “The Armstrong Lie”), this series is told through a narrative arc of the students’ lives and raises fundamental question about America’s educational system.

    “There’s a lot of conversation about kids in America, but we don’t always get to see the world through their eyes,” said executive producer Alex Gibney. “For this series, 15 courageous kids filmed themselves, their friends, their schools and their communities. In return, we get a surprising, uncensored look at the challenges facing youth in America.”

    “Students around the U.S. contributed to this show and let us go inside their worlds at a pivotal moment in their education,” said Shannon High-Bassalik, SVP for documentaries and programming, Al Jazeera America. “‘Edge of Eighteen’ shows the educational issues kids face and how their personal lives tie into their ability to make decisions about their future. Today’s kids are making some very adult decisions.”

    When the school year began, “Edge of Eighteen” producers sent out a call for 17 and 18-year-old students willing to document their lives from the start of 2014 until their high school graduations. The selected students came to New York for a crash course in documentary filmmaking from Alex Gibney, director Alexandra Pelosi (“Journeys with George”) and director/editor Sam Pollard (“When the Levees Broke”). Each student received Canon XA10 cameras, tripods, microphones and other essential gear and learned storytelling, interviewing skills, cinematography, sound recording, and editing. Then the students returned home to tell their own stories, honest portrayals of their lives, by documenting events and doing weekly video diaries and interviews with parents, teachers, and other people important in their lives. Professional producers shuttled among the students, often filming alongside them and working with them to hone their stories. The content of these stories was always up to the students themselves.

    “Edge of Eighteen” features students from diverse geographic, racial, economic and religious backgrounds for a revealing look at life in America for young people. The series compellingly illustrates the ultra-competitive environment that today’s teens are forced to navigate, with tuition costs alarmingly out of reach and college sensitivity at an all-time high. Viewers are also privy to an array of issues confronted by these teens including gay rights, religious freedom, inner city violence, teen pregnancy, bullying, the impact of divorce, education budget cuts, the college admission process and the role of military service are all explored in a fly-on-the-wall manner that makes these issues spring to life.

    Each episode follows three students whose stories are intercut, allowing viewers to follow their career goals, passion for family and friends, and their desire to make a difference in their community. The series provides a unique view inside America’s education system and unveils a variety of experiences facing students today.

    “Edge of Eighteen” is executive produced by Alex Gibney, Dave Snyder and Amy Kohn for Jigsaw Productions.

    Al Jazeera America’s award-winning documentary strand, airing Sunday nights at 9pm ET/6pm PT, brings viewers feature documentaries and original series by acclaimed filmmakers around the globe. Past documentary series include “The System with Joe Berlinger,” by acclaimed filmmaker Joe Berlinger, and “Borderland,” which covered immigration issues in the U.S.

    Al Jazeera America is now available in over 60 million homes nationwide. Distributors include DirecTV, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, DISH, AT&T U-verse, Verizon FiOS and Bright House Networks, among others. To find Al Jazeera America in your area, visit www.aljazeera.com/getajam.

    About Al Jazeera America
    Al Jazeera America is the new U.S. news channel that provides both domestic and international news for American audiences. It is headquartered in New York City with bureaus in 12 cities across the United States.

    Visit Al Jazeera America online at http://www.aljazeera.com/america for the latest updates.You can also like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/aljazeeraamerica, follow us on Twitter @AJAM (www.twitter.com/ajam) and join the conversation using #AlJazeeraAmerica.

    About Jigsaw Productions
    Jigsaw Productions is home to director Alex Gibney, one of the most important and provocative documentary filmmakers working today. As such, the company has produced some of the most acclaimed documentary films in recent years, including the Academy Award-winning “Taxi to the Dark Side,” the Oscar-nominated “Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room,” the multiple Emmy Award-winning “Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God,” Showtime’s Emmy-winning “History of the Eagles,” and the Sundance-premiering “We Steal Secrets: The Story of Wikileaks." “Finding Fela," a film about Nigerian Afrobeat musician and activist Fela Kuti, is in select theaters now. Upcoming projects include a four-hour documentary about Frank Sinatra for HBO.




    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
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    (BPRW) 20th Annual Search Under Way for Nation’s Top Youth Volunteers

    Awards Program Honors Students in Grades 5-12 for Outstanding Volunteer Service


    (BLACK PR WIRE) – WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Over the past 19 years, Prudential Spirit of Community Awards have been given to more than 100,000 middle and high school students across the country for helping the less fortunate, promoting health and safety, protecting the environment, and serving their communities through many other volunteer activities. Today, the search begins to identify thousands more who have made meaningful contributions to their communities over the past 12 months, as the awards program kicks off its 20th year.

    These awards, sponsored by Prudential Financial, Inc. in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), honor outstanding community service by students in grades 5 through 12 at the local, state and national level.

    “Prudential is proud to recognize young people who contribute to the well-being of their communities through volunteer service,” said Prudential Chairman and CEO John Strangfeld. “We look forward to honoring the nation’s top youth volunteers of 2015, and hope their stories will inspire others to consider how they can serve their communities.”

    Young volunteers can apply online at http://spirit.prudential.com or at www.nassp.org/spirit. Applications must be completed by November 4, 2014, and then submitted to a middle or high school principal, Girl Scout council, county 4-H agent, American Red Cross chapter, YMCA or HandsOn Network affiliate. Paper versions of the application form are available by calling (877) 525-8491.

    Participating schools and local organizations will select Local Honorees in early November and present them with Certificates of Achievement. These Local Honorees also will receive the President’s Volunteer Service Award if they have contributed the minimum number of volunteer hours to qualify (50 hours for age 14 and younger, 100 hours for those older). All Local Honorees are then reviewed by a state-level judging committee, which will name the top two candidates from each state and the District of Columbia – one high school student and one middle level student – as State Honorees on February 10, 2015. These State Honorees will receive $1,000 awards, engraved silver medallions, and an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., with a parent for four days of recognition events May 2-5, 2015. Runners-up at the state level will receive bronze medallions or Certificates of Excellence.

    In Washington, a distinguished national selection committee will name 10 of the 102 State Honorees as America’s top youth volunteers of 2015. These National Honorees will receive $5,000, gold medallions, crystal trophies for their nominating schools or organizations, and $5,000 grants from The Prudential Foundation for nonprofit charitable organizations of their choice.

    “Across the United States, middle level and high school-aged volunteers are changing their communities for the better,” said JoAnn Bartoletti, executive director of NASSP. “We are honored to celebrate the contributions of these young leaders.”

    The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards represent the United States’ largest youth recognition program based solely on volunteer service. The awards program also is conducted in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Ireland, India and China, where Prudential has significant business operations.

    The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) is the leading organization of and voice for middle level and high school principals, assistant principals, and school leaders from across the United States and 35 countries around the world. The association connects and engages school leaders through advocacy, research, education, and student programs. NASSP advocates on behalf of all school leaders to ensure the success of each student and strengthens school leadership practices through the design and delivery of high quality professional learning experiences. Reflecting its long-standing commitment to student leadership development, NASSP administers the National Honor Society, National Junior Honor Society, National Elementary Honor Society, and National Association of Student Councils. For more information about NASSP, located in Reston, VA, visit www.nassp.org.

    Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE:PRU), a financial services leader, has operations in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Prudential’s diverse and talented employees are committed to helping individual and institutional customers grow and protect their wealth through a variety of products and services, including life insurance, annuities, retirement-related services, mutual funds and investment management. In the U.S., Prudential’s iconic Rock symbol has stood for strength, stability, expertise and innovation for more than a century. For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com.

    Source: Prudential Financial, Inc.


    ooOoo


    Disclaimer:
    The articles on this website are provided as a community service for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the above article content. Use this information with caution and at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness.







good quality websites













 
- BLACK / AFRICAN AMERICAN TEENS - TEENAGERS -
     





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  1. African American Teenagers, Minimum Wage...
    The following chart demonstrates that right as the welfare transition was occurring, remarkable changes were taking place in the black male labor market.

  2. African American Teen Fiction...
    Discount African American Books and DVDs. BlackBooksDirect.com offers African American fiction and literature, African American children's books, African American cookbooks, biographies of African Americans. African American owned.

  3. African-American Teens Portal...
    A complete resources, entertainment, history, black studies and interactive web portal for African-American, Black youth, from Streetcats Foundation for Youth.

  4. African American Teen Unemployment...
    African American Teen Unemployment: A Growing Problem.

  5. Afro-Netizen...
    Soda may pose higher hypertension risk to Black teens.

  6. Afro Puffs and Ponytails...
    An e-world that inspires and promotes African American-Black preteen and teen girls. Resources for African American parents.

  7. American Bandstand History...
    Author: ‘American Bandstand’ blocked black teens from the show.

  8. Ashay By The Bay...
    African American Children's Books (Pre School to High School) and educational products online. Quality affordable African American Children's books at discounted pricing.

  9. Bill Cosby & Black Teens...
    Bill Cosby speaks bluntly to students at Richmond's mostly black public schools, urging them to dedicate themselves to graduation, not gangs, and to control anger that threatens to derail their dreams.

  10. Black People - Black Teenagers - Teenz Exprezzed!...
    We are blessed to have many teenagers in the Family ... and they asked for their own forum ... so here yall go!

  11. Black Teens & Asthma ...
    Black teen-agers are three times more likely than white teen-agers to have steroid resistant asthma, research at National Jewish Medical and Research Center has found.

  12. Black Teens & Booze...
    Booze ads target black teens, report finds.

  13. Black Teens & Employment...
    For Black teens, jobs crisis worsens.

  14. Black Women Speak...
    Blog for African American and Black women. Discuss Black relationships, black teens, black hair, black health, black politics and more!

  15. Common Dreams NewsCenter...
    Presumably, black teenagers being unemployed at nearly six times the national rate isn’t newsworthy to such papers. Unless, of course, a voice for power and wealth can score points by distorting America’s social reality.

  16. Depression Linked To Subsequent Pregnancy In Black Teens...
    African American adolescent mothers who have symptoms of depression may be more likely to have a subsequent pregnancy within two years of giving birth, according to a new report.

  17. Eating Disorders Begin to Plague Black Teens...
    tar Jones and Oprah Winfrey embody the cultural tug-of-war faced by African-American teen girls. Recent studies indicate that they too are becoming more vulnerable to the cult of thinness and its accompanying health hazards.

  18. Goddess Magazine ...
    Goddess Magazine is a bi-monthly lifestyle magazine for teen girls. We feature teens in each issue and allow them to share their challenges, dreams, and aspirations in hopes of giving inspirations/advice to our readers. Along with our teen features, we also feature health, entertainment, fashion, and beauty articles.

  19. Great Civil War Resources for K-12 Students ...
    General Resources For Elementary School Students, For Middle School Students, For High School Students, For Teachers and Additional Museums and Archives.

  20. Gumbo for the Soul...
    Gumbo for the Soul: supporting literacy in the Black community.

  21. Job Search USA ...
    Job Search USA provides job listings from around the united states. Job seekers may choose to search by industry, city or state. They may also post there resume free to your database.

  22. Juju.com...
    Juju.com, a search engine for jobs covering millions of jobs from thousands of job boards and corporate career sites.

  23. Lip Gloss Teen Magazine...
    Lip Gloss Teen Magazine is a new online lifestyle magazine for minority girls, ages 13-21. We are chic, stylish and devoted to the empowerment of young women of color.

  24. Mail Online...
    Black boys must be encouraged to stop idolising rap stars and footballers if they are to be steered away from the gang and gun culture, it has been suggested. A report says African-Caribbean teenagers often aspire to the lifestyles of such celebrities.

  25. Multiple Shades of You Online...
    MSOY for short is an eZine designed for young women of color ages 5-25, but all are welcome. The site features articles, links, images, clipart, and so much more.

  26. National Black TEEN Empowerment ...
    All our teenagers are stars, simply seeking ways to shine. And if we help them fly, many of them will soar.

  27. Professional Development...
    Staff Training for Youth Service Professionals: Teachers, coaches, counselors, social workers, youth ministers and police.

  28. Project Success Inc...
    Project Success: is a year round education outreach program for youth and families. Our students range in grades from K-7 and represent a broad cross-section of the community.

  29. Saving Our Children ...
    Making the African American community aware of our missing and murdered children.

  30. Schooling Experience...
    African-American Teens Discuss Their Schooling Experience.

  31. Teen Advocate Shares Views on Black Teens and Sex...
    Teen Advocate Shares Views on Black Teens and Sex article.

  32. Tenn Pressure...
    Article about 'Is Your Teen Under Pressure?'

  33. The Black Parenting Blog...
    Helping Black parents is the key to helping black families. This is why Black Parenting Blog aims to keep African American families up to date on the latest websites, books, and news for black parents, children, and teens.

  34. We Animate Character.com...
    Developing and providing multimedia character education films and other products with the ultimate goal is to educate youth in the importance of character and its development.

  35. Weep Me Not ...
    Living In My Father's Dream Weep Me Not a.k.a. The Tears of God

  36. Young Actors Camp...
    A look into the Hollywood industry in the form of a whimsical acting camp for ages 7 - 17.

  37. Young Black Starz ...
    Supporting the Young, Black and Famous.

  38. 47% of Black Teens Write Diary...
    Black teens are more likely than whites to write in a journal and to write music or lyrics in their personal time. 47% of black teens have written in a personal journal in the past year, and 37% have written music or lyrics.

  39. 100 Black Men...
    100 Black Men is part of the tutoring and mentoring provided by 100 Black Men of Western Pennsylvania, a professional men's civic organization.


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1 in 10 new mothers is a teen. CDC Vital Signs™: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns










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