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    BLACK WOMEN EXPRESS MORE INTEREST IN STEM MAJORS THAN WHITE WOMEN, BUT EARN FEWER STEM DEGREES, STUDY FINDS

    Blacks less likely than whites to view STEM fields as masculine, research shows


    WASHINGTON - Black women are more likely than white women to express interest in majoring in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) fields when they enter college, but they are actually less likely to earn degrees in these fields, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

    " If black women start out in college more interested in STEM than white women, but are less likely to complete college with a STEM degree, this suggests that black women may face unique barriers, such as race-based stereotypes "
    Black men and women are also less likely than whites to subconsciously consider STEM fields more masculine, according to the article, published online in the APA journal Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology.

    "Compared to white women, black women are less likely to hold gender-based stereotypes of STEM fields and, therefore, may be more likely to participate in these majors," said the study's lead author, Laurie O'Brien, PhD, of Tulane University.

    The authors analyzed data from 1,772,133 college freshmen (56 percent female) who participated in the Cooperative Institute Freshman Survey between 1990 and 1999. They observed that 23 percent of black women said they planned to major in STEM fields compared to 16 percent of white women. Among men, 37 percent of blacks said they intended to major in STEM, compared to 34 percent of white men.

    The authors noted that this sample was dated and thus conducted three studies surveying a total of 1,108 students at several universities across the United States.

    In one of these studies, the researchers surveyed 838 college students (212 black) between the ages of 18 and 56 at four universities -- one private, primarily white university in the South; one public, primarily white university in the Midwest; one private, historically black university in the South; and an ethnically diverse public university in the West. In this sample, 38 percent of black women had declared a major in a STEM field, whereas only 19 percent of white women had. Black women at the historically black university were more likely to participate in STEM majors than those at the other institutions. There were no significant differences between black and white men's enrollment in STEM majors.

    In addition to asking about the students' majors, the researchers conducted tests to examine participants' subconscious beliefs about STEM fields being associated mostly with men. For example, the participants saw STEM-related words (e.g., astronomy, biology, math) or liberal arts-related words (e.g., arts, English, literature) flash on a computer screen and had to quickly categorize them with words related to men (e.g., boy, father, man) or women (e.g., girl, mother, woman). By examining participants' response times, these procedures measure a person's implicit, or subconscious, beliefs. Results indicated that regardless of their major or the type of university they attended, black women and men were less likely than white women and men to associate STEM fields with more masculine words.

    However, among women who earned undergraduate degrees in 2010, only 8 percent of black women earned degrees in a STEM field, compared to 10 percent of white women, according to the National Science Foundation.

    "If black women start out in college more interested in STEM than white women, but are less likely to complete college with a STEM degree, this suggests that black women may face unique barriers, such as race-based stereotypes," said O'Brien. "These stereotypes may have more of a negative effect on black women than gender-based stereotype and should be studied further."

    The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA's membership includes nearly 130,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives.

    Article: "Ethnic Variation in Gender-STEM Stereotypes and STEM Participation: An Intersectional Approach," Laurie O'Brien, PhD, Tulane University; Alison Blodorn, PhD, University of California Santa Barbara; Glenn Adams, PhD, University of Kansas; Donna Garcia, PhD, California State University, San Bernardino; Elliott Hammer, PhD, Xavier University of Louisiana, online Sept. 22, 2014, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology.

    http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/cdp-a0037944.pdf


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    Statement from Rashad Robinson, Executive Director of ColorOfChange.org, on The Supreme Court Decision On Hobby Lobby

    “Today, The Supreme Court gutted women’s right to birth control coverage under the Affordable Care Act. This is devastating news for the 51% of Black women ages 18-35 for whom high cost has made it difficult to maintain consistent access to birth control. Now health decisions, for women who work at certain private corporations, are left to their bosses.

    This unacceptable reality can only be changed if, this November, we show Congress and politicians that we won't stand for this — and that if they don't drop the attacks on our health care, we'll drop them. In 2013, Black women made the difference in the Virginia Governor's race, blocking Tea Party darling Ken Cuccinelli and his extreme attacks on women's health.As politicians decide how to respond to this decision, they need to know Black women support affordable access to birth control.

    This case is part of a nationwide assault on Obamacare. Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, Republican Governors and legislatures across the country have blocked Medicaid expansion denying millions of low-income people access to affordable, quality healthcare. ”

    With over 900,000 members, ColorOfChange.org is the nation’s largest online civil rights organization.

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    REAL WATER

    - REAL WATER PARTNERS WITH GLOBAL POP-SUPERSTAR AND AMERICA’S GOT TALENT JUDGE MEL B TO LAUNCH A LIMITED EDITION PINK BOTTLE THAT WILL BENEFIT SUSAN G. KOMEN®

    “Get Real…Get Pink” with Real Water’s limited edition pink bottle on store shelves in October! -


    Real Water
    Las Vegas, NV – Real Water is pleased to announce a major venture with one of its brand ambassadors and partners, America’s Got Talent (AGT) Judge and global pop-superstar, Mel B. Mel B has partnered with Real Water to benefit Susan G. Komen®. Together they have designed a limited edition pink bottle in support of Komen’s mission to save lives and end breast cancer forever.

    Mel B., who released a new single, “For Once In My Life” on September 19, may be best known in the music world as “Scary Spice” of the Spice Girls. She is also an author, fashion leader, television personality, philanthropist, entrepreneur and mom to four daughters. Her TV work includes “Dancing With the Stars” (2007), and currently the hit NBC show “America’s Got Talent,” joining fellow judges Howard Stern, Howie Mandel, Heidi Klum and host Nick Cannon. She will return in 2014 for another AGT season. Additionally, for the last two years she has been a judge on “The X Factor,” (Australia).

    “I am so excited to be working with Real Water– a brand I adore- to support the work of Susan G. Komen – a cause I am truly passionate about. The limited edition pink bottle is eye-catching and its tie to this important work is one more reason to buy Real Water. Every case purchased from now through 2014 will help support Komen’s mission. Many families and their loved ones are affected by breast cancer and it’s a cause that I am committed to,” says Mel B.

    Real Water’s blue bottle will “Go Pink” with the limited edition pink bottle and cap featuring Mel B on the front label and personal message to consumers explaining her passion for Real Water and desire to support Komen’s mission. From October 1, 2013 – December 31, 2014, Real Water will donate to Komen $.60 for each specially marked case of Real Water sold.

    Mel B.
    Real Water’s President Brent Jones tells us “Real Water is thrilled to work with Mel B to support Komen on their mission to end breast cancer. We strive to provide the healthiest water available and promote good health so this is a perfect fit. We can’t think of a better cause.”

    Real Water’s corporate office is located in Las Vegas, Nevada with an additional bottling plant in Tennessee. Real Water is beyond alkalinity, it’s infused with negative ions using their proprietary E² Technology. E² stands for Electron Energized and that is what the E² Technology does, it adds electrons to the water through electrical restructuring creating alkaline, stable negative ionized water that acts as an antioxidant and hydrates the body very well on a cellular level. No other bottled water has stable negative ionization. This sets Real Water apart from other alkaline bottled waters. The company distributes nationwide and is well established on the West Coast and sold in many chains including Whole Foods, Basha’s, Smiths, and Publix. Real Water is also available online www.DrinkRealWater.com

    “We are so excited to have Real Water and Mel B bring attention to this important work,” said Dorothy Jones, vice president of marketing at Komen. “Funds raised through these limited edition Real Water pink bottles will make a real difference in the lives of women and men facing breast cancer.”

    About Susan G. Komen®
    Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Suzy, she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer. Today, Susan G. Komen® works to end breast cancer in the U.S. and throughout the world by investing more than $790 million in breast cancer research and $1.5 billion in community outreach programs over the past 30 years; providing funding to help low-income and uninsured women get screened and get treatment; advocating for cancer research and outreach programs; and working globally in more than 30 countries. Visit komen.org. Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter. *While the health benefits of hydration are well-documented, Susan G. Komen has not verified the specific benefits of alkaline water in breast cancer risk reduction.


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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    Treatment for Fibroids - Uterine Fibroid Embolization - Fibroid Treatment Collective

    Obstetrician-gynecologist Dr. Bruce McLucas, whose goal is to inform women everywhere that in most cases, those affected by fibroids do not need a hysterectomy, there are options. 80% of African American women are at some point suffer by fibroids and Dr. McLucas is the country’s leading expert who founded The Los Angeles Fibroid Treatment Collective, a unique medical group devoted solely to treating women who suffer from uterine fibroids with an emphasis on fibroid embolization, a non-surgical technique that Dr. McLucas pioneered and introduced over a decade ago.

    Dr. McLucas is responsible for thousands of successful treatments, and he actively trains other physicians across the country to perform this safe, minimally invasive procedure designed to allow many women to avoid surgery and find permanent relief from uterine fibroids. Dr. McLucas gives an engaging interview and has been featured on “The Doctors,” the FOX11 Morning Show in LA and NBC News.

    Treatment for Fibroids
    The big hook is that in the U.S., it's estimated that up to 80% of African Americans will develop fibroids at some point by age 50. I’ve included 3 story ideas below that Dr. Bruce McLucas can discuss:

    1.) FERTILITY: Dr. Bruce McLucas’ goal is to inform women that fibroid embolization is the best option to treat fibroids while protecting a women’s fertility, since so many women needlessly undergo hysterectomy and myomectomy procedures. Dr. McLucas can discuss a case study following a patient who is deeply concerned about her fertility when dealing with her fibroids and can address how embolization protects fertility while following the patient throughout the consultation and procedure. Also available for a phone interview is a patient who had undergone the procedure and had a baby following the procedure.

    2.) COST OF PROCEDURE: With the affordable healthcare act dominating the news, Dr. McLucas can discuss how fibroid embolization can save literally billions of dollars. When hospital costs and time off work (typically 6 weeks) are added up following hysterectomy and myomectomy operations, the cost adds up to 40 billion dollars every year. Embolization is the safe, non-surgical alternative that requires no hospital stay and the patient can return to work the next day which will lower healthcare costs considerably.

    3.) FAILURE RATE: A segment can delve in deeper to a recent Yahoo Health article that reports the failure rate between embolization and myomectomy procedures. The study cites that 23% of women who had a myomectomy needed a repeat procedure, while only 6% of Dr. McLucas embolization patients had a recurrence. Dr. McLucas can explain the difference between the 3 options to treat fibroids (embolization, myomectomy and hysterectomy) and the advantages of embolization.

    Additional information on fibroids can be found on Dr. McLucas’ website, http://www.fibroids.com/

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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.



    5 Things Young African American Women Can Do To Cope with Breast Cancer Author: Zekita

    Learning that you have breast cancer can be one of the most shocking and life altering moments of your entire life. The initial diagnosis can bring on feelings of not only worry, but life’s fragility. The idea of time being precious no longer seems like something that you just say in passing when talking to friends. Your time really does become precious and your sense of purpose kicks into over drive. Breast cancer is affecting more young African American women each year and the ages continue to get younger and younger. But the diagnosis, the treatment, and the recovery do not have to be a grim experience.

    Yes, it’s extremely hard and will probably be the hardest thing you will ever have to go through in your life. Questions may arise such as: how did this happen to me? Why me? And what am I going to do now? I had all of these same questions after all, I was only 31 years old, African American, and in good health. These are all common concerns among women who have been diagnosed with this disease, but more important than the initial shock and the treatment and even surgery is the mental state of the woman after she learns that she has the disease. For every woman who has just learned that she has breast cancer and for every woman who knows another who has been diagnosed there are five rules that we must all follow in order to ensure that our lives and the lives of our loved ones will be fulfilled while we take this journey.

    (1) Focus on getting better. Spend very little time thinking about the disease itself, rather, spend time thinking about your life after you get better. I had a nurse to admit to me that people get sicker when they spend too much time in the hospital worrying about their illness.

    (2) Avoid morbid, pessimistic people. Even people that you love and who love you can become a drain on your spirit when they spend too much time treating you like your diagnosis is an automatic death sentence. Many people recover from cancer and go on to lead happy, healthy, and fulfilling lives.

    (3) Change your diet. Don’t accept any of the soda, sweets, and other junk foods offered to you at your cancer treatment center or anywhere else. A low/no dairy, low/no sugar, no alcohol, and junk free diet helps your body to fight against the tumor while you are going through conventional treatments. Drink plenty of water, eat extra servings of fresh vegetables, and add extra fiber to your diet to cleanse your body.

     
Coping with Breast Cancer
    (4) Keep doing what you. The initial diagnosis will be a serious blow and the chemotherapy treatments and surgery will knock you off your feet for a while, but keep your eyes on the prize. Staying focused on your family life (esp. your children) helps you to maintain a positive and healthy mental state. A positive and healthy mental state also helps your body to fight against the cancer and to recuperate from the toxicity of chemotherapy. The entire time that I have been going through treatments, I have been a single mother, a sociology student, a freelance writer and author, and a small business owner. I never missed a beat (except the days when I was ill from the chemo) because I chose to continue living and thriving.

    (5) Pray, meditate, chant, or whatever it is that you do. Your mind needs to be cleansed when going through a battle with breast cancer. Your spirit should always be nurtured so that you may receive divine guidance. Spend little time sobbing in prayer and more time focused on what you want your outcome to be. Love yourself, visualize your body healing, and trust that things will work out as they should.

    As a breast cancer patient and self proclaimed ‘survivor’ of the disease, I know all too well what a woman goes through after she gets that call from the doctor’s office. Some women choose to immediately join support groups and notify their family members. There are other women who decide that the best way to deal with the disease and the forthcoming recovery, is to cope in solitude and in silence. I was one of those women. As a breast cancer patient enduring the most toxic of chemotherapy treatments in conjunction with a few naturopathic treatments, I have learned that my immediate state of mind and well being contribute greatly to the way that my body has responded to the treatments and how well I am doing physically while on the road to recovery. Throughout this transition I came up with five ways to cope with the disease so that may have the best outcome while on the road to recovery.

    Zekita is freelance writer and the author of ‘YourStory Book One’. Her articles have been published by many national and international publications and she has been featured by ABC World News and the Roland S. Martin radio show. To learn more please visit http://www.zeniampublications.com.
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    The articles on this website are provided for information purposes only. BlackRefer.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content on this site or reliance by any person on the site's contents. Use at your own risk.

    No Implied Endorsement:
    BlackRefer.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. The views and opinions of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackRefer.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackRefer.com.





BLACK / AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN'S  HEALTH
   

  1. Alcohol and Drug Rehab for Women...
    Website provides information, resources and next-steps for women who are trying to recover from drug and alcohol addiction.

  2. A National African-American Breast Cancer Survivorship Organization...
    A National African-American Breast Cancer Survivorship Organization website.

  3. Black Womens Health ...
    Dedicated, health and wellness, African American woman.

  4. Black Women Mental-Health Needs Not Met...
    Sixty percent of African American women suffer depression, but few seek professional help because of the communal stigma and because there are few providers specializing in African American issues. Now, new mental health initiatives are reaching out.

  5. Booty Nomics...
    A fitness site for women to embrace their curves and not lose them, while obtaining optimum health benefits.

  6. California Black Women's Health Project...
    (CABWHP) focuses on empowering Black women to take personal responsibility for our own health and to advocate for changes in policies that adversely affect Black women's health status.

  7. Celebrating Life...
    African American women speak out about breast cancer.

  8. Divas For a Cure...
    Divas For A Cure Breast Cancer Fundraising Campaign.

  9. Drug Dangers ...
    Providing information on a range of medications and medical devices that have serious complications. Our organization aims to spread information on medications and devices that cause damage the general public and contact those who take interest.

  10. Fibroid Relief ...
    A women’s health organization that educates women about uterine fibroid treatment options. As you may know, black women are affected disproportionately by fibroids.

  11. Global Wellness Project ...
    We produce educational and engaging films, television programming, and new media designed to promote preventive healthcare and wellness in the minority community.

  12. Improving the African American Woman's Health and Wellness...
    Blackwomenshealth.com is a site dedicated to improving the African American Woman's physical mental, and spirtual health and wellness.

  13. Jeanne Elizabeth Blum...
    Author of "Woman Heal Thyself" A book based on ancient Chinese acupressure techniques. Also information for men with prostate cancer.

  14. JourneyForControl.com...
    What is type 2 diabetes? Find the answer and more at the Journey for Control Web site.

  15. MedlinePlus: African-American Health...
    African-American health information.

  16. MiracleCord Inc. ...
    MiracleCord leads the industry with the most advanced and comprehensive Cord blood banking services.

  17. Stress and Other Workplace Afflictions...
    Increase awareness that ALL people have the inherent right to be treated fairly, with dignity and respect in the workplace.

  18. The Healthy Diva ...
    A place where novices and seasoned individuals can find reliable information in how to implement green living, vegan or vegetarian habits in to their lives without complications.

  19. The Health Of Minority Women...
    The Health of Minority Women information.

  20. The Menopause and Black Cohosh Center...
    At the Menopause and Black Cohosh center, you can get up-to-date information on menopause and black cohosh, hormone replacement therapy and the latest menopause research.

  21. Viennas Herbal Compounds...
    Vienna's Herbal Compounds sinse 1991, Our mission is to provide all natural, superior quality health products for the mind and body, with love, from Harlem to you.

  22. WeSpeakLoudly...
    This site provide health, nutrition, wellness, and self-care resources especially for Black women.

  23. Yaz Lawsuits...
    The focus of DrugAlert is to keep consumers informed about their prescription drugs and the devastating side effects which may occur.














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